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How Long To Burn In Denon HD2000?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

On average, how long should you burn in the Denon HD2000? Also, what types of tracks should you use to burn them in?

post #2 of 21

just listen too music

post #3 of 21
I think I just played my iPod on shuffle (either that or metalica) for approx 72 hours at reasonably loud levels, It made a noticable difference to me.
Ps this is probably not the best way
post #4 of 21

If I get a new hp and it's way too bright or has muddy bass, then I'll usually burn it in for a few days and give it another listen. I think I remember putting my d2k on the cooker for about two days and that seemed to do the trick for them. 

 

I used a diversity of music at a slightly loud level.

 

gL!!

post #5 of 21
use pink noise. The denons take longer than most to settle in, over 200 hours. Refer to the d2000 thread
post #6 of 21

Burn them in while listening to music. Easy. 

post #7 of 21

200+ hrs, only after that bass will ease out and will be less boomy....I never let it on cooker...just put on and enjoy...you will observe some time bass is muddy...boomy....and after some time everything will settle down...also very good way to train your ears too... 

post #8 of 21

I would use a good pressure cooker. Also, the resulting boiled leather will resist sword blows much better.

Seriously though, just listen to them, and enjoy the placebo of hearing things as they 'burn in'

post #9 of 21
Thread Starter 

I keep wondering if it's just a placebo effect kind of concept with the "burning in" but I am going to make a playlist of various music in my collection (I am eclectic so there's a lot of different genre's) and play them on medium power while I'm sleep and see if I get different results tomorrow. I just received them today and they sound great. Clarity is awesome!

post #10 of 21

Use pink noise, not music.  It basically plays the entire frequency range equally at once, meaning the driver will get a better workout across the spectrum of sound it can deliver.  That's just IMO.

 

Burn-in on the Denons is 100% real.  I just finished burning in the pair I got recently and the difference was night and day, especially with the bass how it tightened up.  I listened to them new outta the box for 5-10 minutes for quick impressions then I put them on a repeating schedule of 1.5 hours pink noise/5 minutes rest for 211h 10m 36s (OCD much!? lol) total, keeping track on a timer app with my phone.  Anyone that thinks it's brain burn in is wrong, because I didn't listen to the headphones save for a song every 30-40 hours just to check the progress and see if it's changed much, while using other cans in the mean time, thus it's impossible that my brain burned into the sound signature to any significant degree.  I noticed definite and obvious (good) changes to the sound signature over the burn in period.  After 200 hours I can safely say that burn in on these cans is essential.


Edited by A Ham Sandwich - 6/28/12 at 3:21am
post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Ham Sandwich View Post

Use pink noise, not music.  It basically plays the entire frequency range equally at once, meaning the driver will get a better workout across the spectrum of sound it can deliver.  That's just IMO.

 

Burn-in on the Denons is 100% real.  I just finished burning in the pair I got recently and the difference was night and day, especially with the bass how it tightened up.  I listened to them new outta the box for 5-10 minutes for quick impressions then I put them on a repeating schedule of 1.5 hours noise/5 minutes rest for 211h 10m 36s (OCD much!? lol) total, keeping track on a timer app with my phone.  Anyone that thinks it's brain burn in is wrong, because I didn't listen to the headphones save for a song every 30-40 hours just to check the progress and see if it's changed much, while using other cans in the mean time, thus it's impossible that my brain burned into the sound signature.  I noticed definite and obvious (good) changes to the sound signature over the burn in period.  After 200 hours I can safely say that burn in on these cans is essential.

 

 

 

or your brain can say this definitely has to sound better now because i burned it in for 211h 10m 36s biggrin.gif

post #12 of 21

I would say, if you want to do it properly, buy 2 of the same can. Listen to them both briefly to check that they both sound the same.
Burn one in for a long period of time, leave the other.
Find a volunteer, blindfold them, and tell them they're about to listen to 2 different sets of cans, don't tell them they're the same model, or that one has been burnt in and the other hasn't, leave them totally in the dark, and ask their opinion on any difference in sound.
Repeat this test with 5000 or so volunteers, and see if people hear any burn in.
Also, Measure both sets of cans to see if there is measurable change to the FR and CSD waterfall plots of the cans, square waves etc. resistance etc. full set of data would be nice.

Do a decent investigation, and you can satisfy the logical cynic in me.
Don't just tell me how different it is. because logically, there should be little or no change, the only mechanical moving part in a dynamic driver, is the surround, which should have little effect on the sound.

post #13 of 21

"Brain burn in" is what the non-believers preach when they mean that your ears got used to the sound signature, while there were no actual changes to the sound.  You're talking about bias, which is different.  I was really curious to see if the 200+ hour claims in the Denon thread were real, hence the extremely limited listening before the burn-in process was done.  So, if anything, my mindset was to confirm or deny the 200+ hours that the D2000 thread recommends, not to see if it sounded better though I figured it probably would be different.

post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by PleasantNoise View Post

I would say, if you want to do it properly, buy 2 of the same can. Listen to them both briefly to check that they both sound the same.
Burn one in for a long period of time, leave the other.
Find a volunteer, blindfold them, and tell them they're about to listen to 2 different sets of cans, don't tell them they're the same model, or that one has been burnt in and the other hasn't, leave them totally in the dark, and ask their opinion on any difference in sound.
Repeat this test with 5000 or so volunteers, and see if people hear any burn in.
Also, Measure both sets of cans to see if there is measurable change to the FR and CSD waterfall plots of the cans, square waves etc. resistance etc. full set of data would be nice.

Do a decent investigation, and you can satisfy the logical cynic in me.
Don't just tell me how different it is. because logically, there should be little or no change, the only mechanical moving part in a dynamic driver, is the surround, which should have little effect on the sound.

 

 

 

those volunteers should be the people who claimed they can hear the difference of burn in, that will make it even more interesting

post #15 of 21

... and here we go down the rabbit hole!

 

[AKA, yet another thread arguing about burn-in, how unpredictable head-fi!]

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