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Something similar to Philip Glass's "Violin Concerto"?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

And although i very much appreciate anyone's help/recommendation, please dont just offer up any other minimalist piece, b/c Glass is a minimalist.

I find his Violin Concerto to be minimal, yes...but quite emotive, dynamic and containing dissonance (as opposed to consonance).

 

I have been searching for a specific style of classical music for years and although I have found some pieces that I love, I seem to run into the same issue over and over. That is, I find them to be too bombastic and/or too "happy" sounding and they dont seem to illicit any emotion from me (many also seem "old fashioned" to me). I am not looking for depressing music per se, but pieces that are a bit darker, emotive and that illicit a certain emotion. Its for this reason that I very much enjoy movie soundtracks, but I find the pieces to be frustratingly short.

 

What has fit the bill:

 

Bartok's Concerto For Orchestra (powerful!)

Arvo Part's 3rd Symphony

Gorecki's 3rd Symphony; 1st movement (not a big fan of choral)

Debussy-Clair de Lune

Barber-Adagio (this might be one of the most beautiful pieces of music I have ever heard)

Ennio Morricone (Yo-Yo Ma plays...amazing)

 

What hasnt "clicked"...yet:

 

Mahler-I have his 7th and 9th; not doing it for me...

Sibelius-I may have bought too much of his material at once (String Quartet, Violin Concerto, Symphony 6 and 7 are quite beautiful...)...dont know where to start otherwise

Barber-cant seem to find anything that sounds even remotely like "adagio" (I have his Concerto for Violin and Orchestra)

 

Fyi, I dont own anything by Stravinsky.

 

Thank you for reading!


Edited by kwitel - 6/25/12 at 8:19pm
post #2 of 19

If anyone finds something on the level of Adagio for Strings by Barber, I would be extremely interested as well.

I recently started exercising to Philip Glass, and like Ennio Morricone from "Once Upon a Time in the West," my favorite western movie.

post #3 of 19

I don't know how much you're familiar with the classical repertoire, but if you're looking for something dark and emotive, what first comes to mind for me is Tristan & Isold's Prelude by Wagner. I think I've yet to hear something that expresses the melancholia, passion and desire of the human soul more profoundly (the use of it in von Trier's Melancholia is brilliant for that matter).

 

Arvo Part has a lot of dark, yet uplifting music full of human emotions and divine longing. His Miserere is my favorite of his, using lots of dissonance but also some absolutely divine moments such as the ending. Try also De Profundis, Cantus in memoriam Benjamin Britten and Wallfahrtslied / Pilgrim's Song.

 

Richard Strauss' Four Last Songs are also some of the most powerful music I know of, as they were written right before his death and deal with death on a poetic level. The harmonies are absolutely gorgeous and the 3rd song is one of the wonders of this earth.

 


 

post #4 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OneiroiGuitar View Post

I don't know how much you're familiar with the classical repertoire, but if you're looking for something dark and emotive, what first comes to mind for me is Tristan & Isold's Prelude by Wagner. I think I've yet to hear something that expresses the melancholia, passion and desire of the human soul more profoundly (the use of it in von Trier's Melancholia is brilliant for that matter).

 

Arvo Part has a lot of dark, yet uplifting music full of human emotions and divine longing. His Miserere is my favorite of his, using lots of dissonance but also some absolutely divine moments such as the ending. Try also De Profundis, Cantus in memoriam Benjamin Britten and Wallfahrtslied / Pilgrim's Song.

 

Richard Strauss' Four Last Songs are also some of the most powerful music I know of, as they were written right before his death and deal with death on a poetic level. The harmonies are absolutely gorgeous and the 3rd song is one of the wonders of this earth.

 


 

 

That piece by Wagner sounds beautiful. Is it an opera?

Is the entire T&I in this same vain or is it just Prelude? (I am not a fan of opera and/or vocals)

 

What cd would you recommend I buy?

 

EDIT: a friend of mine has one complete song (Prelude and Liebestod) together in one track? 


Edited by kwitel - 6/26/12 at 9:39am
post #5 of 19
You might want to get a CD of Wagner preludes and overtures. There's lots of music there you'd probably like. I'd recommend the bargain priced collections by either Solti, Tennstedt or Karajan.
post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

You might want to get a CD of Wagner preludes and overtures. There's lots of music there you'd probably like. I'd recommend the bargain priced collections by either Solti, Tennstedt or Karajan.

 

Are these all purely instrumental?

Also, I searched and some are two cd sets, other 1.

Based on my tastes above, would i be more interested in the Overtures, Preludes or a mix like the Solti Collection you recommended? (there is one on Ebay for about 4$)


Edited by kwitel - 6/26/12 at 4:01pm
post #7 of 19

The overtures and preludes are orchestral... no voices. Preludes and Overtures are kind of the same thing. They're the introduction music before the opera starts that contain all the musical themes of the opera. Wagner's overtures are fantastic. The Solti is a good choice.

post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

The overtures and preludes are orchestral... no voices. Preludes and Overtures are kind of the same thing. They're the introduction music before the opera starts that contain all the musical themes of the opera. Wagner's overtures are fantastic. The Solti is a good choice.

 

Thank you for that explanation.

 

Why are some of the "Wagner Preludes and Overtures" 2 cds (15-16 pieces) while the Solti (for example) is 1 cd?

post #9 of 19
Quote:
Why are some of the "Wagner Preludes and Overtures" 2 cds (15-16 pieces) while the Solti (for example) is 1 cd?

 

 

Wagner made lots of operas. In fact, that's almost everything he ever composed, it was, according him, the ultimate artistic expression. Some collections thus contain more preludes and more operas than others.
 

Quote:

That piece by Wagner sounds beautiful. Is it an opera?

Is the entire T&I in this same vain or is it just Prelude? (I am not a fan of opera and/or vocals)

 

Yes, it's his most acknowledged masterpiece and it was totally revolutionary at the time (the first chords you hear in the Prelude were big advancements in term of dissonant harmony). I suggest watching the opera if you want to listen to it in its entirety. If not, it's like you're listening to a movie score without having seen the movie, plus you're not understanding a word of what the singers are saying. It's really a masterpiece and you'll find that all the small themes ("leitmotives" as we call them in Wagner's music) in the Prelude recur at different times in the story, each one symbolizing an idea, a feeling or a person.

post #10 of 19

two cds is better

post #11 of 19

I've only been actively listening to classical music for the last couple of years so my knowledge of different composers and compositions is still somewhat limited. Regardless, I've selected a couple of examples that came to mind. I'm not sure if they are what you are looking for, but I tried to avoid bombastic pieces and stick to music that can be considered modern. Arvo Pärt was already mentioned earlier so I'm not going to name any of his works, only say that I highly recommend his music.

 

I haven't heard more than a couple of John Adams' works so far, but I really like The Dharma at Big Sur. It might not be the kind of dark music you were asking for but I wouldn't categorize it has happy sounding either. The composition is in two parts and I've embedded YouTube videos for both below.

 

 

I'm also not that familiar with Einojuhani Rautavaara, but I would recommend giving both his violin concerto and eight symphony a try. They really require concentration and might not open the first time you hear them, so repeated listening is advised.

 

Lastly I'd like to mention Max Richter. I'm not sure if his music is considered to be classical music or not but I don't personally care about how the music is labeled. His music is... beautiful, simple but not necessarily minimal, and also sometimes melancholic. The Blue Notebooks is so far the only album I've heard from him but it's excellent. I've linked two songs from the album below.

 

post #12 of 19

You should listen to Missy Mazzoli's 5-piece act Victoire. I did a review of their album for my site (not trying to spam, but you can stream it below the review :)

 

The pieces are short, but I think you might enjoy the modern sound. Quite dark and quite engaging. My favorite was "A Song for Arthur Russel."

 

The album overall is minimal, engaging, and dark.

 

http://sonicescapes.com/?portfolio=victoire-cathedral-city

post #13 of 19

Wow, TJ Elite, I really love that John Adams piece. I find his minimalist style to be more interesting compared to the previous minimalists, which were very important in terms of influence and musical perspectives, but most of their works get kind of boring for me after more than 20 minutes. Adams combines the minimalist technique with other forms and a very broad palette of harmonies and musical influences. Harmonium remains his greatest work IMO. I dare you not to be moved by this excerpt of the 3rd movement wink.gif:

 


 

post #14 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OneiroiGuitar View Post

I don't know how much you're familiar with the classical repertoire, but if you're looking for something dark and emotive, what first comes to mind for me is Tristan & Isold's Prelude by Wagner. I think I've yet to hear something that expresses the melancholia, passion and desire of the human soul more profoundly (the use of it in von Trier's Melancholia is brilliant for that matter).

 

Arvo Part has a lot of dark, yet uplifting music full of human emotions and divine longing. His Miserere is my favorite of his, using lots of dissonance but also some absolutely divine moments such as the ending. Try also De Profundis, Cantus in memoriam Benjamin Britten and Wallfahrtslied / Pilgrim's Song.

 

Richard Strauss' Four Last Songs are also some of the most powerful music I know of, as they were written right before his death and deal with death on a poetic level. The harmonies are absolutely gorgeous and the 3rd song is one of the wonders of this earth.

 


 

 

I am LOVING (in particular) the Tristan and Isolde preludes. Stunning! Thank you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ Elite View Post

I've only been actively listening to classical music for the last couple of years so my knowledge of different composers and compositions is still somewhat limited. Regardless, I've selected a couple of examples that came to mind. I'm not sure if they are what you are looking for, but I tried to avoid bombastic pieces and stick to music that can be considered modern. Arvo Pärt was already mentioned earlier so I'm not going to name any of his works, only say that I highly recommend his music.

 

I haven't heard more than a couple of John Adams' works so far, but I really like The Dharma at Big Sur. It might not be the kind of dark music you were asking for but I wouldn't categorize it has happy sounding either. The composition is in two parts and I've embedded YouTube videos for both below.

 

 

I'm also not that familiar with Einojuhani Rautavaara, but I would recommend giving both his violin concerto and eight symphony a try. They really require concentration and might not open the first time you hear them, so repeated listening is advised.

 

Lastly I'd like to mention Max Richter. I'm not sure if his music is considered to be classical music or not but I don't personally care about how the music is labeled. His music is... beautiful, simple but not necessarily minimal, and also sometimes melancholic. The Blue Notebooks is so far the only album I've heard from him but it's excellent. I've linked two songs from the album below.

 

TJ-already a big fan of both Adams and Richter (although the former can get too minimal/repetetive for me at times. Am enjoying the above though-thanks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by OneiroiGuitar View Post

Wow, TJ Elite, I really love that John Adams piece. I find his minimalist style to be more interesting compared to the previous minimalists, which were very important in terms of influence and musical perspectives, but most of their works get kind of boring for me after more than 20 minutes. Adams combines the minimalist technique with other forms and a very broad palette of harmonies and musical influences. Harmonium remains his greatest work IMO. I dare you not to be moved by this excerpt of the 3rd movement wink.gif:

 


 

 

Agreed.

post #15 of 19

Lento by Howard Skempton.  A piece for orchestra written as a companion piece to Wagner's Prelude from Parsifal.

 

 

The Protecting Veil, for Cello and Orchestra, by John Tavener.

 

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