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**Shure SE425 Review** - Page 2

post #16 of 55

I find setting the EQ setting to Treble Boost really augments the sound produced from the SE425 and is the perfect solution to the treble roll-off. It was a bit lacking prior to this setting, but now I am very content with the sound and more.

post #17 of 55
Thread Starter 

You can also try a 6N SPC upgrade cable, i got one for my SE535, it really helped control the bass and bring out the highs and a bit more detail

post #18 of 55

Comparing SE425 to SE215, what is the different in term of sound stage & instruments/vocal separation?

post #19 of 55

I recieved the SE425 today I feel they are better than the E4c the last Shures I tried in 2008, but still lack that attention to clarity that I'm looking for.

The sound stage is pretty narrow also....while sampling Revel's Bolero on RCA Living Stereo, and Milt Jackson's Goodbye on CTI the instruments sound like they were performed straight into my ears without much field of depth or three dimentional placing. And with the lack of high frequencies the sound is vieled, not as muddy the E4 though.

This was done on an iPod Touch and Samsung P3 with 320 kbps encodings.

The bass is fine, people make the bass sound weak but its not, if theres boom in the recording then theres boom in the SE425. It just doesnt take much liberties with it.

I understand that the SE535 improve on some of these issues but I know that they are subtle and don't justify the addition $150.

I will keep experimenting with higher end scources and different ear tips but these might wind up in the For Sale/Trade forums soon.

post #20 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ Max View Post

I recieved the SE425 today I feel they are better than the E4c the last Shures I tried in 2008, but still lack that attention to clarity that I'm looking for.

The sound stage is pretty narrow also....while sampling Revel's Bolero on RCA Living Stereo, and Milt Jackson's Goodbye on CTI the instruments sound like they were performed straight into my ears without much field of depth or three dimentional placing. And with the lack of high frequencies the sound is vieled, not as muddy the E4 though.

This was done on an iPod Touch and Samsung P3 with 320 kbps encodings.

The bass is fine, people make the bass sound weak but its not, if theres boom in the recording then theres boom in the SE425. It just doesnt take much liberties with it.

I understand that the SE535 improve on some of these issues but I know that they are subtle and don't justify the addition $150.

I will keep experimenting with higher end scources and different ear tips but these might wind up in the For Sale/Trade forums soon.

 

I'm not sure how you ended up getting those, the SE425s are designed to have a high frequency roll off, hence the 'veil'.

That said, as a SE425 user, I can say that they're not for everyone, it depends a lot on the music you listen to, and I like them for their mid-centric sound, very smooth on the vocals and other instruments, and sometimes it can bring out certain elements you won't get to hear otherwise. Also, they're less fatiguing, and you can use them for extended periods of time.


Edited by proton007 - 11/26/12 at 10:02pm
post #21 of 55

I understand the nature of these earphone. I've read a number of positive review that convenced me to at least try them. I love the fact that they are primarily neutral, and have a detachable cable. They feel very comfortable in the ears too. But they may not be for recordings of Classical and Jazz. But better for professional monitoring and live stage usage for a perfomer and not an audience which Shure already does hints at.

post #22 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ Max View Post
But they may not be for recordings of Classical and Jazz. But better for professional monitoring and live stage usage for a perfomer and not an audience which Shure already does hints at.


Thats a bit of a generalization, don't you think? 

post #23 of 55

The first part yes it is, the second part not so much if you read Shures ads.

post #24 of 55
Thread Starter 
Never heard the SE215 but the 425 is fairly neutral, the 215 is bassy.

I found the 425 to have a pretty good soundstage, and jazz to me sounded great, lacked a bit of sparkle up top, but the great thing about the Shure's is the natural presentation, and those oh so smooth mids. The Shure sound is not for everyone.
post #25 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ Max View Post

The first part yes it is, the second part not so much if you read Shures ads.


TBH, thats how most IEM companies sell their stuff, hence the name In Ear Monitor. 

Look at UE, Westone and Shure as well...they target both audiophiles and stage performers alike.

 

As far as I can see, the Shure IEMs page reads "Monitoring and Personal Listening".

post #26 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by randomkid View Post

I found the 425 to have a pretty good soundstage, and jazz to me sounded great, lacked a bit of sparkle up top, but the great thing about the Shure's is the natural presentation, and those oh so smooth mids. The Shure sound is not for everyone.


In my experience, songs that rely on the higher frequencies are a bit less sparkly as you say. I wouldn't recommend these for rock/metal/electronic.

 

I believe its got to do with 'masking effect'. A higher frequency sound will 'mask' or cover a lower frequency sound. Treble tends to mask the mids, and you may miss the subtlety of the vocals and instruments. So the treble roll off lets the mids through nicely.


Edited by proton007 - 11/26/12 at 10:58pm
post #27 of 55

One of the good things about a seeminly flat neutral earphones is that they are a lot easier to customize with equing and processing than earphones stuck in a pre determined state don't you think?

 

Having said that, these sound a lot better on my Samsung Galaxy S II. 

Lowering the 250hz and raising 4-8khz in the EQ with the Clarity setting turned on helps a lot.


Edited by TJ Max - 11/26/12 at 11:14pm
post #28 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ Max View Post

One of the good things about a seeminly flat neutral earphones is that they are a lot easier to customize with equing and processing than earphones stuck in a pre determined state don't you think?

 

 

Thats true, but in my experience, getting a headphone to enhance certain characteristics is more troublesome than tuning things down. It can change things slightly, but its hard to change the sound character.

post #29 of 55
Thread Starter 
I'm not a fan of EQ personally.

Give the 425 some time, you may come to enjoy them, if not you can sell them.

Rock didn't sound too bad on them, metal wasn't that good. One band I really enjoyed with them was mumford and suns
post #30 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by randomkid View Post

I'm not a fan of EQ personally.
Give the 425 some time, you may come to enjoy them, if not you can sell them.
Rock didn't sound too bad on them, metal wasn't that good. One band I really enjoyed with them was mumford and suns


I'm not sure if the post was meant for me...I'm a happy SE425 user!

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