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Grado PS1000, very mixed and not review like impressions. - Page 10

post #136 of 193

I just purchased the PS1000 and I can tell you that the one that I purchased sounds different than the one I auditioned. The one I auditioned had an annoying peak and brightness that was driving me nuts. The one I purchased does not have that at all and sounded better out of the box. 

 

The only factors could be (1) break-in vs. new phone, (2) I didn't have the extension cord when I auditioned, or (3) inconsistency from phone to phone. In any event, these are terrific headphones and I just can't tear myself away from them.

 

I am also breaking in a new amp but it was like I returned the demos to the store, came home with the new ones and had phones that were without question less bright.

 

Are these going to get brighter as they break in? 


Edited by BlackstoneJD - 8/19/12 at 7:54pm
post #137 of 193

They won't sound their best until you show us pics :)  

post #138 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by priest View Post

 

Strange, my PS1000 wipes the floor with the RS1i in depth. We must have very different ears, or very different production units.

 

I agree,altough i've never owned the RS1i,my dealer lend me a pair to try for a few days,and i came to the same conclusion,the PS1000 have a bigger soundstage,that's not surprising,the RS1i have never been known for having a big soundstage.

 

I also compared my first gen GS1000 to my PS1000 and the GS,have an even bigger soundstage,in fact i believe that they probably have the biggest soundstage of any Grados,but they probably also have the most ressesed midrange of any Grados. 

post #139 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackstoneJD View Post

 

Are these going to get brighter as they break in? 

 

I would not expect that at all.

 

Congratulations on your new gear!

post #140 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by stacker45 View Post

 

I agree,altough i've never owned the RS1i,my dealer lend me a pair to try for a few days,and i came to the same conclusion,the PS1000 have a bigger soundstage,that's not surprising,the RS1i have never been known for having a big soundstage.

 

I also compared my first gen GS1000 to my PS1000 and the GS,have an even bigger soundstage,in fact i believe that they probably have the biggest soundstage of any Grados,but they probably also have the most ressesed midrange of any Grados. 

 

the same goes for the gs1000i compared to the ps1000 when i auditioned them. the gs1000i sounds crispier too. wink.gif

post #141 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by stacker45 View Post

 

I agree,altough i've never owned the RS1i,my dealer lend me a pair to try for a few days,and i came to the same conclusion,the PS1000 have a bigger soundstage,that's not surprising,the RS1i have never been known for having a big soundstage.

 

I also compared my first gen GS1000 to my PS1000 and the GS,have an even bigger soundstage,in fact i believe that they probably have the biggest soundstage of any Grados,but they probably also have the most ressesed midrange of any Grados. 

John Grado believes that you can't have forward midrange (RS1 style) and big soundstage at the same time. He went too far the other way on GS1000 in my opinion.

post #142 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackmore View Post

Well, I was more or less talking about numbers:

 

Input impedance:

Frequency response:

Signal to noise ratio:

THD:

Channel separation:

Output power:

Input impedance:

Output impedance:

Power dissipation:

 

 

I just copied this from online, not that I really have full idea about it, but, for me, it is interesting, cos when I found out the same numbers of my Cary, I can get the idea, I guess...

 

THX

 

 Had the golden opportunity the other day to audition the K1000 'Bass Heavy' version off a proper rig -

 the DIY amp in question had at least 10 Watts in reserve so I assume they were properly powered :-)

 

 Bottom end aside, these are still very much a reference headphone, I found them to be quite charming with

 their quick pace and refined high end control. I'd call them complimentary to something like the GS1000i / PS1000i.

 Bass was a little one dimensional but everything else (at the time of audition) was difficult to fault.

 

 

post #143 of 193
Thread Starter 

Yes, agree, but just a little expensive to have two differ systems next to each other, at least for me.

 

 

THX

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gwarmi View Post

 

 Had the golden opportunity the other day to audition the K1000 'Bass Heavy' version off a proper rig -

 the DIY amp in question had at least 10 Watts in reserve so I assume they were properly powered :-)

 

 Bottom end aside, these are still very much a reference headphone, I found them to be quite charming with

 their quick pace and refined high end control. I'd call them complimentary to something like the GS1000i / PS1000i.

 Bass was a little one dimensional but everything else (at the time of audition) was difficult to fault.

 

 

post #144 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackmore View Post

Yes, agree, but just a little expensive to have two differ systems next to each other, at least for me.

 

 

THX

 

 

 

 That is a conumdrum that I've been contemplating of late - two systems and their associated expenses.

 

 One thing to think about though not just through your own personal experiences - I know so many Head-Fi folks who

 incessantly buy, sell, trade, exchange - all in the name of finding that one holy grail rig.

 

 Rarely do they take a step back to think about all the lost $cash$ during these transitions. A quick stock take

 could show that over the years, this procession they may very well reveal that they had the funds all along

 to own two different rigs in the first place.

 

 Precisely why in my case - I'm pretty happy with my digital setup - I don't see myself spending a fortune

 going forward in that direction - if anything vinyl has reminded me that it could be the better option as

 a complimentary setup. I don't see too many personal regrets with vinyl, you don't have to get carried

 away either - bit over a grand and that takes care of the table, cartridge and phono stage.

post #145 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gwarmi View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackmore View Post

Yes, agree, but just a little expensive to have two differ systems next to each other, at least for me.

 

 

THX

 

 

 

 That is a conumdrum that I've been contemplating of late - two systems and their associated expenses.

 

 One thing to think about though not just through your own personal experiences - I know so many Head-Fi folks who

 incessantly buy, sell, trade, exchange - all in the name of finding that one holy grail rig.

 

 Rarely do they take a step back to think about all the lost $cash$ during these transitions. A quick stock take

 could show that over the years, this procession they may very well reveal that they had the funds all along

 to own two different rigs in the first place.

 

 Precisely why in my case - I'm pretty happy with my digital setup - I don't see myself spending a fortune

 going forward in that direction - if anything vinyl has reminded me that it could be the better option as

 a complimentary setup. I don't see too many personal regrets with vinyl, you don't have to get carried

 away either - bit over a grand and that takes care of the table, cartridge and phono stage.

I like this advice.

post #146 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gwarmi View Post

 

 That is a conumdrum that I've been contemplating of late - two systems and their associated expenses.

 

 One thing to think about though not just through your own personal experiences - I know so many Head-Fi folks who

 incessantly buy, sell, trade, exchange - all in the name of finding that one holy grail rig.

 

 Rarely do they take a step back to think about all the lost $cash$ during these transitions. A quick stock take

 could show that over the years, this procession they may very well reveal that they had the funds all along

 to own two different rigs in the first place.

 

 Precisely why in my case - I'm pretty happy with my digital setup - I don't see myself spending a fortune

 going forward in that direction - if anything vinyl has reminded me that it could be the better option as

 a complimentary setup. I don't see too many personal regrets with vinyl, you don't have to get carried

 away either - bit over a grand and that takes care of the table, cartridge and phono stage.

 

On a more or less related topic,i love vinyl and vintage gear,i have three modest sound systems,two of these consist of vintage 70's electronics,i have 4 turntables,three of wich are vintage,i paid $700 for all three,and they're all in mint condition,also,two of them were delivered to my house by their sellers.When i think that you can't even get one decent new turntable for less than $1000,it makes me feel  very good,i even have an old Pioneer RT1020L reel to reel tape recorder that sounds absolutely awesome.

 

One major advantage when you buy vintage gear is,not only can you often resell it for the same price you've paid,but if you got a good deal to begin with,you can even make a profit.Also,i believe that the old stuff looks much better that the new one.In my opinion,my 1975 Marantz 2220B looks much nicer than those ''black boxes'' on the market today. 

 

This can be a very expensive hobby,but it doesn't have to be,the only thing i tend to buy new are speakers or headphones,i find that they don't age as well as electronics,and i also think that,(feel free to disagree),they're the ones that have the most impact on sound quality.

 

Sorry for rambling on like that,i guess it's something i have to work on.

post #147 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by pcf View Post

John Grado believes that you can't have forward midrange (RS1 style) and big soundstage at the same time. He went too far the other way on GS1000 in my opinion.


i compared the gs1000i and ps1000 just the other day. the gs1000i had crisper highs and the bass seemed more controlled. i'd describe it as having a v shaped sound signature with its recessed mids creating the illusion of greater clarity and an even larger soundstage than the ps1000. however, the ps1000 has more mid-range presence making it the more complete headphone. the gs1000i's feather-light weight was welcome after wearing the unwieldy ps1000. the gs1000i is possibly the most comfortable headphone i've tried. i liked it. smile.gif


Edited by shimmer n roar - 8/22/12 at 6:18am
post #148 of 193

I might be on the outs in this thread as someone who doesn't perceive the GS1000i as having a larger soundstage than the PS1000, but I didn't spend a ton of time comparing them closely on that aspect, so maybe that's why. I see them both as having exceptionally large soundstages anyway, so in some sense this might be splitting hairs (if everything we say on this forum is not splitting hairs).

 

I did spend alot of time comparing them in general though, and really like them both. The GS1000i I would agree as having a more "crispy" or "airy" presentation. The aural images on the PS1000 appear more weighty or substantial to me, and so I found it a more engaging, passionate, and satisfying listen. However, the GS1000i is a great headphone, and a bargain in price compared to the flagship. There were many times during the course of my two-week comparison that I was either unsure which one I should sell, or was leaning towards keeping the GS1000i. Comfort was definitely a factor, but not the major one for me. The GS1000i put me in mind of my Stax rig ultimately, for the finesse and clarity of its presentation. I found that it occasionally sounded a little too bright for my tastes though with some recordings at higher volumes. This is something that never happens to me on my PS1000. On the other hand, the bass on the PS1000 is sometimes very slightly in my opinion over-stated, and it can get in the way of the mids. All headphones being flawed in some way, this is something I can live with. I intend to put my GS1000i up for sale, but will be sorry to see it go.

post #149 of 193

I don't feel the GS1000 have the bigger soundstage either. Is that really the general consensus?

post #150 of 193

I believe that the first generation GS1000 have a bigger soundstage than the PS1000.

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