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US trip

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I'll be going to the US this summer and I'm interested in visiting some audiophile stores. I assume there are some in the big cities :)

Also, if you have anything else you can recommend (not audio related) please do so.

 

I'll be flying to NYC, then flying to SF and driving from this point on to LA, Vegas, Grand Canyon Village, and San Diego.

Anything worth visiting in any of these places or along the way?

 

Thanks :)

post #2 of 14
That's a pretty large portion of the southwest, and there's quite a lot to do. Depends on what you like.
post #3 of 14

In-N-Out Burger is worth visiting.

post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by obobskivich View Post

That's a pretty large portion of the southwest, and there's quite a lot to do. Depends on what you like.


Well I'm open to any suggestions. I'm already planning on visiting Rockefeller, Broadway, Alcatraz, Hearst Castle, Universal Studios, Hoover Dam, Sea World, San Diego Zoo, and possibly some indoor shooting range in Las Vegas.

But I'll mainly be there to experience new things. Things which are not available in Europe.

post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by JesperZ View Post


Well I'm open to any suggestions. I'm already planning on visiting Rockefeller, Broadway, Alcatraz, Hearst Castle, Universal Studios, Hoover Dam, Sea World, San Diego Zoo, and possibly some indoor shooting range in Las Vegas.
But I'll mainly be there to experience new things. Things which are not available in Europe.

Those are all good; and that's a fairly large number of things you're out to see. I'd also suggest doing something outdoors while you're in Nevada/Arizona - there's lots of native ruins and generally beautiful terrain contained both on reservations (some of which you probably *can't* access) and in national parks (which you probably *can* access) that you could observe/visit, as well as the Grand Canyon in general. Some of the most epic ones will probably require an additional amount of driving into the four corners region (that's another day or two). If you go ahead with any of these activities, hydrate appropriately (and remember you're also going to be talking about a substantial altitude gain over Denmark in the southwest US).

In addition to Hearst Castle, you might also like the Winchester Mansion in San Jose.

As far as theme/adventure parks go - Universal Studios is neat, Sea World is neat, you might as well pony up and see Disneyland as well though. redface.gif

I'm not really familiar with Vegas proper - I know there's *lots* of entertainment venues in the major casinos, but I have no idea what's good and what's not good, which casino/hotels are ideal for staying in (I'm not implying any are bad, I'm sure there's a "ranking" though), and so on. Hopefully someone else chimes in there.

Oh, and the point about In-N-Out is both good by itself, and gets at a broader point: the food. Try it. I don't know if TexMex/Mexican food is very common in Europe, but some of the best restaurants around (outside of Mexico/Central America proper - which is a whole 'nother adventure) are located in the part of the world you're going to visit.

Within NYC itself - I have no clue really. Never been myself. redface.gif

I know there's a lot of tourist traps attractions like the Statue of Liberty/Ellis Island, various sporting venues, and so on. As far as electronics shops, since you mentioned them, J&R is supposed to be a sight to behold in NYC. In California, there's WeirdStuff and HSC (Sunnyvale and Rohnert Park (N of SF)) which have both been featured in various publications (one of them was featured in the NY Times, I forget which) and on Mythbusters. There's also Fry's Electronics which is a regional chain throughout California/Nevada/Arizona/Texas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fry's_Electronics#Store_themes).

Depending on how much additional driving you want to get into (I may be wrong, but your California/Arizona/Nevada trip probably will cover more land than the entire nation of Denmark), you could go up into Utah and see the various religious (LDS) monuments there, as well as Moab (outdoors, 4x4 stuff, camping). That's another 6-8 hours beyond Vegas though.
Edited by obobskivich - 6/17/12 at 1:59pm
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by obobskivich View Post


Those are all good; and that's a fairly large number of things you're out to see. I'd also suggest doing something outdoors while you're in Nevada/Arizona - there's lots of native ruins and generally beautiful terrain contained both on reservations (some of which you probably *can't* access) and in national parks (which you probably *can* access) that you could observe/visit, as well as the Grand Canyon in general. Some of the most epic ones will probably require an additional amount of driving into the four corners region (that's another day or two). If you go ahead with any of these activities, hydrate appropriately (and remember you're also going to be talking about a substantial altitude gain over Denmark in the southwest US).
In addition to Hearst Castle, you might also like the Winchester Mansion in San Jose.
As far as theme/adventure parks go - Universal Studios is neat, Sea World is neat, you might as well pony up and see Disneyland as well though. redface.gif
I'm not really familiar with Vegas proper - I know there's *lots* of entertainment venues in the major casinos, but I have no idea what's good and what's not good, which casino/hotels are ideal for staying in (I'm not implying any are bad, I'm sure there's a "ranking" though), and so on. Hopefully someone else chimes in there.
Oh, and the point about In-N-Out is both good by itself, and gets at a broader point: the food. Try it. I don't know if TexMex/Mexican food is very common in Europe, but some of the best restaurants around (outside of Mexico/Central America proper - which is a whole 'nother adventure) are located in the part of the world you're going to visit.
Within NYC itself - I have no clue really. Never been myself. redface.gif
I know there's a lot of tourist traps attractions like the Statue of Liberty/Ellis Island, various sporting venues, and so on. As far as electronics shops, since you mentioned them, J&R is supposed to be a sight to behold in NYC. In California, there's WeirdStuff and HSC (Sunnyvale and Rohnert Park (N of SF)) which have both been featured in various publications (one of them was featured in the NY Times, I forget which) and on Mythbusters. There's also Fry's Electronics which is a regional chain throughout California/Nevada/Arizona/Texas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fry's_Electronics#Store_themes).
Depending on how much additional driving you want to get into (I may be wrong, but your California/Arizona/Nevada trip probably will cover more land than the entire nation of Denmark), you could go up into Utah and see the various religious (LDS) monuments there, as well as Moab (outdoors, 4x4 stuff, camping). That's another 6-8 hours beyond Vegas though.

 

That's a whole lot of suggestions! Thanks, they are all very appreciated. I have already booked all the hotel rooms so I can't go off course if it means I have to stay overnight somewhere else than planned.

And yeah, I heard about old ruins in Arizona, but they were far to the east of Grand Canyon Village and I don't have the time to go there. But I'll look into what's somewhere along route 66 when I drive back from the canyon to San Diego.

 

There is a replica of the Disneyland in California in Paris, France. Although I've never been there I don't feel the urge to visit it, especially not in the US when I can just do it some other time when I happen to be in France. Besides I heard rumors that you spend more time waiting in line than actually trying stuff.

 

Regarding food, I actually don't eat junk food at all so I don't think that is something I'll check out. Mexican food is very common here too, but I plan on visiting Tijuana one afternoon when I'm in San Diego so I'll get to try real Mexican food.

Also, I will for sure do some research on the stores you mentioned.

 

And yeah, during this trip I will cover a lot of land. It's like driving through Denmark 20 times from one end to the other I think :D - but then again Denmark is quite small.

I actually have no idea how it is to be at a high altitude. Everywhere in Denmark it's less than 100 meters high, and the only high altitude I've been exposed to was while skiing in Austria and Norway when I was a kid. I can't remember how that was though.

post #7 of 14
I understand the travel changes - and I get that some of the suggestions are adding incredible amounts of time onto the journey. Just figured I'd throw it all out, and whatever sticks, sticks. smily_headphones1.gif

I'd have to agree with the standing in line bit, but that's any major theme park. You spend *lots* of time in lines. Interesting note on Mexican food in Europe; I didn't expect that. redface.gif Anyways, I'd certainly suggest it. And In-N-Out (it's just a Californian institution).

On the altitude thing (and I'm not a doctor and I'm also not in low altitude very often), what I recollect as "proper advice" for you is to ensure that you stay hydrated, and that you shouldn't be surprised if you end up drinking substantially more water to feel normal. Also don't try and do any insane physical activity while you're adjusting (e.g. don't go for a 3 mile run) - the air is thinner. I can't honestly remember the last time I was below 5000 ft though, and to me it's just "normal" - I've seen and heard about plenty of tourists who have to be taken down off the mountains in helicopters due to altitude sickness though (but that's usually people who are going up over 10,000 ft). California is going to be more like Denmark though (at least in the Bay area) - it's all at or around sea level. So I wouldn't expect any troubles there. Just be cognizant of the desert climate and altitude while you're in Arizona/Nevada/Utah/New Mexico - it's very easy to get dehydrated even if you aren't hiking.
post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by obobskivich View Post

I understand the travel changes - and I get that some of the suggestions are adding incredible amounts of time onto the journey. Just figured I'd throw it all out, and whatever sticks, sticks. smily_headphones1.gif
I'd have to agree with the standing in line bit, but that's any major theme park. You spend *lots* of time in lines. Interesting note on Mexican food in Europe; I didn't expect that. redface.gif Anyways, I'd certainly suggest it. And In-N-Out (it's just a Californian institution).
On the altitude thing (and I'm not a doctor and I'm also not in low altitude very often), what I recollect as "proper advice" for you is to ensure that you stay hydrated, and that you shouldn't be surprised if you end up drinking substantially more water to feel normal. Also don't try and do any insane physical activity while you're adjusting (e.g. don't go for a 3 mile run) - the air is thinner. I can't honestly remember the last time I was below 5000 ft though, and to me it's just "normal" - I've seen and heard about plenty of tourists who have to be taken down off the mountains in helicopters due to altitude sickness though (but that's usually people who are going up over 10,000 ft). California is going to be more like Denmark though (at least in the Bay area) - it's all at or around sea level. So I wouldn't expect any troubles there. Just be cognizant of the desert climate and altitude while you're in Arizona/Nevada/Utah/New Mexico - it's very easy to get dehydrated even if you aren't hiking.


Yeah that's alright. It's better that I've been presented to all the options than missing something that could be fun :)

Regarding Mexican food in Europe, it's not like we have restaurant chains like you do in the US, but I think most Europeans eat Mexican food monthly or weekly. At least, I make tortillas quite often myself :P

post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by JesperZ View Post


Yeah that's alright. It's better that I've been presented to all the options than missing something that could be fun smily_headphones1.gif
Regarding Mexican food in Europe, it's not like we have restaurant chains like you do in the US, but I think most Europeans eat Mexican food monthly or weekly. At least, I make tortillas quite often myself :P

You realize that y'all eat Mexican food more often than most Americans I know, right? Jus sayin.
post #10 of 14

I haven't read any posts in this thread, but you should visit the Yosemite National Park:

 

640px-1_yosemite_valley_tunnel_view_2010.JPG

post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by obobskivich View Post


You realize that y'all eat Mexican food more often than most Americans I know, right? Jus sayin.

 

Nah, really? What about Taco Bell and such chains, we don't have that here. Or at least not in Denmark.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeJack_2008 View Post

I haven't read any posts in this thread, but you should visit the Yosemite National Park:

 

640px-1_yosemite_valley_tunnel_view_2010.JPG

 

I would very much like to but I don't have much time in San Francisco so there's simply not time for such a long drive away from the route, unfortunately :(

post #12 of 14

Get yourself some damned good Chinese food in SF.  R&G Lounge seafood restaurant, get the crab!  Have some Dim Sum and tea for lunch.  Have some Korean BBQ, Kalbe, Bibimbap.  There's also the Stinking Rose in the bay area, it's a garlic centric restaurant.

 

Try to get to Peter Luger's steakhouse in NYC.  Largely recognized as the best steakhouse in America, no kidding.  Le Bernardin, Eric Ripert is the best seafood chef in America and one of the best in the world. 

 

In Vegas eat at L'Atelier (must have the quail & Robuchon potatoes) and/or Bartolotta's (squid ink risotto and lasagnette are must haves).  For American, try Rosemary's off the strip.

 

In TJ, have the street tacos from the stands.  Be careful, Mexico is more dangerous than Afghanistan so just be aware.

 

Too bad you aren't getting to Memphis and New Orleans...frown.gif  You could try some ribs at the Memphis BBQ joint in Vegas part of Mike Mills string of BBQ joints.

 

In n Out is nice but you need to know the hidden menu which requires some google digging.  Wendy's has gotten pretty darned good for a fast food joint tbh but if you want an American Burger, find a Fuddruckers.

 

American experiences.....

 

IMAX megaplexes, Walmart, check out an Albertson's then go to Whole Foods, drive on the freeways in So Cal and not like a bitch, take the BART, take the NY subway, go to a baseball game for an afternoon, see a show in Vegas, check out UC Berkeley and or Columbia U (NY subway drops you off right in harlem where Columbia is, kind of a neat contrast) and find some interesting classes to sit in on.  New world trade center in NYC, Empire State, hit the beach in San Diego, if you time it right around Coronado you might have some Navy SEALs pass by.  You could maybe find some pro drag racing if you are into that.   

post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anaxilus View Post

Get yourself some damned good Chinese food in SF.  R&G Lounge seafood restaurant, get the crab!  Have some Dim Sum and tea for lunch.  Have some Korean BBQ, Kalbe, Bibimbap.  There's also the Stinking Rose in the bay area, it's a garlic centric restaurant.

 

Try to get to Peter Luger's steakhouse in NYC.  Largely recognized as the best steakhouse in America, no kidding.  Le Bernardin, Eric Ripert is the best seafood chef in America and one of the best in the world. 

 

In Vegas eat at L'Atelier (must have the quail & Robuchon potatoes) and/or Bartolotta's (squid ink risotto and lasagnette are must haves).  For American, try Rosemary's off the strip.

 

In TJ, have the street tacos from the stands.  Be careful, Mexico is more dangerous than Afghanistan so just be aware.

 

Too bad you aren't getting to Memphis and New Orleans...frown.gif  You could try some ribs at the Memphis BBQ joint in Vegas part of Mike Mills string of BBQ joints.

 

In n Out is nice but you need to know the hidden menu which requires some google digging.  Wendy's has gotten pretty darned good for a fast food joint tbh but if you want an American Burger, find a Fuddruckers.

 

American experiences.....

 

IMAX megaplexes, Walmart, check out an Albertson's then go to Whole Foods, drive on the freeways in So Cal and not like a bitch, take the BART, take the NY subway, go to a baseball game for an afternoon, see a show in Vegas, check out UC Berkeley and or Columbia U (NY subway drops you off right in harlem where Columbia is, kind of a neat contrast) and find some interesting classes to sit in on.  New world trade center in NYC, Empire State, hit the beach in San Diego, if you time it right around Coronado you might have some Navy SEALs pass by.  You could maybe find some pro drag racing if you are into that.   


There are certainly a lot of food suggestions there. I'm gonna google each one of them, thanks :D

And the American experiences, that's exactly what I'm talking about. These suggestions are very helpful, thanks!

post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by JesperZ View Post


There are certainly a lot of food suggestions there. I'm gonna google each one of them, thanks biggrin.gif
And the American experiences, that's exactly what I'm talking about. These suggestions are very helpful, thanks!

Didn't even think about things like Wal-mart; that's so taken for granted.

On the Mexican food discussion, and I am not trying to speak for the whole of American: Taco Bell is kind of looked down on as "cheapest possible option" when it comes to food. It's something you can buy when you're on the road or otherwise don't have a lot of time/scratch. Actual Mexican restaurants aren't uncommon, but it's not something most people are hitting up every night. Statistically, Salsa is supposed to be the most popular condiment; but I'll tell you that I've never been in another person's house and been served Salsa (and I've been in a lot of houses).

Some other stuff you could take in, if you want to see American excess/daily-life: huge shopping centers (strip malls, shopping malls, etc), old-style diners (you'll find them on 66 easily - I make no guarantees that you won't regret it later), you could also (if you've got the right personality) set up a home showing with an unoccupied McMansion or two. Let me explain this more (and this isn't illegal or anything): you basically go on ReMax or whatever and find a few (empty) houses for sale, there will be tons of them in suburbia, and call to schedule a viewing. I'm not sure if they build houses like this in Europe, but from friends that have done deployments in most other places in the world, the McMansion is a truly American experience. Just a thought. It would kill an afternoon.
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