Head-Fi.org › Forums › Summit-Fi (High-End Audio) › High-end Audio Forum › Is it true that modded T50RP's (specifically LFF's Paradox mod) is comparable to high end headphones such as the LCD2?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Is it true that modded T50RP's (specifically LFF's Paradox mod) is comparable to high end... - Page 14

post #196 of 283

Is the velour pad feel more comfortable than the 003 pad?

post #197 of 283
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fifen View Post

Is the velour pad feel more comfortable than the 003 pad?


To me...no.

post #198 of 283

Regarding the comparison between the Paradox and LCD-2, the two are pretty much polar opposites. The former is about as linear as you can get, with the utmost transparency and faithfulness to how things are recorded. The LCD-2 by comparison is heavily colored, with a thick and rich sound and shelved treble, giving it an overall darker and more euphonic sound compared to the Paradox. The bass on the LCD-2 is a bit lumbering and sluggish compared to the Paradox, which doesn't have as much heft, but is faster and tighter, better controlled and textured.

post #199 of 283

not sure if anyone has posted this but, seems on topic

"Bottom line: I think LF is squeezing about as much as can be squeezed from the stock ear piece housings of the T50RP. I don't think DIYers can expect much better performance from the T50RP with stock earpieces. The good news is that LLF's cans sound pretty good. A little uneven perhaps, but nicely warm and punchy, with a treble that's under control. With patience and practice DIYers can get quite good sound from this classic headphone." - Tyll Hertsens

post #200 of 283

I think so too. But put in custom cups, baffles, housings, etc. and it becomes a $900 headphone given the small quantities being produced.

post #201 of 283
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrislangley4253 View Post

not sure if anyone has posted this but, seems on topic

"Bottom line: I think LF is squeezing about as much as can be squeezed from the stock ear piece housings of the T50RP. I don't think DIYers can expect much better performance from the T50RP with stock earpieces. The good news is that LLF's cans sound pretty good. A little uneven perhaps, but nicely warm and punchy, with a treble that's under control. With patience and practice DIYers can get quite good sound from this classic headphone." - Tyll Hertsens

 

If the Paradox is uneven, honestly I'd like to know what an even headphone is so I can go buy it tomorrow. At least as far as closed headphones are concerned, the Paradox schools everything I've ever encountered in "evenness". Using expensive wooden housings also wouldn't automatically get you better balance either, see Thunderpants. They might improve imaging and headstage a bit, but other than that I think the Paradox is using pretty much 100% of what's available from the T50RP driver.

 

To do better I think you'd need either some out of production ortho like the Aiwa HP-500 if the distortion could be cleaned up with mods, or a totally new design.

post #202 of 283
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveBSC View Post

 

If the Paradox is uneven, honestly I'd like to know what an even headphone is so I can go buy it tomorrow. At least as far as closed headphones are concerned, the Paradox schools everything I've ever encountered in "evenness". Using expensive wooden housings also wouldn't automatically get you better balance either, see Thunderpants. They might improve imaging and headstage a bit, but other than that I think the Paradox is using pretty much 100% of what's available from the T50RP driver.

 

To do better I think you'd need either some out of production ortho like the Aiwa HP-500 if the distortion could be cleaned up with mods, or a totally new design.

Which open headphones were more even than the paradox?
 

The housing matters a lot with open headphones. I can't speak for closed ones.. But, I'd lean towards yes. The dampening is just more important.


I can't wait to get my hands on a pair of these and post some impressions. I'm not sure what to even expect anymore, which is great. It should be fun seeing if they sound "even" to me, or if it just makes my music bland, or maybe they will be right up my alley and sound "natural" which is my personal, difficult goal when it comes to headphones. I just want things to sound right :P

post #203 of 283
Quote:
Originally Posted by purrin View Post

I think so too. But put in custom cups, baffles, housings, etc. and it becomes a $900 headphone given the small quantities being produced.

 

A mate of mine who is famous for taking old computers and turning them into custom works of art prior to that used to work on cars. It's kind of obvious, when you think about it, but using methods one would on a custom car on the headphones is a clever idea. 

post #204 of 283
Quote:
Originally Posted by Currawong View Post

 

A mate of mine who is famous for taking old computers and turning them into custom works of art prior to that used to work on cars. It's kind of obvious, when you think about it, but using methods one would on a custom car on the headphones is a clever idea. 

I'm intrigued by the sound of your friends art. Any links or pictures or anything? It just sounds up my alley :)

 

About the car thing, tons of headphone manufacturers have borrowed from the car world for aesthetics.. I wonder if any have borrowed in other ways? It's fun to think of possible ways they might have.

post #205 of 283
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrislangley4253 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Currawong View Post

 

A mate of mine who is famous for taking old computers and turning them into custom works of art prior to that used to work on cars. It's kind of obvious, when you think about it, but using methods one would on a custom car on the headphones is a clever idea. 

I'm intrigued by the sound of your friends art. Any links or pictures or anything? It just sounds up my alley :)

 

About the car thing, tons of headphone manufacturers have borrowed from the car world for aesthetics.. I wonder if any have borrowed in other ways? It's fun to think of possible ways they might have.

 

Looks like HardOCP reset their case mod forums (or their forums entirely) after I remember he posted his builds. Pity, because he was very good at it. 

post #206 of 283
Quote:
Originally Posted by Currawong View Post

 

Looks like HardOCP reset their case mod forums (or their forums entirely) after I remember he posted his builds. Pity, because he was very good at it. 

 

I was kind of looking forward to seeing those pictures too, that sort-of thing intrigues me!

Oh well. Anyways, back on topic, I think I'm going to place my order for a pair of paradox this week!! :D

post #207 of 283
Bumping this topic to give subjective impressions on the Paradox I've had for about a week now. I was the one that ordered the first "trooper" version which appears on the Paradox website. Here's a crappy picture:



I think it would be best if I wrote a comparison of the Paradox with my other headphones. My setup at the moment is a Cambridge Azur 840C using balanced outputs to a Schiit Mjolnir, or a Dacport LX to the Mjolnir. I also have an HE-6 and an HD580 with APSv3 cables. When comparing the HD580 to the Paradox, the Paradox has less ringing, sounds much faster and has more detailed mids. although for brighter recordings I still prefer the HD580. The Paradox also sounds more open, and has an arguably wider soundstage.

Compared to the HE-6, the Paradox has a more balanced sound to it. It's like comparing a speakers tuned for "audiophiles" to a pair of mini monitors with linear response meant for use in studios (I'd rather not name brands). When listening to orchestral music, I enjoyed the HE-6 more because the midrage seemed to have more presence or "weight", and the soundstage had better depth. Instrument separation was more noticeable on the HE-6, even though the width of the presentation seemed to be about the same. The HE-6 also has a more airy sound and treble sparkle. When listening to jazz vocals I felt the HE-6 was simply more adept at detail retrieval, even if the Paradox wasn't far behind. However. when listening to other genres I feel that the HE-6 can sound a little bright out of the Mjolnir, and because of this the Paradox is the better general purpose headphone, especially when listening in a noisy environment (like I do every night with the air conditioner on) because of the weather here in the Philippines. I'd also like to note that differences I noticed in most cases were quite small, and I'm still finding it hard to believe that I just compared a modified $75 headphone favorably to a $1k headphone.

Other random notes on the Paradox:

- I brought it to a meet yesterday and in general, the guys that heard it thought it lacked bass. Personally I think its just right.
- The comfort is fantastic, but sometimes I have a difficult time getting a proper seal because the headband seems to be looser than the stock.
- It sounds nothing like an LCD-2. It's closer to an HD800 or an HE-6.
- It also sounds very different from the stock T50RP and all other mods I've heard so far.
- It does clssical music really well.
- It sounds like an open headphone
- Another picture of the Paradox: http://i.imgur.com/tLFc3.jpg
post #208 of 283
Quote:
Originally Posted by applehead View Post

Bumping this topic to give subjective impressions on the Paradox I've had for about a week now. I was the one that ordered the first "trooper" version which appears on the Paradox website. Here's a crappy picture:

I think it would be best if I wrote a comparison of the Paradox with my other headphones. My setup at the moment is a Cambridge Azur 840C using balanced outputs to a Schiit Mjolnir, or a Dacport LX to the Mjolnir. I also have an HE-6 and an HD580 with APSv3 cables. When comparing the HD580 to the Paradox, the Paradox has less ringing, sounds much faster and has more detailed mids. although for brighter recordings I still prefer the HD580. The Paradox also sounds more open, and has an arguably wider soundstage.
Compared to the HE-6, the Paradox has a more balanced sound to it. It's like comparing a speakers tuned for "audiophiles" to a pair of mini monitors with linear response meant for use in studios (I'd rather not name brands). When listening to orchestral music, I enjoyed the HE-6 more because the midrage seemed to have more presence or "weight", and the soundstage had better depth. Instrument separation was more noticeable on the HE-6, even though the width of the presentation seemed to be about the same. The HE-6 also has a more airy sound and treble sparkle. When listening to jazz vocals I felt the HE-6 was simply more adept at detail retrieval, even if the Paradox wasn't far behind. However. when listening to other genres I feel that the HE-6 can sound a little bright out of the Mjolnir, and because of this the Paradox is the better general purpose headphone, especially when listening in a noisy environment (like I do every night with the air conditioner on) because of the weather here in the Philippines. I'd also like to note that differences I noticed in most cases were quite small, and I'm still finding it hard to believe that I just compared a modified $75 headphone favorably to a $1k headphone.
Other random notes on the Paradox:
- I brought it to a meet yesterday and in general, the guys that heard it thought it lacked bass. Personally I think its just right.
- The comfort is fantastic, but sometimes I have a difficult time getting a proper seal because the headband seems to be looser than the stock.
- It sounds nothing like an LCD-2. It's closer to an HD800 or an HE-6.
- It also sounds very different from the stock T50RP and all other mods I've heard so far.
- It does clssical music really well.
- It sounds like an open headphone
- Another picture of the Paradox: http://i.imgur.com/tLFc3.jpg


Thank you for your impression.
post #209 of 283
Quote:
Originally Posted by applehead View Post

Bumping this topic to give subjective impressions on the Paradox I've had for about a week now. I was the one that ordered the first "trooper" version which appears on the Paradox website. Here's a crappy picture:

I think it would be best if I wrote a comparison of the Paradox with my other headphones. My setup at the moment is a Cambridge Azur 840C using balanced outputs to a Schiit Mjolnir, or a Dacport LX to the Mjolnir. I also have an HE-6 and an HD580 with APSv3 cables. When comparing the HD580 to the Paradox, the Paradox has less ringing, sounds much faster and has more detailed mids. although for brighter recordings I still prefer the HD580. The Paradox also sounds more open, and has an arguably wider soundstage.
Compared to the HE-6, the Paradox has a more balanced sound to it. It's like comparing a speakers tuned for "audiophiles" to a pair of mini monitors with linear response meant for use in studios (I'd rather not name brands). When listening to orchestral music, I enjoyed the HE-6 more because the midrage seemed to have more presence or "weight", and the soundstage had better depth. Instrument separation was more noticeable on the HE-6, even though the width of the presentation seemed to be about the same. The HE-6 also has a more airy sound and treble sparkle. When listening to jazz vocals I felt the HE-6 was simply more adept at detail retrieval, even if the Paradox wasn't far behind. However. when listening to other genres I feel that the HE-6 can sound a little bright out of the Mjolnir, and because of this the Paradox is the better general purpose headphone, especially when listening in a noisy environment (like I do every night with the air conditioner on) because of the weather here in the Philippines. I'd also like to note that differences I noticed in most cases were quite small, and I'm still finding it hard to believe that I just compared a modified $75 headphone favorably to a $1k headphone.
Other random notes on the Paradox:
- I brought it to a meet yesterday and in general, the guys that heard it thought it lacked bass. Personally I think its just right.
- The comfort is fantastic, but sometimes I have a difficult time getting a proper seal because the headband seems to be looser than the stock.
- It sounds nothing like an LCD-2. It's closer to an HD800 or an HE-6.
- It also sounds very different from the stock T50RP and all other mods I've heard so far.
- It does clssical music really well.
- It sounds like an open headphone
- Another picture of the Paradox: http://i.imgur.com/tLFc3.jpg

 

 

That white looks really good.  

 

As for the perceived lack of bass.  What I've found is that if the track calls for bass or a bass heavy session then the Paradox will deliver.  If the track does not have any bass attack in it then the Paradox will not give you any added or fake bass.  

 

What you give the Paradox it will give it right back to you.

post #210 of 283
Quote:
Originally Posted by preproman View Post

As for the perceived lack of bass.  What I've found is that if the track calls for bass or a bass heavy session then the Paradox will deliver.  If the track does not have any bass attack in it then the Paradox will not give you any added or fake bass.  

 

What you give the Paradox it will give it right back to you.

 

That's exactly my experience. The Paradox is bass neutral, and because SO few headphones are like that, I think people will be surprised by its chameleon-like nature. It neither ads nor removes any bass. As the EA tagline goes "if it's in the game, it's in the game". If it's on the track, you'll hear it.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: High-end Audio Forum
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Summit-Fi (High-End Audio) › High-end Audio Forum › Is it true that modded T50RP's (specifically LFF's Paradox mod) is comparable to high end headphones such as the LCD2?