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Does power rating - 'Watts' in hi fi equipment mean anything?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I have a Logitech Z-5500 surround system (for my PC) and NAD 355BEE integrated amplifier.

 

The logitech Z-5500 surround sound system specification/Advertisement says:

Total power output is 505 watts RMS, 188 of which are dedicated to the subwoofer

 

NAD 355BEE integrated amplifier's specification says:

2 x 50W Minimum Continuous Power into 4 / 8 ohms

 

Question 1

Does this mean logitech Z-5500 surround system produce 5 time more powerful sound?

 

Question 2

Does this mean logitech Z-5500 consume 5 times (or more) electricity compared to the NAD integrated amplifer?

 

Question 3

My friends say after 10 years' use of Hi-Fi speakers, because the cones (and other parts) of the speakers wear out, I need to buy a new pair of speakers to continue listening good sound quality music. Is this also true with the integrated amplifiers? Do parts/components inside the integrated amplifiers also wear out after several years of use?

 

 

Thanks,


Edited by KoalaNPanda - 6/11/12 at 10:58pm
post #2 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoalaNPanda View Post

I have a Logitech Z-5500 surround system (for my PC) and NAD 355BEE integrated amplifier.

 

The logitech Z-5500 surround sound system specification/Advertisement says:

Total power output is 505 watts RMS, 188 of which are dedicated to the subwoofer

 

NAD 355BEE integrated amplifier's specification says:

2 x 50W Minimum Continuous Power into 4 / 8 ohms

 

Question 1

Does this mean logitech Z-5500 surround system produce 5 time more powerful sound?

 

Question 2

Does this mean logitech Z-5500 consume 5 times (or more) electricity compared to the NAD integrated amplifer?

 

Question 3

My friends say after 10 years' use of Hi-Fi speakers, because the cones (and other parts) of the speakers wear out, I need to buy a new pair of speakers to continue listening good sound quality music. Is this also true with the integrated amplifiers? Do parts/components inside the integrated amplifiers also wear out after several years of use?

 

 

Thanks,

 

1.   Logitech's numbers are probably grossed inflated.   NADs numbers are usually fairly conservative. I would assume that NAD equipment is far better than Logitech.

 

2.    depends on the efficiency and design of the amplifier, in addition it depends on how loud you listen.   And as I said before, Logitech's numbers are probably grossly inflated.

 

3.  Cone surrounds tend to wear out, but I have only had problems with woofer surrounds wearing out. Might take as long as 15 years.

Amps can last a long time, 20-30 years, but after a while you have to replace the electrolytic caps.

post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thank you for your answers bigsmile_face.gif

post #4 of 8
Hey!

No problem!tongue.gif
post #5 of 8
I have 1970s JBL 10 inch woofers in my system and they still work great. I'd be lost without them.

Logitech is adding all of the channels together, so subtract the amount dedicated to the sub and divide the remainder by five for te rest of the channels. That puts it at about 60 watts. Not very different.
Edited by bigshot - 6/12/12 at 11:31pm
post #6 of 8

My dad just gave me some Boston towers that he never used from the early 2000s and work fine. We also pulled out some Kefc40s from the attic he got in the 80s after college that were powered by his old carver mxr 900 amp of the same age. The carver works still as do the Kefs. It all depends on how hard you run your stuff I suppose. 

I have heard good things about that NAD.

post #7 of 8

As bigshot said, the other thing is that the Logitech is 500ish watts, broken into 5 channels - if using it with just two speakers and no subwoofer, you are dividing the remaining 300 watts over 4 channels, I would assume 100 each for the mains, and 50 each for the surround.

 

The NAD is 2x50 or 50 per channel. 

 

So really, it's an inflated 75-100 per channel, versus a true 50 per channel. 

 

And for what it is worth, I'd take the NAD any day. 

 

As a further, for what it's worth - You can fill even a biggish room with a LOT of sound, in the 10-20 watt range. My "big" home rig doesn't run more than 40 watts. 


Edited by liamstrain - 6/14/12 at 9:00am
post #8 of 8

+1 for NAD

 

You can probably find a used NAD integrated amp for $100-200 on eBay or Craigslist. In case you don't know NAD is famous for making some of the best integrated amps back in the day. Definitely worth the used price tag, and will be push any average speaker you throw at it.

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