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post #1261 of 4523
Thinking on it that makes so much sense, The PF's really give an out of the head experience so combine that with a game..
You just made me think as on first reading your post I thought you meant the game was 3D ( I don't game though I do use X-Plane to practice flying) I wonder what they would be like using them to watch a 3D movie, anyone have a 3DTV?
post #1262 of 4523
Quote:
Originally Posted by ianmedium View Post

Thinking on it that makes so much sense, The PF's really give an out of the head experience so combine that with a game..
You just made me think as on first reading your post I thought you meant the game was 3D ( I don't game though I do use X-Plane to practice flying) I wonder what they would be like using them to watch a 3D movie, anyone have a 3DTV?

 

It is really an out of head experience. The game is actually glasses-less full 3D.

post #1263 of 4523

W00t, yet another John Denver fan here.

 

Speaking of church and music, there was a live album released here in Hong Kong and that should be recorded entirely in a local church. That AQCD (Analog Quality Compact Disc) with some fancy purple silver alloy stuff was supposed to sound like audiophile quality but finally I just kept reading disappointing reviews.

 

534677_254845527977922_414751118_n.jpg

I might actually get that AQCD just for the heck of it and try some songs with my DC1601SS. Those were old school Cantonese songs and I probably heard some of them a long time ago.

post #1264 of 4523
Quote:
Originally Posted by walkmanrocks13 View Post

Okay, this is the last post OT, but if you want to hear a fantastic CD recorded in a church, check out The Coryells (album is same name), recorded in 2000. Amazing sound, amazing musicians (Larry Coryell, his two sons, and a couple of other incredible jazz fusion players). I don't have FADs, but I bet this album would be a winner on them if you like jazz. Sorry for the sidetrack.

 

There is a 24/96 version available at HDTracks. I will check it out. 

post #1265 of 4523
Quote:
Originally Posted by ianmedium View Post

OK, dark little secret that many will scoff at but I care not as his music got me through a number of childhood and mid life family traumas, John Denver!

His lyrics have always struck a cord with me and to this day after litterally thousands of live concerts I have attended his one that I saw in the UK a week after my Mum died stands head and shoulders as the best live performance I have ever seen.

His band were all first class musicians, they all knew each other so well that the instrumental communications between them were telepathic. Three and a half hours was his set length, no breaks, just the occasional talk between the music. But I must admit it remains special not only for those reasons but also that a friend of mine who managed the venue and who had got me a front seat ticket knowing it was just what I needed after mums passing had unbeknownst to me told John a bit about what had happened. ( I had nursed my mum through a terminal illness for almost eight years)

There I was enjoying the performance and suddenly he calls my name and tells me to come up on stage! He tells the audience what I had done and what had occurred, sat me on his stool center stage and proceeded to sing me sunshine on my shoulder! I was a gibbering wreck and will never ever forget his kindness and compassion in doing that!

You know, reading back on this thread I have forgotten how fortunate I have been and how much music means to the fabric of my life..

 

Wow, I almost overlooked your post, what a touching story and well worth being quoted once more! smile_phones.gif

 

As far as I am concerned, there's nothing to scoff at, I've always liked John Denver's straightforward songs and his 1976 "Live in London" album still holds its place in my record collection as one of the best live albums of that period.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by walkmanrocks13 View Post

Okay, this is the last post OT, but if you want to hear a fantastic CD recorded in a church, check out The Coryells (album is same name), recorded in 2000. Amazing sound, amazing musicians (Larry Coryell, his two sons, and a couple of other incredible jazz fusion players). I don't have FADs, but I bet this album would be a winner on them if you like jazz. Sorry for the sidetrack.

 

Thanks for the tip!

 

Speaking of "in church" recordings, here's another one that's being scoffed at as mindless new age by some, but actually strikes a deep chord in me when I'm in the right mood.

"Officium", a collaboration between Norwegian saxophonist Jan Garbarek and the British Hilliard Ensemble, recorded in the Austrian monastery of St. Gerold back in 1994:

 

post #1266 of 4523
Quote:
Originally Posted by ianmedium View Post

In the rap genre I really like the later Eminem stuff, I also like little Wayne, I think some of their lyrics are pure gold

As to albums one warms to over time there are so many that I heard when young and could not stand that now stand out as all time favorites. Personally I have always been a person who likes diverse genre's of music but must admit classical has always been a constant for me, it never seems to fade and in fact as I get older and appreciate artists more I am now listening to really avant garde classical that I would have never given house room to in the past.

OK, dark little secret that many will scoff at but I care not as his music got me through a number of childhood and mid life family traumas, John Denver!

His lyrics have always struck a cord with me and to this day after litterally thousands of live concerts I have attended his one that I saw in the UK a week after my Mum died stands head and shoulders as the best live performance I have ever seen.

His band were all first class musicians, they all knew each other so well that the instrumental communications between them were telepathic. Three and a half hours was his set length, no breaks, just the occasional talk between the music. But I must admit it remains special not only for those reasons but also that a friend of mine who managed the venue and who had got me a front seat ticket knowing it was just what I needed after mums passing had unbeknownst to me told John a bit about what had happened. ( I had nursed my mum through a terminal illness for almost eight years)

There I was enjoying the performance and suddenly he calls my name and tells me to come up on stage! He tells the audience what I had done and what had occurred, sat me on his stool center stage and proceeded to sing me sunshine on my shoulder! I was a gibbering wreck and will never ever forget his kindness and compassion in doing that!

You know, reading back on this thread I have forgotten how fortunate I have been and how much music means to the fabric of my life..

 

Ian, it's been over 24 hrs since you posted the above—thanks again for doing do—and some of your words have resonated with me several times today. I feel now able to make a few comments.

I'll start by quoting the very last words of your post: "…how fortunate I have been and how much music means to the fabric of my life.." ---- You may remember a few days ago my short reply to Charles' unfortunate post (TP thread) where I said to him that, "to me, Music—Music with a capital M—is a little more than mere enjoyment." Fortunately—and sometimes unfortunately—this really is the case. Unfortunately because everywhere I go and there's music being played, no matter how quietly in the background, I cannot ignore it; not great because plenty of the music I hear when out and about does not appeal to me. Even when watching TV, I cannot ignore the music on adverts or background music on so many programmes (including the news) or films. I often get 'offended' at how frequently music is used AND abused to cause an emotional response in people, ie to manipulate people's emotions and instincts. This, try as I might, I cannot ignore. On the upside, Music (with a capital M) has sustained me several times in my life.

I won't go into details, but when my own mother passed away, for a period of about 3 weeks I found it very hard to function — though she was ill, her passing was very sudden, unexpected, and came as a real shock to all of us. To my surprise, the only thing during that period that helped me get through the day were two pieces of music I didn't listen to very frequently, particularly the second one: the first was a Haydn string quartet (all 4 movements), and the other was PG's I Grieve. I'd get home and the only thing my system needed was that music, the only music during those 3 weeks that gave me enough energy / light to function. No words or the  company of anyone, no book, no TV, just those two pieces of music were the real oxygen that I seemed to need. I tried other music the first few days but nothing had such a positive cleansing / healing effect, so I simply stopped trying any other music and would listen to either on repeat mode, sometimes for 2-4 hours.

There have been other key moments in my life where Music (with a capital M) has been there for me. There have been other times where I've intentionally gone on a music fast, but that's another story.

 

 


 

 

Idsynchrono, I'll respond to your post in more detail at a later stage. FYI, one of my favourite albums last year was "Tokyo Collection" by Tokyo Jihen (the only album I've enjoyed by the band, btw)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Idsynchrono_24 View Post

Finally, I'm glad to see you back Music, I've missed seeing you round these parts smily_headphones1.gif

 

    :)

 

 


 

 

FWIW, my 'church music' recommendation with the PF IXs is Travis & Fripp: "Live at Coventry Cathedral" (2010)


Edited by music_4321 - 4/12/13 at 2:52pm
post #1267 of 4523

This is, IMO, the best version of one of my favorite tracks. The lyrics mean a lot to me, and the way James Morrison maneuvers his voice makes me close my eyes and draw it in.

 

I forgot to listen to it with the Piano Forte when it was in my possession. Would one of you mind giving it a listen, so I can live vicariously through your impressions?

 

post #1268 of 4523

You guys really are special and I've gotta add this

 

 

http://evacassidy.org/eva/wordmagazine.pdf

 

 

"It was the single most inspirational moment of my life."

 

 

http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/evacassidy/message/4435

 

 

 

Quote:
 

He [Chris Biondo] tells a story about the time in June 1996


 

when she played at Borders books in Rockville,


Maryland. “A lady came up and said, Can I have


your home address? I want to write you a letter.


And the letter said, ‘My husband died and I


have been depressed and after seeing you play


I have begun to live my life again because I


know that the world is a beautiful place.’ How


could you not be touched by that?”

 

 


 

 

I think that story is so powerful. And I believe there are letters
written like that every day -- all over the world. Still. To Eva.
They may no longer be sent to her correct address, but they are being
written, some are even being sent. Here's one I received not long ago.=20
It's from a fellow that refers to himself as an "old cowboy" (I have his
permission to share this.):

 

 

"Hi Linda,

 

 

Here we go: I had two surgeries in a 12 month period and the second one
really knocked me down hard(intestinal/colon surgeriey. I was
recuperating for about 6 months and still wasnt well/healed..... it was
a REALLY bad situation.


One day... when I was feeling particularly not well and depressed about
my situation(the doctors had said I had about a 20% of dying) someone
forwarded to me and I saw a video of Connie, the little girl from
Britains Got Talent. She sang "OVER THE RAINBOW". It was AWESOME.....but
off to the right I saw several other artists videos for the same song
and I scrolled down and I saw Evas. I clicked it on to Eva Cassidys
songs but then for some reason I clicked on "Fields of Gold" first.

 

 

I read a lil of the "history/story/ and then I watched Eva sing "Over
the Rainbow"...

 

 

I was reduced to tears, and I dont mean those lil crocodile tears
either....I mean rivers of gut wrenching, souls seaching I cant believe
this is happening tears. I had been literally sick and depressed and
completely bedridden for months... but Eva Cassidy's singing and story
so inspired me that the next day I got up at 6 am and about walked two
miles, came back home and had a full workout, and actually picked up my
guitar, which I had not touched in a year because of the illness and
started playing music again...... and I have been playing music and
recuperating nicely every since.

 

 

It was the single most inspirational moment of my life.

 

 

It may have actually saved my life, you just never know, but it probably
did.

 

 

I hope this was'nt too long but you asked if I would share and I did. "

 

 

Submitted by Linda

 

 

P.S. Last week I received a followup note from him and he's been playing
in his band (he's the lead singer and plays acoustic guitar) all over
Texas and "having a BLAST"!

 

 

 


 

These guestbook pages are some of the most incredible stories available online

 

 

http://evacassidy.org/eva/guestbookarchivepageone.shtml

 

 

http://users3.smartgb.com/g/g.php?a=s&i=g32-02376-6c

 

 

post #1269 of 4523
Just found this on Taobao:

http://item.taobao.com/item.htm?spm=a230r.1.14.19.4Pah3R&id=19524455100

Do you think there is any chance that these might actually be genuine (@ approx. GBP 120)? Are you aware of any fakes in circulation?
post #1270 of 4523
Music.. Your post says it all, I thank you for sharing such personal things and I know exactly what you mean!

It is also wonderful to see other appreciators of John's music. From a HiFi stand point it is also really well recorded which is a bonus but so much of what is written by him is exemplified in this particular thread, decency, honesty and yes, beauty, thanks folks. I have said it before on other threads but will repeat it here once again. No matter what people think of the technical aspects of this companies products I have yet to see another thread on this forum talk and share with such passion music, personal experiences and thoughts. I think that speaks volumes about what these products allow us to access in the music we listen to.

I think in part it is a cultural design thing as personally I find Japanese products more than most others infused with that thing that cannot be measured of quantified.. Soul!

And talking of soul..

i have had this album for years but just downloaded the 24/96 version which is a beautiful version
post #1271 of 4523
Very fishy.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CJG888 View Post

Just found this on Taobao:

http://item.taobao.com/item.htm?spm=a230r.1.14.19.4Pah3R&id=19524455100

Do you think there is any chance that these might actually be genuine (@ approx. GBP 120)? Are you aware of any fakes in circulation?
post #1272 of 4523
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idsynchrono_24 View Post

I didn't mean this as a slight against Kanye actually, more as a means of rationalizing the difference between Good Kid and MBDTF. Kanye has the raw ability from his producer background and his delusions of grandeur lead him to push the envelope in the realm of pop music. He once said something to the effect of wanting to become the most important figure in pop music, and since he is quite obsessed with the former genre hopping king of pop. Michael Jackson, it's natural that his music would be bolder than that found in Good Kid. It's also perfectly valid to feel that the music within Good Kid is too basic, but I feel the music from that album serves its purpose within the context of the "story" it tells. It possesses this sleazy ambiance that paints the mad city of Compton quite well IMO.

 

Interesting and very well articulated thoughts. For me the problem here lies with the word "rationalizing". We often tend to rationalise things, practically everything, even in a world where rationalisation cannot easily be applied, or is pretty limiting: creativity. KW's ego & "delusions of grandeur" may well be too obvious and an undisputed fact, but this alone, to me, does not explain certain very creative elements found in "MBDTF", which, to me, are outside the world of egos, or lack thereof. However, these very human traits / flaws may mean that MBDTF was a one-off, at least a one-off in a creative sense, though not necessarily in the commercial (read: good sales) sense.

 

Quote:
I appreciate the Peter Gabriel anecdote as well. I quite enjoyed the sinister and off kilter sounding "Intruder." As I've never actually explored Gabriel's catalogue, I'll make sure to seek out some of his work in the future. smily_headphones1.gif

 

If by any chance you do end up exploring the music of PG, and FWIW, my personal favourites are his 3rd and 4th albums (1980 & 1982), the latter (my all-time favourite PG album) released 4 years before the hugely successful (at the time) "So" album (1986). It took years for the penny to drop and for me "to get" his 2nd album (1978), his most raw, less polished, and least commercially successful album (the producer of the album was—thankfully—hugely responsible for this).

 

Quote:
And since we're recommending stuff, you ought to check out Shiina Ringo's concept album "Karuki, Samen, Kuri no Hana" (Chlorine, Semen, Chestnut Flower) sometime. I can't say with total conviction that you'd enjoy it, but that you'd at least perhaps find it interesting. It's not particularly well recorded as I understand Shiina recorded a large amount of the instruments on a MacBook in her home to save on production costs, but it's pretty much a distillation of her ego into 44 minutes and 44 seconds, and is definitely one of my all time favorite albums. (If you do seek it out, try to find the album as a whole rather than listening to individual songs, as there is a definite and deliberate flow to it)

 

Unfortunately, that one's not available on Spotify or iTunes. Any idea where I can get to listen to it?

 

Quote:
Anyway, as for myself, it took me an embarrassingly long time to come around to the understanding that music doesn't necessarily need hooks to be good, as some music isn't so much about evoking pleasure as it is about transporting the listener into a realm occupied by the artist. (like say, Fever Ray)

 

Things do take time, sometimes an unnecessarily long time, but sometimes it's a very good a good thing they take so long, when perhaps it is not only the right time for us to "get it", but are perhaps more mature to appreciate such music / art and maybe even do something with and/or about it.

 

Quote:
Someone posted in MF's diary thread recently that he derived a lot of pleasure from the simple chord structure of Yo La Tengo's "The Story of Yo La Tango" and I'd have to agree with his sentiment.

 

Yes, I happened to catch that post (I skip most posts in that thread, but did catch that one). In some ways the music reminded me a lot of some of the music by Fripp & Eno, particularly "No Pussyfooting" (1973) & "Evening Star" (1975) and I could see Yo La Tengo had clearly been influenced by said albums / artists. "No Pussyfooting" would likely be among my top 10 desert island discs. The story behind the release and non-release of that album, and how it was recorded is quite an interesting one. This is yet another album that took me years to fully appreciate and understand.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by seeteeyou View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

You guys really are special and I've gotta add this

 

 

http://evacassidy.org/eva/wordmagazine.pdf

 

 

"It was the single most inspirational moment of my life."

 

 

http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/evacassidy/message/4435

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

These guestbook pages are some of the most incredible stories available online

 

 

http://evacassidy.org/eva/guestbookarchivepageone.shtml

 

 

http://users3.smartgb.com/g/g.php?a=s&i=g32-02376-6c

 

 

 

 

 

I still remember one Xmas when my late father gave me Eva Cassidy's "Songbird"; he was fully into classical music and would buy the odd jazz & easy-listening pop-ish CD now and again. I was surprised he'd not given me a classical CD, or one CD I might have hinted at previously. When I looked at the "Songbird" cover, I was even more surprised and thought, "Was this really meant for me?". He knew I'd give it a fair listen regardless and give him my honest take on it. Loved the album — what a gifted person Eva Cassidy was, such a pure voice! And effortless!! She also seemed like a genuinely wonderful person.

 


 

Eke, there seems to be something wrong with the link you posted.
 


Edited by music_4321 - 4/13/13 at 12:37pm
post #1273 of 4523
Quote:
Originally Posted by CJG888 View Post

Just found this on Taobao:

http://item.taobao.com/item.htm?spm=a230r.1.14.19.4Pah3R&id=19524455100

Do you think there is any chance that these might actually be genuine (@ approx. GBP 120)? Are you aware of any fakes in circulation?

 

I know of one fellow member who bought a pair of PF VIIIs on eBay, which turned out to be fake. Hope he doesn't mind me quoting from his PM:

 

Quote:
For one, there was such bad resonance that both earpieces would rattle very badly with even the slightest bass impact! Everything sounded like a complete mess! I can't imagine the drivers they (the counterfeit) use, but they're downright terrible! When I confronted the seller, he stopped responding, took down his remaining FAD auctions, and now even the listing has been removed from eBay! It was all too obvious from the get go, because they honestly sounded worse than the stock Apple earbuds (the older generation; I haven't heard the latest rendition).
 
...
 
Counterfeit FAD's do exist, at least in Hong Kong. To make matters worse, the packaging that FAD uses has such washed out colors, that even the original packaging appears counterfeit. Very poorly done on their part, especially when one considers their cost.
post #1274 of 4523
Quote:
Originally Posted by music_4321 View Post

A few days ago someone called the PF IXs "crap" in a different thread. Today I got an email from a fellow HF'er, someone who's heard some of the very best TOTL gear around (SR-009, HD800,  etc) and said the same thing, that the PFs were crap, though he was even harsher (possibly because this was a private email exchange) calling the PFs "a s**t product" and adding the F word in reference to the treble. He tried the PF VIII, but I don't think his view of the PF IX would be all that different.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by james444 View Post

I know of one fellow member who bought a pair of PF VIIIs on eBay, which turned out to be fake. Hope he doesn't mind me quoting from his PM:

 

Perhaps those fellow HF'ers I mentioned got a fake PF VIII loaner! Or the originals were mysteriously swapped for fake ones.  ;)

 

On a very slightly more serious note, £120 for a new pair of PF VIIIs (or even a second-hand pair in good condition) has "FAKE" written all over it.


Edited by music_4321 - 4/13/13 at 12:53pm
post #1275 of 4523
Quote:
Originally Posted by music_4321 View Post

 

Eke, there seems to be something wrong with the link you posted.
 

 

Whoops. Here's the link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OayhO9K7LDs

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