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post #2041 of 2864

A good starter unit indeed.... I'd like to start there! No additional info here, not beyond the sales lit!

post #2042 of 2864
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rem1x View Post
 

It is the marantz tt-15s1.  One ground goes underneath connected to chassis and then another that is part of the RCA's.  Do i have something confused I am guessing haha


Nope..according to the user manual, you have it right

http://us.marantz.com/DocumentMaster/US/DFU_TT-15S1_eng.pdf

 

Never saw a TT with two ground wires but you are definitely not grounded.

 

Okay, so your RCA's are plugged in to a PHONO jack, yes ? And the ground wires to a ground lug (labeled) on an amp ?

 

Also try switching the outlet plug to a different plug

post #2043 of 2864

Yea RCA's are plugged into a phono preamp and then into my headphone amp.  Both ground cables are plugged into grounding lugs.

post #2044 of 2864

Its pretty strange constant buzz, and like I said it gets louder when I touch certain parts of the TT.

post #2045 of 2864
Thread Starter 
Try disconnecting one of the two ground wires. Then the other. See if that helps.

What is the turntable sitting on?
post #2046 of 2864

I will try that.  It is sitting on a small wooden table.

post #2047 of 2864

Two other things sir...

 

1) Make sure the headshell collar is secure

 

2) What is the table and headphone amp plugged in to ? Do you have a computer or router on the same circuit ?

 

#2 can definitely create a hum...

post #2048 of 2864

Ok so I tried a few minor things and it seems like one slight issue has been fixed (the problem where the humming/buzzing would get louder when I touched a part of the TT) although unfortunately the buzzing still exists.  It is a Cambridge Audio 651P.  The turntable and amp are plugged into a power conditioner (Panamax M4300-PM) and I have tried plugging the Cambridge Audio preamp into the panamax and a surgeprotector with various other units also plugged in and it still produces a hum.  Next I think I will try unplugging every device not needed to play in this setup and then try it.

post #2049 of 2864

It is buzz rather than a hum does it change with volume?


Edited by JamieMcC - 1/8/14 at 11:44pm
post #2050 of 2864

The issue of PROPER grounding is always debatable - and it is very likely to be  ALWAYS case to case different.

 

In my R&D turntable, I am using MANY separate ground wires, all coming together for the very first time at the

preamp chassis ground post. The ultimate capability of this TT is 5 (in words: five ) tonearms - and if the layout of the tonearms used would allow for 5 separate grounding wires, I would have certainly used them. As it is, one of the arms has ground shared with one channel of the RCA connector by design - and there is no way around it. That arm does NOT use wires for the electrical connection to the outside world - and there simply is no place for the additional fifth well of mercury for the separate ground connection.

 

The reason for separate grounding wires (and the ungainly mess it creates ) is, obviously, to first ground everything ( motor, bearing, subchassis, ANYTHING METAL or CONDUCTIVE ) - and secondly, even more important, not to create any ground loop(s). 

 

You can use any ohm meter/multimeter to check for contuinity in the grounding. Best audio equipment has the possibility to BREAK ground connection if there is a ground loop someplace ( FM Acoustics first springs to mind, but there undoubtedly were and are others that will allow for that ). Ideally, each and every component in a "circuit" should be star grounded - that is to say, any ground returns connected to the same point. That is extremely difficult, if not physically impossible to do in a real system. 

 

Do not be surprised to find that manufacturers have cut corners in this department, skimped on making a ground connection for say a motor shield in turntables, made their components compatible with their other components only, etc, etc, etc - it is the reality.

 

I simply adore, worship, etc, the Tesla NC470 / NAD 5120 / Lenco L800 turntable. Its Aichille's heel is grounding - could not possibly have been worse than it was/is, the thing buzzes as hornet's nest. As it is, the only bearable combinations regarding hum/buzz are very low impedance cartridges with relatively high output voltage - anything run of the mill impedance wise will be objectionable, not to mention high impedance designs, which are unacceptable on this table. If and when the time will allow, I will modify this hornet's nest and document each and every step how to do it right. I will post it over on the vinyl engine forum, as this exceeds the scope of head-fi.

 

I have grown to accept zero tolerance for hum/buzz - ultimately, I want "white/pink" residual noise in any of my systems, with no hum audible as such. It is ( almost ) always doable - but never easy to achieve.

post #2051 of 2864

I'm having sylabance issues with a couple of RTI 180 gram remasters ("Graceland" and "Come Away With Me").  Is this typical of RTI or is something wrong with my cartridge alignment? I have a Rega RP3 with the Elys 2 cartridge factory installed. 

post #2052 of 2864

I'm fortunate. My kit is star-grounded; no ground running from TT to Pre. Absolute Black background, no hum no where.

post #2053 of 2864
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kent Nova View Post
 

I'm having sylabance issues with a couple of RTI 180 gram remasters ("Graceland" and "Come Away With Me").  Is this typical of RTI or is something wrong with my cartridge alignment? I have a Rega RP3 with the Elys 2 cartridge factory installed. 

I am not familiar with RTI remasters, but I doubt they would put out records with sibilance issues. What they are striving to do is to put on disc as much of the master as vinyl at the present state of the art is capable of.

 

THAT may well be the problem with playback. In order to have as good as possible signal recorded into the groove, levels have to be as high as possible, in order to achieve best possible signal to noise ratio/dynamic range. There is NO phono cartridge ever made capable of tracking what is possible to cut into the groove - and here a bit compromise is perhaps in order. HOW MUCH - in order to make playback easier - is always debatable. Unless you print in bold which cartridges are capable (correctly installed ! ) to track that record of yours - or sell the record and cart in a bundle.

 

Rega carts are no tracking ability world beaters - draw the conclusion yourselves...

 

It can perhaps be partially helpful to check for the cart instalation with a protractor and test record, to make sure you are getting max out of your present equipment - but above firmly stands.

post #2054 of 2864
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylab View Post

Try disconnecting one of the two ground wires. Then the other. See if that helps.

 

 

I have two wires from my Hydraulic Reference table.  I get best results attaching the ground from the tone arm cables but not the chassis ground.  

 

I agree, every installation is slightly different of course...

post #2055 of 2864
Quote:
Originally Posted by analogsurviver View Post
 

The issue of PROPER grounding is always debatable - and it is very likely to be  ALWAYS case to case different.

 

In my R&D turntable, I am using MANY separate ground wires, all coming together for the very first time at the

preamp chassis ground post. The ultimate capability of this TT is 5 (in words: five ) tonearms - and if the layout of the tonearms used would allow for 5 separate grounding wires, I would have certainly used them. As it is, one of the arms has ground shared with one channel of the RCA connector by design - and there is no way around it. That arm does NOT use wires for the electrical connection to the outside world - and there simply is no place for the additional fifth well of mercury for the separate ground connection.

 

The reason for separate grounding wires (and the ungainly mess it creates ) is, obviously, to first ground everything ( motor, bearing, subchassis, ANYTHING METAL or CONDUCTIVE ) - and secondly, even more important, not to create any ground loop(s). 

 

You can use any ohm meter/multimeter to check for contuinity in the grounding. Best audio equipment has the possibility to BREAK ground connection if there is a ground loop someplace ( FM Acoustics first springs to mind, but there undoubtedly were and are others that will allow for that ). Ideally, each and every component in a "circuit" should be star grounded - that is to say, any ground returns connected to the same point. That is extremely difficult, if not physically impossible to do in a real system. 

 

Do not be surprised to find that manufacturers have cut corners in this department, skimped on making a ground connection for say a motor shield in turntables, made their components compatible with their other components only, etc, etc, etc - it is the reality.

 

I simply adore, worship, etc, the Tesla NC470 / NAD 5120 / Lenco L800 turntable. Its Aichille's heel is grounding - could not possibly have been worse than it was/is, the thing buzzes as hornet's nest. As it is, the only bearable combinations regarding hum/buzz are very low impedance cartridges with relatively high output voltage - anything run of the mill impedance wise will be objectionable, not to mention high impedance designs, which are unacceptable on this table. If and when the time will allow, I will modify this hornet's nest and document each and every step how to do it right. I will post it over on the vinyl engine forum, as this exceeds the scope of head-fi.

 

I have grown to accept zero tolerance for hum/buzz - ultimately, I want "white/pink" residual noise in any of my systems, with no hum audible as such. It is ( almost ) always doable - but never easy to achieve.


GOOD POST...and so true...I have and had tables that were dead quiet on hook-up and others that I had to practically roll mountains uphill. I too have NO tolerance for hum or buzz. My biggest FOE was Dual 721 that was awesome..but always had a slight hum and that hum was also dependent on Dual's infamous headshell sled. Final solution ? Eliminated the sled contacts, rewired the arm with Litz wire and corrected (bridged) the chassis ground.

 

So how does this relate to the Marantz problem? Ground issues can be so different. Removing one of the ground wires may solve it. I would definitely check other items on your outlets because if you have a computer or router on the same circuit, it can cause this. You need to get an extension cord and two outlets. Get the Turntable plug and Phono stage plug OUT OF THAT ROOM. That way, you can validate or eliminate if the ground issue is coming from the power sources in that room. If it still hums ? Then it may just be the phone stage.

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