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Any affordable, musical USB cables out there? - Page 3  

post #31 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by goodolcheez View Post

 

Hard drive connectors in the computer doesn't apply in affecting sound. Unless the cable is cut or defect and unable to transfer data.

 

If this is true, then why (how) would a USB cable make a difference? Frankly, you are talking out of your arse.

post #32 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by liamstrain View Post

 

If this is true, then why (how) would a USB cable make a difference? Frankly, you are talking out of your arse.


Synchronous USB doesn't apply to the connectors on the hard drive.  Hard drive doesn't require a timing where the USB interconnect for DAC and speakers matter.   I'm not talking out of my arse.

 

Just because you use digital device (via USB) doesn't mean you get digital sound.  It's not that simple as you think.


Edited by goodolcheez - 6/7/12 at 10:57am
post #33 of 51

Explain how jitter and sychronous timing issues via USB cable can selectively affect only part of the frequency range (highs/mids/etc.) or harmonics, or anything other than to skip and drop signal. 

 

Also as far as I know, the vast majority of DAC use async transfer or include buffers and their own clocks. 


Edited by liamstrain - 6/7/12 at 10:59am
post #34 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by liamstrain View Post

Explain how jitter and sychronous timing issues via USB cable can selectively affect only part of the frequency range (highs/mids/etc.) or harmonics, or anything other than to skip and drop signal. 

 

Also as far as I know, the vast majority of DAC use async transfer or include buffers and their own clocks. 


I'm no scientist. I can't say exactly how they relate to particular frequency ranges but it is the timing that determines the accuracy of the original intended music.  Most (actually, virtually all) consumers audio system produce music with loss of accuracy due to the incorrect timing.

 

And I doubt that vast majority of DACs out there are async.


Edited by goodolcheez - 6/7/12 at 11:11am
post #35 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by goodolcheez View Post

You are heading the wrong direction.  The gold isn't a good conductor of choice.  It is worse than the copper.

Oh but that's just what you think. Like I said, you can't even imagine how good it sounds


And yes my computer has been custom fitted with all 24 ct gold connections. Even the power cable is silver. It's a rough life having ears that can hear the difference between a hi res flac being played through a computer with a silver power and some standard piece of junk that commoners use
Edited by Rawrbington - 6/7/12 at 11:20am
post #36 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rawrbington View Post


And yes my computer has been custom fitted with all 24 ct gold connections. Even the power cable is silver. It's a rough life having ears that can hear the difference between a hi res flac being played through a computer with a silver power and some standard piece of junk that commoners use

 

Maybe you don't have bunny ears.

post #37 of 51
No I don't have bunny ears.

These are my old speaker wires. I upgraded. The Nordost Odin cables just sounded too lifeless and dead. Couldn't stomach such boring ordinary dull sound
post #38 of 51

Most dac chips have clock rejection other protections in there to guard against timing issues and jitter (which is not as audible as most poeple think) - Adaptive mode which is most common acts this way - and many more have async circuits - my Yulong D100 (hardly high end) for instance does. These virtually eliminate the effects of jitter and timing issues. 

 

But with digital data, if the data is slewed timing wise, so far as to be affecting accuracy, the data breaks up - it cannot affect frequencies or anything relating to the original source. A 1 is still a 1, a 0 is still a 0 - cable affecting the signal enough to be audible will break up - but it will not change the sound (frequency response). 

 

Good information in here, if you want to read more. 

http://www.thewelltemperedcomputer.com/KB/USB.html

post #39 of 51

This thread title makes me smiley-laughing024.gif smiley-laughing025.gif

post #40 of 51

Personally, I think this thread is epic!!! Monoprice for teh win!!!

 

popcorn.gif

post #41 of 51
The only time I've ever even possibly maybe slim chance but could have happened heard a cable was with a really old extremely cheap RCA. And even then it was on a high end system and it was still probably all in my head.

People just getting into this have to find their own way through the sea of BS. But if I could offer any guidance it would be order some good quality but dirt cheap Monoprice cables all at the sometime to save on shipping and then forget about cables. You can revisit that option later when you have dumped your life savings into a crazy ridiculous hi end system if you still want to
post #42 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rawrbington View Post

No I don't have bunny ears.
These are my old speaker wires. I upgraded. The Nordost Odin cables just sounded too lifeless and dead. Couldn't stomach such boring ordinary dull sound

Sir, it's not my fault you don't have bunny ears.  Maybe try different speakers?  Or maybe your listening taste is just different. Don't know.

Quote:
Originally Posted by liamstrain View Post

 

But with digital data, if the data is slewed timing wise, so far as to be affecting accuracy, the data breaks up - it cannot affect frequencies or anything relating to the original source. A 1 is still a 1, a 0 is still a 0 - cable affecting the signal enough to be audible will break up - but it will not change the sound (frequency response). 

1's and 0's is where the processing takes place in the digital device. But it doesn't end there.... Everything outside that is back to analog environment.  The cable is analog. Speaker is analog too.  Jitter IS analog.   It's not that simple as 1's and 0's when the final stage ends up as analog.


Edited by goodolcheez - 6/7/12 at 3:27pm
post #43 of 51

Your argument, however is in the transfer of the data to the device. the 1s and 0s (represented by analog voltage swings - but still either a 1 or a 0, there is no "partial 1 or almost 0" - with a LOT of slop built into the USB standard - ditto the levels of acceptable latency and jitter). That's all that is affected by the USB cable. Once it is in the dac, it either reclocks, or throws out bad clock data (jitter), or if you have an older cheap dac, skips when it hits an error - no other options. Everything after that is independent of the USB cable. 

 

Did you read the link I provided? That explains all this better than I can.

 

And of course, analog cables - properly made, don't really make a difference either (with a few notable exceptions - relating to RLC and impedance in a few instances) - but that's a different conversation. 


Edited by liamstrain - 6/7/12 at 3:39pm
post #44 of 51

Adaptive mode is better than Synchronous but both has issues. Both methods still cause high levels of jitter. The computer's clock is not as stable (powerline fluctuations/RF pollution) as you would like for digital equipment to provide.

post #45 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by liamstrain View Post

 

And of course, analog cables - properly made, don't really make a difference either (with a few notable exceptions - relating to RLC and impedance in a few instances) - but that's a different conversation. 

Never mind analog cables.  The USB cable is analog too.

 

I think you're going circles already.  The materials used in the conductors and the type of insulation used on cables have large impact on sound due to the timing.

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