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How far can EQ really go towards truly equalizing headphones? - Page 14

post #196 of 204

The stereo convolver plugin for fb2k

http://www.hydrogenaudio.org/forums/index.php?showtopic=90662

 

Instruction:

Go to one of these sites to listen to various examples of recorded HRTFs. 

http://recherche.ircam.fr/equipes/salles/listen/context.html   

http://earlab.bu.edu/databases/collections/cipic/Default.aspx

 

I have personally used IRCAM's site. Find a subject whose record circles around your head in a flat plane, not going up/down, not changing distance, or at least most close to that. Download a zip with records of his HRIR's.

Go to compensated folder.

File name format is as follows:

 IRC_<subject_ID>_<status>_R<radius>_T<azimuth>_P<elevation>

R is the same for all IIRC, azimuth is the left-right angle (030 is 30 degrees to the right, 330 is 30 degrees to the left), elevation is vertical angle.

You probably won't need any elevation, and use a file that represents left speaker for the left channel (I use T330), and right speaker for right channel (T030).

The slider below is just gain, it's set by default to -6dB so there would surely be no clipping. Probably better leave it as is and increase volume with other controls to compensate.

 

post #197 of 204

Thanks! I'll give it a try!

post #198 of 204

Now I do need help from gurus of EQ :)

 

On the IRCAM's site's downloads page, there's a system's impulse responce file presented. I have imported it into REW to make an filter to correct out the responce. I've successfully exported filter responce and applied it into fb2k using convolver plugin (made an error, should have applied it after stereo convolver, not before, but that only has implications with clipping, not tonal balance).

 

However, REW only allows filter autogeneration for frequencies below 10 kHz. As a result, I've got a +35 dB @ 20kHz  from 0dB at 10kHz. Tried to listen and obviously, got ultra shrill sound. Have applied three consequent xnor's graphic EQs with 20 kHz set to -12 dB each, it had balanced the sound and I've heard some pretty insane bass. But I think it's not the best way to do so.

 

So, what other free software can be used to generate compensating filters from a sample IR? DRC-FIR seems to do so, but is a bit complicated for the first time, so perhaps there's something easier to use. If not, well, I'd have to learn DRC.

post #199 of 204

Above 10kHz is it simple to EQ by ear. There isn't a lot of music up there anyway. Try listening to a lot of really good recordings with cymbals and triangles and see what you can do with a spit in the wind tweak. It will probably be fine. I use Fiedler's Gaeite Parisienne for this sort of tweak.

post #200 of 204

I probably have already balanced it well enough just by eye - it was a simple slope to compensate, but it irks me to use 4 plugins instead of one. Seems to tax CPU a bit, my computer is old.

post #201 of 204

I'll bite. After 14 pages, has anyone said that, despite a perfect flat EQ response on 2 utterly different speakers, there is still a chance that

 

A) The SPL possible by one will not be possible by the other

B) This is because of mechanical limits like X-max and relative efficiency

 

My experience with EQ says that it is relatively hard to make a bad speaker sound great, and easy to make a good speaker sound terrible. Even when you can, limits to power handling and other factors prevent perfection anyway. Theoretically, I would expect 2 speakers of exact frequency response sound the same.

post #202 of 204

Yes, some speakers can go louder than others. But balancing the response will improve *any* speaker's performance. It's about getting the most out of the speakers you've got.

 

Also, correcting spikes in the bass can let you turn the volume up a bit, so they won't be so quiet.


Edited by bigshot - 12/13/12 at 7:39pm
post #203 of 204
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrMateoHead View Post

I'll bite. After 14 pages, has anyone said that, despite a perfect flat EQ response on 2 utterly different speakers, there is still a chance that

 

A) The SPL possible by one will not be possible by the other

B) This is because of mechanical limits like X-max and relative efficiency

 

My experience with EQ says that it is relatively hard to make a bad speaker sound great, and easy to make a good speaker sound terrible. Even when you can, limits to power handling and other factors prevent perfection anyway. Theoretically, I would expect 2 speakers of exact frequency response sound the same.

We sort of did, even with headphones: http://www.head-fi.org/t/612665/how-far-can-eq-really-go-towards-truly-equalizing-headphones/90#post_8460432

post #204 of 204
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrMateoHead View Post

Theoretically, I would expect 2 speakers of exact frequency response sound the same.

They should sound similar, not necessarily the same. The speakers will still have different nonlinearities even aside from the different limitations nearing the excursion limit. e.g. what if THD in midrange for one speaker is still higher than the other?

Also, if you balance the FR at one point out in space, any (slightly) off-axis response may be a bit or a lot different for the two—even in free space or an anechoic chamber—much less a more typical room.
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