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High-end headphones for mixing and mastering? - Page 2

post #16 of 31

I think you might actually might want to mix on a few different loudspeakers and headphones to get a feel for it.

 

The HD800 is great for looking deep into a recording and finding hisses, crack and other nasty things.

 

A regular set of loudspeakers like B&W 801/802 powered by something like a NAD amp is great if you can afford it, this is where you want to fine tune your sound and find the correct levels. Can also be a smaller set of nearfield speakers.

 

A cheap set of sony or sennheiser in-ears is great since that's how a lot of people will listen to music.

 

If you find something that sounds great on all three of these you're probably on to something.

post #17 of 31

I've been using AKG K240 DF to mix/master/etc - semi open. Hasn't been a problem. These are very neutral, you can't get much better. You'll need to get the older ones 2nd hand now, but anything K240 with 600 ohms will do it.

 

As above, you need to mix/master using a few different speakers/headphones to ensure that an awkward peak somewhere in your mix doesn't cause an unwanted effect within the equipment of your intended victims audience.

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post #18 of 31

thank  you very much. you mean that is better to use some sources instead of one great headphone.

I really want my mixing equipment be portable.is there any standard monitors that is small in size?

and what is your idea about DT880 pro,250 ohm?

and also about a Ultimate Ear headphones?

I can pay for studio equipment once, if I choose wrong I cant change the product I bought.


Edited by mehrdadiii - 5/4/14 at 8:04am
post #19 of 31

I like the DT880 Pro - good detail there.

 

Mixing music is something YOU need to master - the equipment is 2nd to your own ears. You need to get a good balance on the equipment of your listeners - whatever it might be.

 

Try to go for as neutral a headphone as you can, the DT880 may be a bit bright for this purpose but I've never tried mixing with the 880s. I haven't tried UE headphones for mixing either.

 

Use the headphones for mixing, then try and play the mix back on your hifi, or the hifi of your client. Most people will be listening back on non-studio equipment and this is where you need to check how your mix sounds.

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post #20 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveHiFi View Post
 

I like the DT880 Pro - good detail there.

 

Mixing music is something YOU need to master - the equipment is 2nd to your own ears. You need to get a good balance on the equipment of your listeners - whatever it might be.

 

Try to go for as neutral a headphone as you can, the DT880 may be a bit bright for this purpose but I've never tried mixing with the 880s. I haven't tried UE headphones for mixing either.

 

Use the headphones for mixing, then try and play the mix back on your hifi, or the hifi of your client. Most people will be listening back on non-studio equipment and this is where you need to check how your mix sounds.

what headphones are neutral?

you know I heard that they are all dark or bright. So what is the reference here?

I need my headphone to be flat and also give me a high quality sound.

what do you recommend?

would you please list the most neutral headphones for mixing?

I am really confused in these forums.

post #21 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by mehrdadiii View Post
 

what headphones are neutral?

you know I heard that they are all dark or bright. So what is the reference here?

I need my headphone to be flat and also give me a high quality sound.

what do you recommend?

would you please list the most neutral headphones for mixing?

I am really confused in these forums.

 

I think if you want absolutely ruler flat response you're probably best looking at a pair of custom in-ears.

 

Something like this:

 

http://pro.ultimateears.com/en-us/home/Reference-Monitors

 

http://homerecording.about.com/od/audiomonitorreviews/fr/Review-Ultimate-Ears-In-Ear-Reference-Monitors.htm

 

Headphones in general have problems with standing waves between the driver and your head creating an uneven reponse.

 

Neither the Audeze headphones nor the Sennheiser ones are really "ruler flat". Both the Audeze and Sennheiser have a little bit of recessed midrange if you look at the graphs. And Sennheiser have a peak at 6-8 kHz as well.

 

To my knowledge there is no headphone with an absolutely perfect freq response on the market.

 

In-ears in general can be more precise since the sound pressure area they're trying to control is much smaller.


Edited by TwoEars - 5/11/14 at 1:29pm
post #22 of 31

I would mix on near/mid fields, sometimes checking the mix using headphones.

When it comes to mastering, it is usually on larger (and more detailed) three or four way main monitors, check on near fields, again on crappy computer speakers, then check it again on a variety of headphones, but usually not open cans. When you nailed it on the main speakers, they are almost certain to sound perfect on those colored, high end cans. AKG K240 was "standard" at one point. Same era when Yamaha's NS10M were the industry standard studio monitors.

The only time that I would use headphones more is while tracking, I guess. Or maybe while mucking around on music arrangements. Never mixing and mastering. Definitely not mastering.

Headphones are only used for leisure, music on the go, or in live environments when I need to solo a track.

Side note : When it comes to mixing and mastering, playback source plays a little part in hearing correctly. The room acoustics is everything. That is why a "proper" studio cost hundreds of thousands to upwards of a million dollars to build.

 


Edited by kleefurd - 5/12/14 at 9:49am
post #23 of 31

What's the reference point for neutrality? That's a great question!

 

I wish I had a good answer! I suppose you can look at frequency response charts and see it that way, but you're likely better off just getting a recommendation. When I was doing music tech at college years ago, the AKG K240 DF was recommended to me and I've got used to them over the years. They sound a bit dull and boring when compared to 'end user' headphones ie. designed for a fun sound.

 

I would create a list, but this is the only one I'm happy with recommending as I've not seriously used any others.

 

I've never used them exclusively, except for little jobs like arranging, then gone to speakers to start the mix. I've gone back to the headphones to listen for details, get a 2nd opinion on perceived issues, that sort of thing.

 

Perhaps you can read up on mixing tips, there's a magazine called 'Sound on Sound' which has a lot of articles available on the web. eg -

 

http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/jun98/articles/20tips.html

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post #24 of 31

For studio work, I have Dangerous Music Source. It works really well with monitors and headphones. I use KRK KNS 8400 with them all the time - really good for monitoring. HD800 on the DM Source is very neutral and hard to beat at that price for not only mixing but also for listening.

post #25 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoEars View Post
 

 

I think if you want absolutely ruler flat response you're probably best looking at a pair of custom in-ears.

 

Something like this:

 

http://pro.ultimateears.com/en-us/home/Reference-Monitors

 

http://homerecording.about.com/od/audiomonitorreviews/fr/Review-Ultimate-Ears-In-Ear-Reference-Monitors.htm

 

Headphones in general have problems with standing waves between the driver and your head creating an uneven reponse.

 

Neither the Audeze headphones nor the Sennheiser ones are really "ruler flat". Both the Audeze and Sennheiser have a little bit of recessed midrange if you look at the graphs. And Sennheiser have a peak at 6-8 kHz as well.

 

To my knowledge there is no headphone with an absolutely perfect freq response on the market.

 

In-ears in general can be more precise since the sound pressure area they're trying to control is much smaller.

thank you,

I don't want a ruler flat, I want a reliable product for mixing and listening.

there are lots of headphones, and I want to choose one for my portable studio (my laptop).

and I don't know something like DT880 pro is suitable for me or not! and, Is it essential to have a external soundcard like Creative OMNI 5.1?

post #26 of 31

I'm looking for the same thing - good mixing/mastering cans for late-night work, mobile work, etc.

 

Just want to plug Redline Monitor - have you seen this? I have the ATH-M50 and the Redline Monitor plugin makes the soundstage MUCH more natural-sounding, much easier to judge stereo placement, reverb space, etc. Much more similar to using speakers/monitors.

 

http://www.112db.com/redline/monitor/

 

I'm not in any way affiliated with them, just found it and am really enjoying it. It's the only plugin of this type I've found that doesn't change the frequency balance or make other undesirable changes (like TB Isone does).

 

Also, what laptop are you using? The built-in DACs / amplifiers generally aren't great, so getting a separate USB DAC might be a good idea. 

 

So Redline Monitor + a good DAC + solid headphones could be a great combo. I'm actually pretty happy with my ATH-M50's right now - I am still looking for something a little flatter/more accurate but they're pretty dang good for the price, and Redline Monitor makes them loads better to mix with.

post #27 of 31

There is a very successful engineer in Taiwan I know of who is doing serious jobs using his Sony MDR7506, even though he can be in a high end studio, he ends up doing a lot of his work on his headphones, connected to the output of his ADDAC. It is a matter of getting used to the sound reproduction of your cans (or speakers) and letting your ears tell you what is flat. Thankfully we can hear a reference track and then make the judgement for tweaking based on that. Interesting how our ears work so differently. 

post #28 of 31
Akg k812?
post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by DisCHORDDubstep View Post

Akg k812?

K240 was the standard back then in many studios. Not sure if the K812 can capture that glory all over again... personally I have not heard the K812s yet... I think at some point I might go have a listen to them.

post #30 of 31
http://www.head-fi.org/products/akg-k812/reviews/10312 I own k240's, and love them btw.
Edited by DisCHORDDubstep - 5/19/14 at 5:24pm
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