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Will I blow my amp up ?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Hi guys
I have a la figaro 339 tube amp and to turn it on there are two power switches behind the unit.
I am thinking of just pluging it into a powerboard with a switch and using that to turn it on and off leaving the amp on.
I am thinking that there may be a power spike on startup by doing this and may damage my amp/ cans ?
Anyone with a bit more understanding than myself please put my mind at ease
Cheers
post #2 of 13
I know nothing about this amp, let me qualify that.

That said: what do the switches on the back actually do, function wise, in the circuit? Do they just cut AC from the amplifier to the mains, or do they switch relays/start-up logic that brings the amplifier in/out of standby?

If the former, the power bar won't do anything different than what it's already doing (you're just moving where the switch is located). If the later, it probably won't turn on - it'll just switch in and out of stand-by (very few components with a stand-by mode will go fully on with a power cycle). Any reason for not wanting to use the onboard switches? (Guessing they're inconveniently located).
post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
There is no standby , the switches turn the power straight on and yeah they aren't ideally located
Cheers for the advice
post #4 of 13

2100.jpg

 

This is the amplifier?

 

If yes, then there's no problem with using an external switch on the power line. You can see in the picture that the switches do nothing more than cut off the power getting inside the unit.

 

Though it's probably not a good idea to use a power strip for this. Those things have breakers, not switches. They are not meant to be turned on and off on a daily basis. It will eventually die. 

 

I had a similar problem. I shut off every electronics in my room when I go to bed, because I can't stand the noise from the power supplies. (and switching supplies are most noisy when they have no load...) So I visited my local hardware store and then built this :

 

15 Amps power switch with GFCI plug and breaker. Used to turn off all the electronics in my room. DIY

 

It's basically a GFCI protected switchable power box. There's a breaker poking out on the right. The switch is a wall switch, the flat type that you just push. Perfect for toggling with your foot. Since this type of switch is designed for thousands of on/off cycles, it's better suited for your application. This thing plugs directly to the wall with a 15 amps power cable, and I plug my power strips into the GFCI. Note that power cables and sockets rated for 15 amps are a rare find. Most are 10 amps.

 

It costs me around 10$ and took just a few minutes to build. Compare that to other GFCI protected power strips. And those don't have real switches. wink.gif

 

But I realize not everybody are comfortable working with main's power. For them I could only recommend something like Belkin's Conserve Switch. I can only hope that this thing is designed for multiple On/Off cycles. And it's cheap too.

post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by KimLaroux View Post


But I realize not everybody are comfortable working with main's power. For them I could only recommend something like
Belkin's Conserve Switch. I can only hope that this thing is designed for multiple On/Off cycles. And it's cheap too.

I assumed this kind of strip was meant, and yes they are designed for what they're doing. Many power taps have both an on/off toggle and a breaker; or they lack the breaker. At least IME.

What you built is above and beyond, and really the right way to do things though. smily_headphones1.gif
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by KimLaroux View Post

350x232px-LL-7a387a43_2100.jpeg

This is the amplifier?

If yes, then there's no problem with using an external switch on the power line. You can see in the picture that the switches do nothing more than cut off the power getting inside the unit.

Though it's probably not a good idea to use a power strip for this. Those things have breakers, not switches. They are not meant to be turned on and off on a daily basis. It will eventually die. 

I had a similar problem. I shut off every electronics in my room when I go to bed, because I can't stand the noise from the power supplies. (and switching supplies are most noisy when they have no load...) So I visited my local hardware store and then built this :

350x263px-LL-42b3dbc4_22052012173.jpeg

It's basically a GFCI protected switchable power box. There's a breaker poking out on the right. The switch is a wall switch, the flat type that you just push. Perfect for toggling with your foot. Since this type of switch is designed for thousands of on/off cycles, it's better suited for your application. This thing plugs directly to the wall with a 15 amps power cable, and I plug my power strips into the GFCI. Note that power cables and sockets rated for 15 amps are a rare find. Most are 10 amps.

It costs me around 10$ and took just a few minutes to build. Compare that to other GFCI protected power strips. And those don't have real switches. wink.gif

But I realize not everybody are comfortable working with main's power. For them I could only recommend something like Belkin's Conserve Switch. I can only hope that this thing is designed for multiple On/Off cycles. And it's cheap too.

Any GFI receptacle you buy at the hardware store should be rated for either 15 or 20 Amps and should be CSA approved ( or UL approved if you live in the States).
Get a 14 AWG power cable, it will be rated for 15 Amps.
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris J View Post

Get a 14 AWG power cable, it will be rated for 15 Amps.

No. We use 2500 MCM in this house. wink_face.gif

Jokes aside, +1.
Edited by obobskivich - 5/23/12 at 4:46am
post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 

cheers

 yes indeed that is my amp and i am going to be using a board with both switches and a breaker
thanks again you have been a great help
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by obobskivich View Post


No. We use 2500 MCM in this house. wink_face.gif
Jokes aside, +1.

 

Strange, I thought you used Di Lithium crystals?confused.gif

 

Signed,

Very Confused.

post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris J View Post


Any GFI receptacle you buy at the hardware store should be rated for either 15 or 20 Amps and should be CSA approved ( or UL approved if you live in the States).
Get a 14 AWG power cable, it will be rated for 15 Amps.

The gauge is one thing, the connector another. Most power cords have connectors rated for 10 amps. Last time I was searching for a 15 amps power cable, I found one made of 14 AWG and 10 amps plugs, and another with 16 AWG and 15 amps plugs... doesn't make sens. I had to actually order one from the web, along with a 15 amps socket.

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by KimLaroux View Post

The gauge is one thing, the connector another. Most power cords have connectors rated for 10 amps. Last time I was searching for a 15 amps power cable, I found one made of 14 AWG and 10 amps plugs, and another with 16 AWG and 15 amps plugs... doesn't make sens. I had to actually order one from the web, along with a 15 amps socket.

I guess you mean the IEC 320 end?
post #12 of 13

Yes, the IEC 60320 C13 and C14 connectors.

 

The confusing part is those connectors have two ratings on them. Most have a 15 amp CSA rating and 10 amp VDE rating. So a power cord with 14 AWG wire and a 10 amp C13 connector... is it 15A or 10A?!? confused_face(1).gif

 

But anyways, electronics are so efficient nowadays that 10 amps is sufficient. As long as things stay cool to the touch, you're not overloading anything.

post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by KimLaroux View Post

Yes, the IEC 60320 C13 and C14 connectors.

The confusing part is those connectors have two ratings on them. Most have a 15 amp CSA rating and 10 amp VDE rating. So a power cord with 14 AWG wire and a 10 amp C13 connector... is it 15A or 10A?!? confused_face(1).gif

But anyways, electronics are so efficient nowadays that 10 amps is sufficient. As long as things stay cool to the touch, you're not overloading anything.


The CSA rating is 15 Amps, 250 Volts so in Canada the official rating is 15 Amps.
The UL rating is also 15 amps, UL is the American electrical standard.

VDE is a European standard.

So 14 AWG cable with an IEC 320 C13 and C14 is good for 15 Amps in North America.
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