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Best headphone & amp for ambient music - Page 11

post #151 of 167
Thread Starter 
Quote:
If you like bright treble then yeah, hd800 only has 2.5 negative points.  If you like neutral treble then it has 7.5 negative points.  Inner fidelity has better graphs of most every headphone-- including HE-400.

yeah, you are right, I didn't noticed fourth line. HD 800 has got 7.5 negative points (based on extrabigmehdi criterion), but still I can't understand how did they evaluate headphones that a great headphone like Audeze lcd-2's (that I think most of head-fi users accept their great bass response at least) has got 14.5 negative points ?


Edited by cartograph - 6/3/12 at 8:50am
post #152 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by cartograph View Post

yeah, you are right, I didn't noticed fourth line. HD 800 has got 7.5 negative points (based on extrabigmehdi criterion), but still I can't understand how did they evaluate headphones that a great headphone like Audeze lcd-2's (that I think most of head-fi users accept their great bass response at least) has got 14.5 negative points ?

They haven't made the perfect headphones yet my friend!

post #153 of 167

LOL, do people actually read golden-ears sliders as "points", it's just a slider and telling roughly what characteristics they have, since when would "boomy" bass be positive for example, ie the left side isn't actually the "bad" side, it's just up to your personal taste what you're looking for and these sliders just tell towards which side they are in the different characteristics. It's great for people knowing what they prefer so they can compare towards that.

 

I find their measurements very nice, especially frequency response graphs.


Edited by RPGWiZaRD - 6/3/12 at 9:13am
post #154 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by RPGWiZaRD View Post

 It's great for people knowing what they prefer so they can compare towards that.

thanks, this is well said.

Counting points is pushing things too far,  you have to know also your tastes. And the rating was subjective anyway, I just found it very convenient. If all you  care is neutrality, just get the relatively cheap brainwav m5.
 

 

EDIT: Also it's perhaps better to have a headphone with moderate flaws everywhere, than a headphone that excels everywhere, and have a big flaw. I  know lot of people, that found the hd800 brightness unacceptable.


Edited by extrabigmehdi - 6/3/12 at 3:21pm
post #155 of 167
Thread Starter 

@ All of kind users who helped me with their replies

 

Thank you.

At last I made my choice and decided to go with HE-400. It seems to be the best choice. And about amp I would go with Fiio E17 or Objective2.

 

Peace.

post #156 of 167

Let us know if you reached satisfaction.

post #157 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by cartograph View Post

@ All of kind users who helped me with their replies

 

Thank you.

At last I made my choice and decided to go with HE-400. It seems to be the best choice. And about amp I would go with Fiio E17 or Objective2.

 

Peace.

As long as you go for the headphone amp/dac combo you can't go wrong!

post #158 of 167

Hi,

 

Cartograph, you made the right decision. HE-400 seems to be great. I'll hope you enjoy them.

-------------------------

I know this is not a proper place and I also know that it is a little bit late to ask a question about what I'd asked 6 days ago, but I didn't want to start a new thread and pollute the forum for only a simple question.So:

 

I'd asked:

Quote:

Hi,

 

I want to use this thread and ask a question here. Yesterday I did an Audiometry test and the results shows that I have 30% loss of hearing in 2000-8000 range. Does it mean that I should use a treblish headphone to compensate this loss?

 

Thanks

and catscratch responded:

 

Quote:
No. If you use a treble-happy headphone you're only going to damage your hearing more. Use a linear headphone and keep the volume in check. You will compensate for high-frequency hearing loss psychoacoustically, in fact you've probably already done so.

Listening to something with spikes in the highs just means that your ears will be receiving a higher peak volume than average perceived volume, and you'll do even more hearing damage in the future.

and I had asked again:

Quote:

 

You're the best!

and are some headphones like DT880 & K701 linear or they are treble-happy?

But this time, no one answered me. I really want to buy DT880, but I'm afraid that its treble make my hearing loss worse than this. I listened to what cartograph listens. Ambient, Noise, Black Metal and a little bit of Classical music, but at an average volume. Now can someone tell me if I can buy DT880 or not & also does DT880 consider linear or treble-happy?

 

Thanks

post #159 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by goldoon View Post

and I had asked again:

But this time, no one answered me. I really want to buy DT880, but I'm afraid that its treble make my hearing loss worse than this. I listened to what cartograph listens. Ambient, Noise, Black Metal and a little bit of Classical music, but at an average volume. Now can someone tell me if I can buy DT880 or not & also does DT880 consider linear or treble-happy?

 

Thanks

Just listen to the headphone normally, if you experience any pain with the headphone at a normal volume level, these headphones are not for you (or you should eq).
 

post #160 of 167
I already linked you the innerfidelity measurement page. The frequency response measurements will give you an idea as to how they compare. I don't have much experience with the DT880 or K701, but on paper at least they have more treble emphasis than the HD600 - especially the DT880 - and the HD600 is pretty close to neutral. Though to complicate the picture further, there are two versions of the HD600, and the newer version is said to be brighter. Mine's the older version and it's pretty well balanced.

If you're worried about the highs - as I've said before - keep the listening level down. If you hear excessive tinnitus after a listening session, it's your ears telling you to back off the volume.

In your position I'd get the HD600 but that's because I'm familiar with it.
post #161 of 167

Thank you extrabigmehdi & catscratch.

 

 

Quote:
I already linked you the innerfidelity measurement page. The frequency response measurements will give you an idea as to how they compare. I don't have much experience with the DT880 or K701, but on paper at least they have more treble emphasis than the HD600 - especially the DT880 - and the HD600 is pretty close to neutral. Though to complicate the picture further, there are two versions of the HD600, and the newer version is said to be brighter. Mine's the older version and it's pretty well balanced.

If you're worried about the highs - as I've said before - keep the listening level down. If you hear excessive tinnitus after a listening session, it's your ears telling you to back off the volume.
 
goldoon:I haven't experienced excessive tinnitus at all, until now. Only some kind of tiny pain in my right ear. The audiometrist told me my loss of hearing probably has happened because of a super loud sound (a blasting sound). I don't remember exposing to that kind of loud sound that he mentioned and maybe it was with me when I had born. So, I don't think that my loss of hearing has roots in music listening. But, I'll do what you said. It's the best solution.
 

In your position I'd get the HD600 but that's because I'm familiar with it.
 
goldoon:Thanks for your recommendation, but I want to get DT880 (600 ohms version) for mixing/mastering my music. I don't think HD600 to be at the same level of accuracy. Though, I'm not sure at all.
post #162 of 167
Then get the DT880 if you're set on it, and if you find the top end overbearing, use some EQ to level it out.

You can get a decibel meter (or even a decibel meter app on a smartphone) and get a rough estimate for your listening level. Here is a guideline for safe listening volumes as they relate to decibel levels vs time. I'm not sure if it's accurate, but it seems to be within the ballpark. Keep in mind, however, that if you already have some hearing damage then your safe threshold is likely to be lower. But it pays to be aware of your actual listening levels at any rate.

Also, consider nearfield monitors for mixing and mastering as they're likely to be more linear. Headphones will get you more resolution per dollar though.
post #163 of 167
Quote:

Then get the DT880 if you're set on it, and if you find the top end overbearing, use some EQ to level it out.

You can get a decibel meter (or even a decibel meter app on a smartphone) and get a rough estimate for your listening level. Here is a guideline for safe listening volumes as they relate to decibel levels vs time. I'm not sure if it's accurate, but it seems to be within the ballpark. Keep in mind, however, that if you already have some hearing damage then your safe threshold is likely to be lower. But it pays to be aware of your actual listening levels at any rate.

Also, consider nearfield monitors for mixing and mastering as they're likely to be more linear. Headphones will get you more resolution per dollar though.

Thanks. Mike at Headfonia said that maybe a tube amp help DT880 to perform mids better and also made them less treble-happy. Anyone has any experience with DT880 and tube amps?

post #164 of 167

there is no one who uses DT880 with tube amps really?

post #165 of 167
Quote:
there is no one who uses DT880 with tube amps really?

x2

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