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[Review] Meelectronics A161p, the most satisfying IEM I've ever heard - Page 3

post #31 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyman392 View Post

...  For some odd reason, they have ears of steal.  I don't have such ears ...

I think we're in agreement on everything. Although they don't have ears of steal, they might believe they do but give them a few years at max and they'll sufferer noise-induced hearing loss just like anyone else :/

post #32 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by WalkGood View Post

I think we're in agreement on everything. Although they don't have ears of steal, they might believe they do but give them a few years at max and they'll sufferer noise-induced hearing loss just like anyone else :/

 

So, how does one measure db levels for IEM's or headphones?

 

 

bob

post #33 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by WalkGood View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyman392 View Post

...  For some odd reason, they have ears of steal.  I don't have such ears ...

I think we're in agreement on everything. Although they don't have ears of steal, they might believe they do but give them a few years at max and they'll sufferer noise-induced hearing loss just like anyone else :/


So true, do true my friend.


Sent from an iPod touch with TapaTalk... Autocorrect may alter the meaning of this message tongue.gif
post #34 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by steelgtr View Post


So, how does one measure db levels for IEM's or headphones?

 

 

bob


If you have some tools, I'll show you when I'm on PC. Kinda hard to put formulas on iPod.


Sent from an iPod touch with TapaTalk... Autocorrect may alter the meaning of this message tongue.gif

 

EDIT:

 

OK, ready for your physics lesson?  What you'll need to measure the volume of your headphones without an SPL meter is the following:

  • A volt-meter and aux cable (or a way to estimate voltage)
  • Sensitivity (for the given frequency range you want to measure) of the headphones
  • Impedance (for the given frequency range you want to measure) of the headphones

 

Now, for some formulas that will be used.  They are all electrical

  • v = ir
  • r = (1/r1) + (1/r1) + ... + (1/rn) iff parallel such that for headphones, r1 = r2 = rn = rm.  Since there  are only two earpieces, there is only an r1 and r2 so r = 2/rm.  rm = impedance of the headphones though, so we get: r = 2 / imp
  • i = vr
  • p = iv
  • spl = ps where s = sensitivity
  • db = 20 log(spl) such that the log has a base of 10.

 

First, find the voltage of the device you are using.  Get your aux cable and plug it in.  Place the volt meter the the first terminal and third terminal.  Measure the voltage, you have found your v.  If you have no volt meter, I found through some trial and error that the voltage of the iPod touch is approximately 1.11 * (volume)^2 such that the volume = the percentage of total volume in decimal form (volume% / 100).

 

Find your r.

 

r = 2 / impedance

 

Find your i

 

i = vr

 

Find your p

 

p = iv = v^2 r

 

Find your spl level.

 

spl = sensitivity * p

 

Convert to dB

 

dB = 20 log(spl)  You can also use this converter: http://www.sengpielaudio.com/calculator-soundlevel.htm

 

And you're done...

 

Back on topic now, the A161p :p


Edited by tinyman392 - 5/25/12 at 7:52am
post #35 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyman392 View Post


If you have some tools, I'll show you when I'm on PC. Kinda hard to put formulas on iPod.


Sent from an iPod touch with TapaTalk... Autocorrect may alter the meaning of this message tongue.gif

 

EDIT:

 

OK, ready for your physics lesson?  What you'll need to measure the volume of your headphones without an SPL meter is the following:

  • A volt-meter and aux cable (or a way to estimate voltage)
  • Sensitivity (for the given frequency range you want to measure) of the headphones
  • Impedance (for the given frequency range you want to measure) of the headphones

 

Now, for some formulas that will be used.  They are all electrical

  • v = ir
  • r = (1/r1) + (1/r1) + ... + (1/rn) iff parallel such that for headphones, r1 = r2 = rn = rm.  Since there  are only two earpieces, there is only an r1 and r2 so r = 2/rm.  rm = impedance of the headphones though, so we get: r = 2 / imp
  • i = vr
  • p = iv
  • spl = ps where s = sensitivity
  • db = 20 log(spl) such that the log has a base of 10.

 

First, find the voltage of the device you are using.  Get your aux cable and plug it in.  Place the volt meter the the first terminal and third terminal.  Measure the voltage, you have found your v.  If you have no volt meter, I found through some trial and error that the voltage of the iPod touch is approximately 1.11 * (volume)^2 such that the volume = the percentage of total volume in decimal form (volume% / 100).

 

Find your r.

 

r = 2 / impedance

 

Find your i

 

i = vr

 

Find your p

 

p = iv = v^2 r

 

Find your spl level.

 

spl = sensitivity * p

 

Convert to dB

 

dB = 20 log(spl)  You can also use this converter: http://www.sengpielaudio.com/calculator-soundlevel.htm

 

And you're done...

 

Back on topic now, the A161p :p


Wow, Thanks!

 

I guess I should have said I have 2 RS SPL Meters!  Didn't know if they work for this?

 

bob

post #36 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by steelgtr View Post


Wow, Thanks!

 

I guess I should have said I have 2 RS SPL Meters!  Didn't know if they work for this?

 

bob

 

They could...  But you'd need to measure from the right distance in a sealed environment.  You'd also have to make sure the distance didn't change either, or you can get really bad results :p


Edited by tinyman392 - 5/25/12 at 8:26am
post #37 of 49
post #38 of 49
Thread Starter 

I really don't like the BBC article which seems to suggest that it's only MP3's that cause the damage, at least from my brief skimming. The first article is great though.

post #39 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by keanex View Post

I really don't like the BBC article which seems to suggest that it's only MP3's that cause the damage, at least from my brief skimming. The first article is great though.

The writer uses the term “mp3 player” a lot rather than saying digital audio player and in one instant they say “mp3 users” but they probably mean digital audio file users. It’s a brief article with not much depth just trying to get the message across but the real issue IMHO is the uninformed user who thinks they have ears of steal as tinyman392 stated above. But yes you are correct the HeadWize article is so much better ♪ ♫ ♪ ♫ ♪

post #40 of 49
Thread Starter 

I recently upgraded my Beatles rips to pbthals wonderful vinyl rips. Boy does Abbey Road and The Beatles (White Album) sound absolutely stunning on these. I can hear every nuance crystal clear. 

post #41 of 49

Hi all, I'm interested in these iem's! How are they with Trance/Electronic music?! Also is there any difference when paired wtih an amp?L3000.gif

post #42 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by volly View Post

Hi all, I'm interested in these iem's! How are they with Trance/Electronic music?! Also is there any difference when paired wtih an amp?L3000.gif

 

I feel there are better IEMs suited for trance and electronic music.  Haven't tested an amp with it. 

post #43 of 49

Ok cool, thanks for the feedback Tinyman!

post #44 of 49
Thread Starter 

They're okay with trance and electronic, but I much prefer other IEMs for it. 

post #45 of 49
These are on lightning deal on amazon right now for $69.99!
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