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Gold and silver 3.5mm jack sound quality - Page 2

post #16 of 35

Same way nickel has a sparkly (shiny) sound.

post #17 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by muscular View Post

The outer coating shouldn't have any difference, if any it's like placebo due to the colors.

 

lmao, so this is what you learn from the science forum huh?

 

I think you're confusing Placebo with Gazebo - that's when you gaze at it long enough it sound different - it's not been scientifically approved yet, but it's just a matter of time someone will make up some dumbass theory, and it'll be official... tongue_smile.gif

post #18 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lenni View Post

 

lmao, so this is what you learn from the science forum huh?

 

I think you're confusing Placebo with Gazebo - that's when you gaze at it long enough it sound different - it's not been scientifically approved yet, but it's just a matter of time someone will make up some dumbass theory, and it'll be official... tongue_smile.gif

I wonder what kind of sound will silver have when cooled to superconducting levels...erm... Super Cool? 

post #19 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by liamstrain View Post

 

 

 

 
 
No, not so much. Not the way you think anyway. Most of the wisdom about these is a persistent mythology - the sound science subform deals with the specifics in more detail though. I won't dwell on it though - believe what you will. :)


For audio, it's all about signal loss, timing, and interference, such as electrical noise and jitter.  If you are deep in to sounds you should know this. Those low cost generic cable won't cut it. Even when it's working without defects, this is due to the limitation of the cheap cable.  No, it's not about believing what I will.  This is the way things work as it's a mother nature.  You must be new to the audio. :)


Edited by goodolcheez - 5/22/12 at 9:05am
post #20 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by proton007 View Post

I wonder what kind of sound will silver have when cooled to superconducting levels...erm... Super Cool? 


It's not about silver has cool flavor. It's not an ingredient that gives you kool-aid taste. It doesn't work that way.  It gives you detail (due to almost no signal loss and close timing) which gives you cooler, more accurate sound.  Loss of accuracy results in warm sound, this is due to the loss of detail. ;)


Edited by goodolcheez - 5/22/12 at 9:07am
post #21 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by goodolcheez View Post


You must be new too to the forum too.  It's not about silver has cool flavor on it. It's not an ingredient that gives you kool-aid taste. It doesn't work that way.  It gives you detail (due to almost no signal loss and close timing) which gives you cooler, more accurate sound.  Loss of accuracy results in warm sound, this is due to the loss of detail. ;)

 

Seriously - visit the sound science forum, read a bit about what is possible both in theory and in practice. The differences you mention all vanish in blind testing and which metal you use, aside from the amount of resistance (which affects volume/attenuation, but not detail), is not a factor in the least. 

 

If you want to get into t-line theory and possible ground loops, and EMF noise, we can talk. (jitter, incidentally, is only a factor in digital signals - and audible only in massively faulty quantities). The rest of it, is not based in measurable, audible reality. Psycho-acoustic phenomena, on the other hand - I'll give you. 

post #22 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by proton007 View Post

Same way nickel has a sparkly (shiny) sound.


Brass and nickel are poor conductors that introduce significant loss at the points of contact.  Like I said earlier, it doesn't have the ingredient that gives you flavor.

post #23 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by liamstrain View Post

 

The differences you mention all vanish in blind testing and which metal you use, aside from the amount of resistance (which affects volume/attenuation, but not detail), is not a factor in the least. 

 

If you want to get into t-line theory and possible ground loops, and EMF noise, we can talk. (jitter, incidentally, is only a factor in digital signals - and audible only in massively faulty quantities). The rest of it, is not based in measurable, audible reality. Psycho-acoustic phenomena, on the other hand - I'll give you. 

 

Describe blind testing. :)  You mean take someone or a group of people other than yourself to listen for the difference?  That would have to be the worst method of testing. If you want to know why, feel free to ask. - I'll give you. :)

 

And it's not a theory. Mother nature is something that we deal with. it's not about theory or faith. :)

post #24 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by goodolcheez View Post


Brass and nickel are poor conductors that introduce significant loss at the points of contact.  Like I said earlier, it doesn't have the ingredient that gives you flavor.

 

Loss in nominal resistance is overcome by larger surface area... also - what ingredient, precisely, does an ELEMENT have (silver/gold/copper) that a different element or alloy containing them, would not - especially as regards the behavior of electricity. Something eminently testable and predictable. 

 

Do not misunderstand the word theory. Theory means a series of principles, backed by observation which describe and predict the things we see and expect to see. Not a guess, or faith. But really - we should not go on about it here.

 

There are many discussions dealing with your questions in the Sound Science subforum. 


Edited by liamstrain - 5/22/12 at 9:22am
post #25 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by liamstrain View Post

 

Loss in nominal resistance is overcome by larger surface area... also - what ingredient, precisely, does an ELEMENT have (silver/gold/copper) that a different element or alloy containing them, would not - especially as regards the behavior of electricity. Something eminently testable and predictable. 

 

Do not misunderstand the word theory. Theory means a series of principles, backed by observation which describe and predict the things we see and expect to see. Not a guess, or faith. But really - we should not go on about it here.

 

There are many discussions dealing with your questions in the Sound Science subforum. 

 

You mean the larger contact area overcoming the loss in resistance?  That is true, but not if that metal is poor conductor altogether.  Metals (conductors in the cable) do make difference due to the ability of reducing strand interaction, a major source of cable distortion. Coated silver is good, but solid silver conductor is the best approach. Also the construction of the cable in the outer layers do help reduce distortion as it reduces on energy absorption.  The jitter and electrical noise exist everywhere in the system.  If your ears are not sensitive to the noise, distortion (in the highs), and detail you don't have to take my advice. :)


Edited by goodolcheez - 5/22/12 at 10:54am
post #26 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by liamstrain View Post

 

Oh wee wee! bling bling!  (jitter, incidentally, is only a factor in digital signals - and audible only in massively faulty quantities). The rest of it, is not based in measurable, audible reality. Psycho-acoustic phenomena, on the other hand - I'll give you. 

See underlined above for reference.  Umm, no. jitter is ANALOG. It exists everywhere as nature. You can't get away with it. No where to hide. The only thing we could do is to help minimize it.

post #27 of 35

That's right.  Jitter is analog and everywhere in nature.  Don't you know that when the Lynx gives birth in the wild the jitter in the vixen's contractions prior to birth give a clue about the viability of the kitten?  Jitter is like gravity.  It is is inherent to time-space.

post #28 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mauricio View Post

That's right.  Jitter is analog and everywhere in nature.  Don't you know that when the Lynx gives birth in the wild the jitter in the vixen's contractions prior to birth give a clue about the viability of the kitten?  Jitter is like gravity.  It is is inherent to time-space.

What about human babies? Jitter plays a role there too?

post #29 of 35

Of course.  The newest prenatal examinations make use of an ultrasound jitter probe that checks the fetus' hearbeat.  Any jitter could point to cardiac abnormalities in the unborn baby.

post #30 of 35

There is no sound quality difference between gold en silver. The only difference is that gold is a durable product. When you switch your jack a lot, than is gold a good choice.

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