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FLAC vs Apple LossLess - Page 8  

post #106 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by Achmedisdead View Post

Start over, ripping into either FLAC or ALAC. Your m4a stuff is not worth converting to APE, that just makes a bigger file with the same quality. L3000.gif


Well, ALAC is .m4a so, it depends on the quality of his m4a rip to begin with.

If you ripped in iTunes using apple lossless, then it is lossless and sonically the same as other formats. There is an argument about which lossless format is best, but I don't think it is worth re-ripping all of your stuff if what you have is already lossless. If you didn't rip in lossless, than you need to re-rip your CD's in a lossless format. I use j.River and rip using ALAC so it can be used on my iPod. I don't like having multiple files of each song, but to each their own. Easiest way to tell if you ripped into apple lossless is the bitrate, if it's 500 or above than you used ALAC, and the bitrate will be different for each track.

post #107 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by HayU View Post

My question, would it be better to re rip from cd directly into ape or some other format or just continue re formatting from m4a? Seems m4a being compressed wont have same amount of data as original cd?

I can't speak for ape, but I did a test transcoding an AAC 256 recording ten times to see how much was lost in transcoding. The tenth generation copy sounded fine. The losses in lossy are greatly exaggerated.
post #108 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post


I can't speak for ape, but I did a test transcoding an AAC 256 recording ten times to see how much was lost in transcoding. The tenth generation copy sounded fine. The losses in lossy are greatly exaggerated.

blink.gif

post #109 of 149
Try it yourself. Take an AAC file in iTunes and convert it to AIFF then back to AAC again. Do it a few times and listen to what you end up with. You'll be surprised.
post #110 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

Try it yourself. Take an AAC file in iTunes and convert it to AIFF then back to AAC again. Do it a few times and listen to what you end up with. You'll be surprised.


lmao I've done this before on accident in the past and the results were quite horrible ;). This is when I didn't know any better and still I knew something was wrong :P.

post #111 of 149
What codec? What bitrate?

Try it with AAC 256 and what I'm saying won't sound so crazy to you. I am completely serious.
post #112 of 149

I want ALAC but don't want to re-rip my CDs. JRiver Media Player 18 can convert my FLACs to ALAC. However, is this safe, or is SQ compromised in the process? I guess not, but I have this slight worry in the back of my mind. Thanks!

post #113 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aero Dynamik View Post

I want ALAC but don't want to re-rip my CDs. JRiver Media Player 18 can convert my FLACs to ALAC. However, is this safe, or is SQ compromised in the process? I guess not, but I have this slight worry in the back of my mind. Thanks!

 

I use dbPoweramp to convert FLAC to ALAC and have never noticed any quality degradation. I have heard of people with more acute ears than me converting the same track from one format to the other 10+ times and still not noticing a change in SQ.

post #114 of 149

using  the batch converter of  dbPoweramp you can covert all your files at one time.

post #115 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluzeboy View Post

using  the batch converter of  dbPoweramp you can covert all your files at one time.

 

OR use FFMPEG with Batch

 

ffmpeg.exe -i "INPUTFILE" -acodec "OUTPUTCODEC" "CONVERTEDFILE"

 

 

"INPUTFile" ==> Which file do you wanna convert

"OUTPUTCODEC" ==> Which codec do you wanna use? (alac, flac, mp3, wav, etc.)

"ConvertedFILE" ==> where to save the file after its converted?

 

If you convert to MP3 or some lossy format, you can set a bitrate by using -ab 320000 (320kbits/s).

 

I wrote a little C# Script some time ago, which scans all my directories and converts using ffmpeg, if somebody wants it:

 

(Flac to Alac):

http://pastebin.com/LyHDuGzr

post #116 of 149

dBpoweramp, what a great set of tools! I had no idea something like that existed. It really makes me feel secure ripping and converting. The "AccurateRip" feature just blew me away! biggrin.gif Thank you very much head-fi:ers!

post #117 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by Radio_head View Post

Steve Nugent:

EAC is the best ripper IMO because it calibrates to the CD-ROM drive "offsets" and generates a checksum on every track doing multiple reads.

There is a growing body of evidence that ripping with iTunes, particularly to Apple Lossless may compromise the sound quality

4. File formats. Any reason why a .wav, AIFF, or FLAC file is better than say Apple Lossless? Again people suggest a strong preference for one over the others, so something must be going on here?

I prefer AIFF and .wav files. If disk is cheap, why bother with 50% compression that you get with a lossless format?

Even though they generate a bit-perfect uncompressed copy, my customers have reported that the lossless CODECs sound different than the same .wav file on playback. My theory is that these CODECs causes significant jitter with real-time playback.

            

            Andreas Koch

 

4. File formats. Any reason why a .wav, AIFF, or FLAC file is better than say Apple Lossless? Again people suggest a strong preference for one over the others, so something must be going on here?

A properly designed DAC makes that all irrelevant as long as we don't lose any bits.

 

Gordon Rankin:

4. File formats. Any reason why a .wav, AIFF, or FLAC file is better than say Apple Lossless? Again people suggest a strong preference for one over the others, so something must be going on here?

Files that are compressed like FLAC and Apple Lossless never sound as good as .wav or AIFF. But it's best to use AIFF as the Meta data is stored in the file and therefore if you lose the hard drive the backup files will be easy to recover. If you have .wav files and loose the drive... good luck you might as well start over.

We have seen the compressed file syndrome on slower computers. The faster they are the harder it is to tell the difference between say an AIFF and Apple Lossless.

 

 

 

Charles Hansen:

4. File formats. Any reason why a .wav, AIFF, or FLAC file is better than say Apple Lossless? Again people suggest a strong preference for one over the others, so something must be going on here?This belongs in the "green pen" area. We know that differences exist. We can make hand-waving explanations as to why, but as far as I know, nobody has the "real" answer. Most of high end audio is like that. For example, why do cables sound different? I mean really sound different? Nobody knows, they just make up plausible sounding stories.

 

Jon Rechbach:

4. File formats. Any reason why a .wav, AIFF, or FLAC file is better than say Apple Lossless? Again people suggest a strong preference for one over the others, so something must be going on here? Lossless is lossless as far as we can tell. The only change I can imagine is that the CPU has to work a bit to convert the lossless and there may be some buffer memory access patterns that generate more RF (than straight PCM). I was told that Apple lossless is not lossless for 24 bit data—it compresses to 16 bits. This would not be a good thing.

 

 

Daniel Weiss:

4. File formats. Any reason why a .wav, AIFF, or FLAC file is better than say Apple Lossless? Again people suggest a strong preference for one over the others, so something must be going on here? All formats mentioned are capable of playing back the exact original music, bit for bit identical. So no difference. Again, if the DAC used reacts to the computer activity (via jitter or EMI) then there is  potentially a difference between decoders. That is not a fault of the format, but rather of the DAC.

 

 

 

Found this very amusing. . . 

 

I use fre:ac to make FLAC files personally. Too bad I missing out on all that extra sound quality from wave or AIFF files! rolleyes.gif

post #118 of 149

lmao ;)... Well I do use WAV specifically on my Studio V since I can hear a difference between FLAC and WAV. :P
 

post #119 of 149

No you can't.

post #120 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

No you can't.


You mean, "no you can't" ;).

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