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Sennheiser pricing logic - Page 3

post #31 of 49

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TT600R View Post

?ProduktID=253187

 

This is the pricing of the HD650 over the past 2 years in Holland.(in Euro's)

Seems pretty steady to me.
 

 


Different market = different pricing policies & practices.  Our focus has been on the U.S./North American market.

post #32 of 49

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TT600R View Post

?ProduktID=253187

 

This is the pricing of the HD650 over the past 2 years in Holland.(in Euro's)

Seems pretty steady to me.
 

 

Maybe it's just Sennheiser USA then?  If it is than that's doubly sad, since I'd think they have less of a "luxury lifestyle brand image" here than anywhere in Europe. Are they enforcing MSRP there?

 

Officially MSRP has always been $500 here, but MSRP in most things is meaningless, and most dealers were selling them for about $350 give or take.  As of the dates of CES 2012, the price officially shot up to $500 and they started enforcing MSRP.  It may be permanent, or it may be an attempt to make the HD700 seem like less of an irrelevant product than it is during the launch window.  Hard to say.

 

post #33 of 49

I agree with most on here in that Sennheiser is nuts with the new pricing policy. I passed on both the HD650 and HD800 earlier this year. If I decide to buy either headphone in the future, I will be scouting the used market or looking for alternatives.
 


Edited by 2000impreza - 4/27/12 at 12:11pm
post #34 of 49
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KG Jag View Post

 

?ProduktID=253187

 


This is the pricing of the HD650 over the past 2 years in Holland.(in Euro's)

Seems pretty steady to me.

 

 

 

I see an immediate price drop after it's initial release, and then a slow steady incline in price over two years. What exactly is standard about that? Name me one other form of electronics that doesn't slowly decline in price over time.

 


Edited by renergy - 4/27/12 at 12:30pm
post #35 of 49

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by renergy View Post

 

 

 

 

I see an immediate price drop after it's initial release, and then a slow steady incline in price over two years. What exactly is standard about that? Name me one other form of electronics that doesn't slowly decline in price over time.

 

 


Headphones are not electronics.  Further, the good cans seem to remain competitive in the market for a much longer period of time.

post #36 of 49
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KG Jag View Post

 

 


Headphones are not electronics.  Further, the good cans seem to remain competitive in the market for a much longer period of time.

 

Headphones are not electronics? You're gonna have to explain that one to me a little better.They have circuits in them, they use electrictiy. Seems to meet the definition of electronics to me. 

post #37 of 49

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by renergy View Post

 

 

Headphones are not electronics? You're gonna have to explain that one to me a little better.They have circuits in them, they use electrictiy. Seems to meet the definition of electronics to me. 

 

So do lamps.

 

Headphones are a form of speakers and have a similar market shelf life.  I still have my Advents from decades ago.

 

Do you really think that headphones are comparable to computers in terms of market shelf life?!

post #38 of 49
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KG Jag View Post

 

 

So do lamps.

 

Headphones are a form of speakers and have a similar market shelf life.  I still have my Advents from decades ago.

 

Do you really think that headphones are comparable to computers in terms of market shelf life?!

 

 Headphones are electronics. If you can't trust the new guy on that, ask around a bit. I'm sure everyone else will agree with me. As far as your example to computers, no, there is nothing on the face of the earth that keeps up with microchips. That's Moore's law and a terrible example. But yes, I absolutely do feel that headphones have a shelf life. You have Advents from decades ago because you've been to cheap to upgrade. That doesn't mean there aren't far superior products on the market today. They just cost $4,000, which is ridiculous and the point of the whole conversation. Computer prices have stayed relatively the same for 10 years, even with an exponential increase in power ever 4 years or so, while headphones get exponentially more expensive with small increases in performance.


Edited by renergy - 4/27/12 at 8:06pm
post #39 of 49

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by renergy View Post

 

 

Actually, most lamps don't have circuits. They just have a bulb and a cord providing electricity to that bulb. Headphones are electronics. If you can't trust the new guy on that, ask around a bit. I'm sure everyone else will agree with me. As far as your example to computers, no, there is nothing on the face of the earth that keeps up with microchips. That's Moore's law and a terrible example. But yes, I absolutely do feel that headphones have a shelf life. You have Advents from decades ago because you've been to [sic] cheap to upgrade. That doesn't mean there aren't far superior products on the market today. They just cost $4,000, which is ridiculous and the point of the whole conversation. Computer prices have stayed relatively the same for 10 years, even with an exponential increase in power ever 4 years or so, while headphones get exponentially more expensive with small increases in performance.

 

No (see underlined above)--and the personal attack is not appreciated. 

 

But since you are convinced that I should have upgraded a pair of speakers that you have never heard, it is clear that you too see that the marketing shelf lives of quality headphones (how long has the HD 600 been out?) is comparable with that of quality speakers.  A no brainer really--they do essentially the same thing.


Edited by KG Jag - 4/27/12 at 2:42pm
post #40 of 49
Everything that runs on electricity or utilizes a signal has a circuit. Maybe not a circuit board, but it most definitely has a circuit. Otherwise no electricity would flow. As far as the definition of electronics, here you go.

All items sold on a public market will react in totally different ways. Depending on manufacturing costs, supply and demand, selling price, etc, these items will sell for different prices at different times while still on the market. One generalization can't cover all devices.
post #41 of 49
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KG Jag View Post

 

 

No (see underlined above)--and the personal attack is not appreciated. 

 

But since you are convinced that I should have upgraded a pair of speakers that you have never heard, it is clear that you too see that the marketing shelf lives of quality headphones (how long has the HD 600 been out?) is comparable with that of quality speakers.  A no brainer really--they do essentially the same thing.

 

my entire point was that the marketing life of headphones is too long compared to other electronics and you're argument is that headphones aren't electronics. I can't really debate you any further than that. 

post #42 of 49

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by renergy View Post

 

 

my entire point was that the marketing life of headphones is too long compared to other electronics and you're argument is that headphones aren't electronics. I can't really debate you any further than that. 

 


If that is the debate, it's one without substance in the context of this tread.  Let's leave it in the rear view and get back on topic.

post #43 of 49

Sennheiser's pricing blows.  I bought my HD555's in October 2010, and they made a fan out of me despite being mediocre.  I got them for around 80 bucks.  I can't imagine paying nearly 200 dollars for them.  Their pricing shenanigans have lost them a customer.

post #44 of 49

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Radio_head View Post

Also, I've looked into this legally in the past.  They're in the clear.

 

Not where I live. Although they raise the wholesale price to circumvent this. As a result, it's difficult to find anyone selling them in such countries. Few can turn a profit, and the ones that can are better off not selling them and directing customers to something that will make a better profit.

post #45 of 49

I bought my HD650s last November for $329 new. A year before that I bought my HD595s for $75 new. I must be born lucky. I would never have bought the HD650s at $500. Probably would have gone for a used HE-500.


Edited by juantendo8 - 4/27/12 at 9:19pm
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