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Motorcycle IEMs? - Page 3

post #31 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by texanater View Post

-snip-

 

You've made a lot of good points, though we're gonna have to agree to disagree.  I occasionally wear IEMS (actually not anymore since I replaced my helmet and can't comfortably fit them with the snugness of the new 'un) where and when I feel it is safe to do so.  Riding a motorcycle is vastly more risky than driving a car.  It's not a justifiable choice, but a calculated risk that some people find to be worth the risk.  Personally I find ambient noise to be of vast benefit in traffic/burbs riding, but somewhere between useless and a liability on the open road.

post #32 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragunov-21 View Post

 

 Personally I find ambient noise to be of vast benefit in traffic/burbs riding, but somewhere between useless and a liability on the open road.

 

 

Agree completely. Be wise enough to know when to and when not to use them. And, of course, don't let the music distract you so much that you spill your beer, or drop your cigarette.

post #33 of 74
This is a variant on the wearing protective gear or jeans and a t shirt arguement. We all have different levels of acceptable risk and ridethrough life accordingly. I don't need or want anyone to tell me what I should or shouldn't do. I've been riding from the age of twelve and have used in helmet sound of one sort or another for fifteen and covered an average of 15,000 miles a year.
Edited by GSARider - 11/1/12 at 1:11pm
post #34 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by GSARider View Post

This is a variant on the wearing protective gear or jeans and a t shirt arguement. We all have different levels of acceptable risk and ridethrough life accordingly. I don't need or want anyone to tell me what I should or shouldn't do. I've been riding from the age of twelve and have used in helmet sound of one sort or another for fifteen and covered an average of 15,000 miles a year.

Yes, they both are examples of acceptance of risk, but I think the difference is that jeans and t-shirt don't in and of themselves detract from your riding skill, whereas music or some other distractions do, or at least that is the argument. I think what we (some of us) are saying is that music isn't necessarily an added risk in some circumstances.

post #35 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonkulator View Post

Yes, they both are examples of acceptance of risk, but I think the difference is that jeans and t-shirt don't in and of themselves detract from your riding skill, whereas music or some other distractions do, or at least that is the argument. I think what we (some of us) are saying is that music isn't necessarily an added risk in some circumstances.


Yeah and those circumstances are when you aren't operating a vehicle. Not saying I'm perfect either because I'm not. Sometime I'll drive with my IEMs on which I know isn't the best idea either. But considering they don't isolate the greatest and that I'm in a car makes me feel a bit more safe. On a motorcycle or bike I'd feel way to exposed too take the risk. Now if I was riding in a safe area where there was barely any traffic I can see it. But you never know and that is the scary part. People just don't respect people on bikes.

post #36 of 74
B the same argument ear plugs are unsafe too then. Mostly I can't hear anything above my engine with earplugs in.
post #37 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonkulator View Post

Yes, they both are examples of acceptance of risk, but I think the difference is that jeans and t-shirt don't in and of themselves detract from your riding skill, whereas music or some other distractions do, or at least that is the argument. I think what we (some of us) are saying is that music isn't necessarily an added risk in some circumstances.

 

That is the argument, but I have yet to see anyone provide any supporting evidence for it besides "it must be distracting" or "it doesn't make you safer, so it must make you more likely to be hurt and is therefore not worth it".  The moment someone provides that for a situation outside of city/'burbs riding, I'll reassess my position.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lee730 View Post


Yeah and those circumstances are when you aren't operating a vehicle. Not saying I'm perfect either because I'm not. Sometime I'll drive with my IEMs on which I know isn't the best idea either. But considering they don't isolate the greatest and that I'm in a car makes me feel a bit more safe. On a motorcycle or bike I'd feel way to exposed too take the risk. Now if I was riding in a safe area where there was barely any traffic I can see it. But you never know and that is the scary part. People just don't respect people on bikes.

Says you.  You accept the risk of driving with IEMs (which by the argument that it's a distraction is more likely to injure others than riding with them, which is what you should be worrying about) as well as ignoring the fact that the sound insulation on modern cars is generally pretty great on its own.  I'd be surprised if you could hear anything at all in a modern (assumption, to be fair) car with IEMs in or the stereo at a moderate/loud volume. let alone anything useful.

 

You would feel more exposed on a bike/MC, which is completely your right and logical, but the fact that it's less ideal for you than what you feel most comfortable with doesn't mean anything to anyone else.

 

At the end of the day, you can drive a car proactively or passively.  You don't have that choice on a motorbike, and roadcraft is something that a lot of non-riders or inexperienced riders just don't "get".  Barring someone actively trying to hit you or running a red/intersection at significantly over the speed limit, there isn't much that a proactive, competent rider should be surprised by, because it's their job to be constantly scanning their surroundings, assessing potential risks in the vicinity and allow for other people's mistakes/stupidity/selfishness.

 

The cues that tell me when something's about to happen are not usually aural, and never aural once I'm riding at 80+kph.  That may differ for other people, which is fine, but anyone making blanket statements just doesn't know what they're talking about.

post #38 of 74

As Draganov has said, it's all about awareness and anticipation. Planning ahead and looking out for dangers such as cars at junctions or cars cutting the white line on bends. If i'm not using IEM's then i have decent earplugs which to all intents & purposes cut external sound to such an extent that I can't hear anything significant above the sound of my own engine.

post #39 of 74
I myself am looking for some IEM's. I have been riding for years and enjoy the music over tiring wind noise out in the boonies. I feel the music helps to keep me alert. At 80mph on my Busa I am either wearing earplugs or my skull candy s. I'm looking for a serious upgrade to my sound that will work in my helmet. How are them ue700's working out
post #40 of 74

Custom is the way to go. RE-262 does a good job, since it design is low profile and there is no protruding driver casing sticking out of the ear.

post #41 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by motorider View Post

I myself am looking for some IEM's. I have been riding for years and enjoy the music over tiring wind noise out in the boonies. I feel the music helps to keep me alert. At 80mph on my Busa I am either wearing earplugs or my skull candy s. I'm looking for a serious upgrade to my sound that will work in my helmet. How are them ue700's working out

RE: ue700: I will quote myself: 

 

"I used the UE700s above on a recent week-long trip to California and back. The UE700s were a disappointment compared to the ER6i. The UEs sound quite good, and they fit well out of the way, but they don't isolate nearly as well as the ER6i,. They also tend to slip around, meaning I would lose the seal and have to refit. Oh well, they sound way better than the ER6i in normal listening, so they do have some value for me. If I can find a double flange for them like I have for the ER6i, they should be a lot better."

post #42 of 74
If you aren't concerned about the dangers of reduced awareness and hearing loss (any iem will have you listening at 'too loud' while riding) - then get anything cheap that's comfortable. Sound quality is not a concern - with all the external stimulus any gains by going expensive will be completely wiped out.


But I wouldn't do it (and I did it for a number of years redface.gif).
post #43 of 74

my biggest fear on the bike is of wild animals. I primarily ride on back roads where there is little traffic. the only thing im worried about hearing is the wind as im not going to hear a deer that is about to jump out in front of me. riding in the city, well I don't care for it and I try to avoid it. either way music gets paused while in traffic. this allows me to hear better than with ear plugs as the IEM's don't seal up as good as the foam plugs.

 

and no tunes = earplugs no matter what.

 

and as far as volume I usually set the volume while im parked and I don't change it. this will prevent it from being overly loud. believe It or not  I have exceptional hearing even having worked in industrial maintenance and construction all my life.

post #44 of 74
I hear that.

Long ago I drove my bike from Teton, through Yellowstone to the Northeast Gate... in the middle of the night. In quick session I almost hit 2 bison, a zig zagging rabbit, a threesome of some kind of deer, a herd of bison camped out on the road, and a pair of huge, moving balls of fur which looked like some kind of giant porcupine. I drove my bike from the middle of Canada to Montreal, Maine, Boston, New York, Seattle, San Fransico, Vegas, and Monument Valley ... and that little trip through Yellowstone was the closest I ever came to destroying my bike (and myself, and likely some innocent quadruped).

There is nothing that gets the adrenaline going like swerving through 10-12 bison like they are huge, hirsute pylons in some kind of wild west motorcycle driving course, at night.
post #45 of 74

Hmm. Im wondering how you guys wear IEMs at all when riding. Unless your helmet has slots for comm systems, earbuds for me are uncomfortable. And either touch the cushioning of my helmet, or lose seal. Personally I took some Koss Ksc-75s, trimmed/fabbed them up, and stuffed them inside my helmets padding. Still wear earplugs, and allow me to still hear traffic. On highway music is quiet, but in the city its at moderate volume. Very comfy. 

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