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Most Overrated Drummers? - Page 5

post #61 of 176

You should hear me when I'm drunkblink.gif

post #62 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonic Defender View Post

You should hear me when I'm drunkblink.gif

 

"Give the drummer some liquor"

                      CJ

                     (with apologies to James Brown)

post #63 of 176

Open question to the followers of this thread:

How long does it take for your typical cymbal to burn it? i.e. get played in?
I have myown ideas, but I'll save them for later.
post #64 of 176

Never really thought about that, I would think that after a few months of regular use the cymbals would have "changed" enough to mature their sound. On a sad note, I just sold my drums. I had stopped playing as I couldn't improve past the stage I was at, didn't have time to practice, and I wasn't having fun anymore. In a few years I will get another kit, but I will not have such a nice bass pedal (I sold my Sonor Giant Step double peddle, the one with the fabric not chains). I think I will be going electric the next time round.

post #65 of 176

I am thinking of selling my set and replacing it with an electric so I can actually play and not piss off my wife and baby or terrify the dogs...
 

post #66 of 176

Going electronic?

Heresy!angry_face.gif

 

Seriously, I realize sometimes you gotta do what to gotta do the keep the peace!frown.gif

 

I gave up playing for about 10 years..................a really big mistake. My ex-wife thought playing drums was a waste of time because I was not a Pro.   You may as well quite playing golf or hockey or soccer or tennis "because you are not a pro".confused.gif

 

The whole playing in thing.....I just picked up a new 20" Constantinople Medium Thin Ride 4 weeks ago.  I find that if I use it as a crash 10-20% of the time it breaks in faster, surprising how much the sound has changed after 4 weeks.

I remember it took a bout 2-4 years for my 20" K Zildjian Pre-Aged Thin Dry Ride to settle down. 

 

The changes I hear in Hi Hats are always more subtle, if any.

post #67 of 176
Thread Starter 

Cymbal burn in? I have never heard of or experienced such a thing before...

 

It would be really nice to have an electronic set for practicing at home so I wouldn't have to drive down to the studio just to play drums.

 

Edit: Also Chris J, those are some beautiful cymbals!


Edited by manveru - 6/7/12 at 9:37am
post #68 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by manveru View Post

Cymbal burn in? I have never heard of or experienced such a thing before...

It would be really nice to have an electronic set for practicing at home so I wouldn't have to drive down to the studio just to play drums.

Edit: Also Chris J, those are some beautiful cymbals!

Yeah, really! I find that some of those cymbals sound better, mellower after being played for a few weeks or even months.

I got a set of 5 practice pads on a frame a few years ago, you can attach a bass pedal to it so I can practice without driving anyone nuts!

Don't worry, I'm not going to ask you any weird questions like " do electronic drums burn in?"

Thanks for the comments on the cymbals"biggrin.gif
post #69 of 176

I never really thought about cymbal "burn-in" before but it makes sense. Perhaps continued hits act like shot peen stress relieving of the brass until the internal stresses normalize and the sound settles in.  Works for me!

 

I have not played an acoustic set in about 30 years now.  I. too, foolishly gave up playing believing I would not improve to the point of my own high standards so why bother?  Pretty stupid really.  I now have a set of Roland electronic V-Drums in my basement that i can wail on whenever I want without disturbing a soul. I still kinda suck but I am getting better because I am playing more.  E-cymbals leave a lot to be desired although the Zildjian Gen 16 hybrids show promise.

post #70 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveA View Post

I never really thought about cymbal "burn-in" before but it makes sense. Perhaps continued hits act like shot peen stress relieving of the brass until the internal stresses normalize and the sound settles in.  Works for me!

I have not played an acoustic set in about 30 years now.  I. too, foolishly gave up playing believing I would not improve to the point of my own high standards so why bother?  Pretty stupid really.  I now have a set of Roland electronic V-Drums in my basement that i can wail on whenever I want without disturbing a soul. I still kinda suck but I am getting better because I am playing more.  E-cymbals leave a lot to be desired although the Zildjian Gen 16 hybrids show promise.


Hmmmm, the shot peen press thing makes sense.
Though I gotta suspect what manveru said on another thread: the dirt ground into the cymbal must have something to do with it too.


My philosophical thought for the day:
Dude, never, ever give up your instrument!
post #71 of 176
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris J View Post

Hmmmm, the shot peen press thing makes sense.
Though I gotta suspect what manveru said on another thread: the dirt ground into the cymbal must have something to do with it too.

 

Could be a combo effect. I'm also wondering now though, how many times was a cymbal banged around or struck during the manufacturing process? Especially hammered cymbals. Hmmm.

post #72 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris J View Post


Hmmmm, the shot peen press thing makes sense.
Though I gotta suspect what manveru said on another thread: the dirt ground into the cymbal must have something to do with it too.
My philosophical thought for the day:
Dude, never, ever give up your instrument!

Chris - Amen to that brother!  I wish I had those lost years back playing.  Funny, I run into old gray dudes like myself all the time in Sam Ash and Guitar Center who have or are in the process of reconnecting with their musical selves.  We kick ourselves in our collective butts for having given up the sheer joy of music making for various stupid, arbitrary reasons.

 

Steve

post #73 of 176

I already am kicking myself in the ass, but I can live with my decision. I intend to get a new set, either electric or acoustic, when I finish university in about a year and a half. This place also contributed to the demise of my drummer persona, I became an avid listener. I must say, that after long breaks I play better. I end up listening to music and playing the drums is like riding a bike, you never forget and the rust falls away quickly.

post #74 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonic Defender View Post

I already am kicking myself in the ass, but I can live with my decision. I intend to get a new set, either electric or acoustic, when I finish university in about a year and a half. This place also contributed to the demise of my drummer persona, I became an avid listener. I must say, that after long breaks I play better. I end up listening to music and playing the drums is like riding a bike, you never forget and the rust falls away quickly.

Yep, I went way to university to study for 4 years, I landed up NOT playing drums when I was away, but after 4 years of university I ended up spending another 6 years not playing, except for a brief 3 month period where I struggled to get back into it, and gave up again.............bad idea.   After 10 years I decided to start back from the very basics and haven't stopped since.

post #75 of 176

Good to hear Chris J, I tend to think musicians get better with age so there is hope for me yet!

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