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What is headphone "burn in" and do I need it? - Page 3

post #31 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyman392 View Post

I haven't heard much about cable burn in, a lot of people seem to believe in it though, but without proper proof.  The idea that cables to oxidize in the duration of their life can push the idea that cables can burn in.  Oxidation can lower the radius of the actual metal the electrical signal has to travel through which means increased resistance.  This increased resistance means a possible change of sound.  My question is, is this increased resistance enough on its own, or is there something else going on?

With many aftermarket cables on the market the oxidation is only changing the metal used for plating, and not the actual conductive material itself. So the effect in such a case would be placebo, and not a perceivable one.


 

 

post #32 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fizz View Post

With many aftermarket cables on the market the oxidation is only changing the metal used for plating, and not the actual conductive material itself. So the effect in such a case would be placebo, and not a perceivable one.


 

 



Oxidation specific to copper cables, IE rust on copper cables is possible (they turn green for a reason :p).  And that does effect the conductive material.  The question is whether or not this change is audible.  On such a small scale, a small change due to rusting is certainly a possibility for a change in sound to happen.  The question still remains, can the human ear hear it (remember, it is sensitive)? 

 

Silver on the other hand, only tarnishes, and that takes way to long to have any effect.  The fact that the silver is coated makes it even harder for any Hydrogen Sulfide to get in.  I have no clue why people hear those effects, or even why they hear the effects.  Could it be placebo?  At the current moment, we can't call anything placebo since we don't know what deceived is (is not hearing it the deceived response in question, or is hearing the deceived response in question).  We have no proof for either one, so I wouldn't label it placebo.  I would just call it unproven either way. 

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