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**Hifiman HE-400 Impressions and Discussion Thread** - Page 622

post #9316 of 17053

There was a thread here somewhere with pictures of all 4 drivers. As far as I remember first are black, then they had some whiteish/transparent, then the third had a yellow/brownish which had the problems.

 

Just checked the ones I got and they are white/transparent. I still think the treble is a little too big for me but I don't get fatigued and they don't sound harsh or painful like the DT990s did for me. Which is good. The headphones are comfortable, I am even wearing glasses and they still feel fine, not too good but not annoying either. Still, I actually am surprised how big they are.

 

Also, getting the pads back on again was quite irritating but I managed.

post #9317 of 17053

I thought the treble was a bit to hot for me the first few days I listened to them but after a week or so I really started to enjoy the treble and the detail they reveal.  Coming from warm IEM's it took a little time to adjust to them but now I love the sound signature of them.

post #9318 of 17053

@Jerg About the track you posted: I find 25 with +12dB quite loud. 25 with +6dB seems more suitable for me at least. That would be my normal listening level. You know, all the advice you hear about that you should be able to talk to people while listening to music and stuff... I might want to get a SPL meter.

post #9319 of 17053

I'm surprise to hear people say how the velours are too stiff and itchy etc.  I find them to be fine and like them.  I appreciate them being slightly stiff, although comfy, to make sure my ears doesn't touch and don't think they are itchy at all.  Maybe it's because I've been using too many headphones with pleather/leather to know any better.  I'm sure the senns velours are better, but still HE400 to me is quite acceptable/enjoyable.

post #9320 of 17053
Quote:
Originally Posted by soundeffect View Post

I'm surprise to hear people say how the velours are too stiff and itchy etc.  I find them to be fine and like them.  I appreciate them being slightly stiff, although comfy, to make sure my ears doesn't touch and don't think they are itchy at all.  Maybe it's because I've been using too many headphones with pleather/leather to know any better.  I'm sure the senns velours are better, but still HE400 to me is quite acceptable/enjoyable.
I'm in the "stiff and itchy" camp, but it's probably because most of my listening experience has been with Beyer velours. I have a hard time with pleather, too.
Edited by teofilrocks - 4/3/13 at 7:54am
post #9321 of 17053
Quote:
Originally Posted by soundeffect View Post

I'm surprise to hear people say how the velours are too stiff and itchy etc.  I find them to be fine and like them.  I appreciate them being slightly stiff, although comfy, to make sure my ears doesn't touch and don't think they are itchy at all.  Maybe it's because I've been using too many headphones with pleather/leather to know any better.  I'm sure the senns velours are better, but still HE400 to me is quite acceptable/enjoyable.

 

I think the velours are very comfortable and I have no problem wearing the HE-400 for hours at a time.  The velours also improve the SQ compared to the pleather pads imo.

post #9322 of 17053

This may be a totally newb question but: Last week I got a new pair of HE-400s and paired with my E17 they just don't seem loud enough. I push the E17 to near max volume (55/60) at 0dB gain and it still leaves volume to be desired. Should I push the gain to +6dB? Will that degrade the sound quality? Anybody else have problems with the HE-400s not seeming loud enough? Thanks!

post #9323 of 17053
Quote:
Originally Posted by teofilrocks View Post


I'm in the "stiff and itchy" camp, but it's probably because most of my listening experience has been with Beyer velour's. I have a hard time with pleather, too.


They are stiff without a doubt, but I don't see the itchy part. either way, I don't see the stiffness is a distraction or a comfort issue.  I've been contemplating on trying out either the DT990 or the DT880. 

 

How does do you like the DT990 compare to the HE400 in your opinion?

post #9324 of 17053

To those concerned about their listening / SPL levels -

 

80-90 dB for prolonged periods WILL damage your ears (1-2 hours).

 

Many speaker systems, especially those of high quality, can reach well over 100 dB (say into the 110 dB range). Given the power of the O2 and the HE-400s, I estimated awhile ago that about 115 dB is possible (the excess is 'headroom' - meaning I don't want to listen that loud, I just want compensation available for weaker source material). The power delivery of the amp is not linear, and it has protection built in, so realistically I'm guessing that those who listen between 9 O'Clock and 12 O'clock are within a safe range (that is about where I can be without experiencing fatigue rapidly). Max O2 power is waaay too much for typical recordings.

 

To understand what 80dB sounds like, get in your typical car and drive down the highway. Even with the windows up, typical cars are putting approximately 70-74 dB to your ears. Now keep turning up the radio until you have totally drowned out the noise. Now, pull over completely and shut off the car. Wait a few moments. Turn it back on, and listen. The sound glaring at you is probably approximately 80 dB or so (or 'twice as loud' as 70 dB). Given the noisy environment of a car, it is a great place to damage your hearing!

 

In a quiet living room, the ambient noise level is typically going to be in the 30-40 dB range (I believe). Therefore, a speaker system of any type should easily overcome the noise, and provide good listening at a safe volume level. Now fill that room with people and alcohol, and bear witness to speaker systems reaching peak volumes in-home - you are back into the 80-100 dB range depending on how good the party is. : ) 

 

Remember that most headphones require 1mW to reach 90 dB or so, which is already approaching ear-splitting. That is, 1/1000 of a watt. Many stand-up or car speakers required only 1 full watt to reach the same volume, and only 50-100 to reach extreme volumes.

 

Some of you that are most concerned about your ears would be wise to pass on the 10 Watt Super-Amps frequently claimed to be 'required' for headphones such as ours. They are not. The power is typically an utter waste, unless you spend all your time listening to Classical or High-Dynamic-Range recordings. Some of which, btw, being uncomfortable since they hit you with peaks that can be extremely jarring.

post #9325 of 17053

To those that do not like the treble of the HE-400:

 

I don't get it!

 

My former headphone of choice (HD-595) had treble that was 'smooth' but very recessed in comparison. It tended to make a lot of recordings more boring.

 

My current solution has been a switch away from Foobar. I used the windows mixer to boost bass by 6 dB@ 50 hz, and WMP to cut treble -3 @ 8khz and 16khz. It actually sounds quite awesome that way, and the 'fun bass' is great. I use the windows mixer because I have been into Pandora lately and Youtube.

 

With the HE-400, I find that 'sibilance' is more a recording problem than a headphone problem. If you experience sibilence, you need to focus in on the 1-4 Khz (not 10 khz) range. I've been saying a lot that the human vocal range is actually quite limited (majority is between about 300 hz-2 Khz). So don't waste your time tweaking the frequencies of minimal human / instrument use. You can't get a good result because you are not in the right range.

post #9326 of 17053
Quote:
Originally Posted by soundeffect View Post

How does do you like the DT990 compare to the HE400 in your opinion?

I didn't own them at the same time, unfortunately. The DT990 Pro was the first investment I made in good headphones a few years ago and I loved them. Comfort and bass was the standout enjoyment (although they, too, had a bit of a clamp). After a while I sold them in search of greener pastures. When I came upon the HE-400 last year I was immediately impressed. I can't compare specifics, but I wouldn't hesitate to say that everything goes up with the HE-400. Bass precision and impact were just standout the best I'd heard, still is. The only things I can say for sure that were downgrades were comfort and isolation. Not that the DT990 Pro isolates a whole bunch, but its grille fabric was better at not forcing my colleagues to hear everything that was playing. Oh, and the cord/connectors on the HE are a bit if a pain sometimes.
post #9327 of 17053
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrMateoHead View Post

To those that do not like the treble of the HE-400:

 

I don't get it!

 

My former headphone of choice (HD-595) had treble that was 'smooth' but very recessed in comparison. It tended to make a lot of recordings more boring.

 

My current solution has been a switch away from Foobar. I used the windows mixer to boost bass by 6 dB@ 50 hz, and WMP to cut treble -3 @ 8khz and 16khz. It actually sounds quite awesome that way, and the 'fun bass' is great. I use the windows mixer because I have been into Pandora lately and Youtube.

 

With the HE-400, I find that 'sibilance' is more a recording problem than a headphone problem. If you experience sibilence, you need to focus in on the 1-4 Khz (not 10 khz) range. I've been saying a lot that the human vocal range is actually quite limited (majority is between about 300 hz-2 Khz). So don't waste your time tweaking the frequencies of minimal human / instrument use. You can't get a good result because you are not in the right range.

 

I totally agree with you one the sibilance issue.  I haven't had any sibilance unless the recording is bad and I could listen to that same song through my XBA-1 IEM that's warm with smooth treble and you'd still have a bit of sibilance with them.

 

I found Foobar to have to much of a warm signature and I didn't like that with the warm IEM's I used to listen to because it made them to warm and even some dark at time.  With the HE-400 its not to bad but I still like to use WMP if I'm listening through my PC which isn't that often.

post #9328 of 17053

It is indeed indicative of the recordings moreso than the actual headphone, but who cares?  The bottom line is there's still a problem, and reducing the HE-400's upper treble to be more in-line with completely neutral goes a long way in helping these.  Even in really well recorded songs, things such as the hi-hat stand out far too much with the HE-400.  Once again though, it's an easy fix to just EQ the upper treble down with a gentle rolloff, so I pity anybody whose either not liked and/or sold the HE-400 mainly because of its treble.

post #9329 of 17053

I guess I like the treble because I listen to mainly EDM and you need good detailed highs.  I've always been a person that's hated bright treble (my favorite IEM's are all warm with smooth highs) but for some reason I like the HE-400's.  If they really bother you EQ'ing them down helps as that's what I did for the first few days listening to the HE-400 because the treble was to bright for me but after my brain got more used to it I put them back to neutral and have had it like that ever since.

post #9330 of 17053

Attenuating the treble won't make the treble less detailed.

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