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**Hifiman HE-400 Impressions and Discussion Thread** - Page 258

post #3856 of 18629
I've already mentioned that it's a non-issue and that Sinegen will find an imbalance or more on any headphone they test. So again...

IT'S A NON-ISSUE.
post #3857 of 18629
Quote:
Originally Posted by conquerator2 View Post

 

No please! Dont mention these... I was thinking there could be an imblance of some sort between the drivers...

Well my HE-6 just told me I shouldnt care about that and so I wont :)

My HE-6 impedance measures somewhere around 62,2 ohms in one and 62.8 ohms in the other so roughly within 0.5 ohms. It is still higher than the supposed 50 ohms thou :D

Could that pose a problem or will these measurements lower with use (measured on the day they arrived, without any headtime orburn in, right off the box

 

Thanks! Luke


Out of curiosity, how did you arrive at that, I assume, nominal value?

 

BTW I long ago gave up fretting over minutia such as correct speaker toe-in, cartridge tracking angle (turntables) etc as it just drove me nuts blink.gif.

post #3858 of 18629
Quote:
Originally Posted by griff2 View Post


Out of curiosity, how did you arrive at that, I assume, nominal value?

 

BTW I long ago gave up fretting over minutia such as correct speaker toe-in, cartridge tracking angle (turntables) etc as it just drove me nuts blink.gif.

 

I figured I might as well fork out the headphones I used to love but at a certain point started to despise them :)

 

And... yeah the things you mentioned would drive me nuts as well :)

post #3859 of 18629

My HE500's measure 44 Ohm - 32 Ohm, yet they sound perfectly fine (in terms of FR matching as well as volume balance). It seems the impedance values of planars don't mean much.

post #3860 of 18629
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerg View Post

My HE500's measure 44 Ohm - 32 Ohm, yet they sound perfectly fine (in terms of FR matching as well as volume balance). It seems the impedance values of planars don't mean much.

 

 

alright thanks! Also, here is the old Silver cable :) Apparent from the Silver "newer" cable we actually have a sheath here :D I think the cable sounds really good. Somewhere inbetween stock and aftermarket :)

Certainly makes the HE-6 highs very detailed and extended :D

 

 

1000

post #3861 of 18629
If you cannot hear something during normal play what is the difference. I have never seen a headphone this good picked apart for no reason
post #3862 of 18629
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerg View Post

My HE500's measure 44 Ohm - 32 Ohm, yet they sound perfectly fine (in terms of FR matching as well as volume balance). It seems the impedance values of planars don't mean much.


How have you measures that?  If you're using a multi tester set to the omega symbol that's DC resistance.  Impedance is more complicated than that: it's like an average, at a specific frequency (because we're dealing with an alternating current here, not DC).  Nominal impedance, is sort of like the the average that I just mentioned but averaged over the the entire frequency spectrum used - it's been a long time since I did physics, so electrical/electronic engineers feel free to correct me on this.

post #3863 of 18629
I guess the nominal impedance is that of the standard frequency at wich the other measurements are done (1kHz). I don't know if it's a norm or just common practice, though (e.g. some frequency which gives the best figures).
post #3864 of 18629
Quote:
Originally Posted by griff2 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by jerg View Post

My HE500's measure 44 Ohm - 32 Ohm, yet they sound perfectly fine (in terms of FR matching as well as volume balance). It seems the impedance values of planars don't mean much.


How have you measures that?  If you're using a multi tester set to the omega symbol that's DC resistance.  Impedance is more complicated than that: it's like an average, at a specific frequency (because we're dealing with an alternating current here, not DC).  Nominal impedance, is sort of like the the average that I just mentioned but averaged over the the entire frequency spectrum used - it's been a long time since I did physics, so electrical/electronic engineers feel free to correct me on this.

Yep, using a volt/ohm meter just measures DC resistance. Impedance is the resistance at a specific phase/frequency. Headroom shows charts that include impedance across the 20-20k range. The 400s show pretty consistant impedance at 50ohms: http://www.headphone.com/headphones/hifiman-he-400.php#tabs
post #3865 of 18629
Quote:
Originally Posted by griff2 View Post


How have you measures that?  If you're using a multi tester set to the omega symbol that's DC resistance.  Impedance is more complicated than that: it's like an average, at a specific frequency (because we're dealing with an alternating current here, not DC).  Nominal impedance, is sort of like the the average that I just mentioned but averaged over the the entire frequency spectrum used - it's been a long time since I did physics, so electrical/electronic engineers feel free to correct me on this.

 

I'm not in the audio business so I don't know if the nominal impedance is some kind of average value or if it's just a measurement on a specific frequency. You are right about impedance though, it consists of 3 components, the resistance which is the component you measure if you have a normal multimeter set on the omega symbol. Then you got the inductive reactance which is the resistance property of coils, and then you also got the capacitive reactance which is the resistance of capacitors. The two latter work against each other, if you have exactly the same capacitive reactance and inductive reactance they cancel each other out and your left with only pure resistance. This causes resonance by the way.

 

But anyways, the two latter also depend on the frequency passing through the components, so that's why you can't measure impedance as easily as pure resistance.

post #3866 of 18629

pleather without spacers is sooo comfortable.

post #3867 of 18629
Quote:
Originally Posted by earphiler View Post

pleather without spacers is sooo comfortable.

I don't know if it's because I have ears that stick out a lot, but when I take the spacers out my ears touch the cloth fabric, and if I move the headphone around I can even feel the drivers -_-

post #3868 of 18629

Mine are very close to touching the driver (pleather, no spacers), but its less head clamp without spacers!

 

can't imagine velour with them :D
 


Edited by earphiler - 12/29/12 at 5:21pm
post #3869 of 18629
Quote:
Originally Posted by earphiler View Post

pleather without spacers is sooo comfortable.

They are very soft indeed, a bit shallow though. And the sound is awful compared to the velours.

post #3870 of 18629
Quote:
Originally Posted by earphiler View Post

Mine are very close to touching the driver (pleather, no spacers), but its less head clamp without spacers!

 

can't imagine velour with them :D
 

Velour are a bit thicker than pleathers though, so it will be more clamp no matter what. But then at the same time it'll mean less "ears rubbing against hard drivers".

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