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Schiit Mjolnir headphone amplifier - Page 120

post #1786 of 3200
Quote:
Originally Posted by keph View Post

My Mjolnir still no news/update since the 16 Oct... Still at the Chinese Customs... Dammit.....mad.gif

They are breaking in your new Mjolnir for you....It should have a few hundred hours on it when you receive it.  tongue.gif

post #1787 of 3200
Quote:
Originally Posted by longbowbbs View Post

They are breaking in your new Mjolnir for you....It should have a few hundred hours on it when you receive it.  tongue.gif

They should charge a small fee for such a convenient feature.

post #1788 of 3200

I believe there IS a burn in surcharge!

post #1789 of 3200
Quote:
Originally Posted by longbowbbs View Post

I believe there IS a burn in surcharge!

Per every 100 hours.tongue.gif

post #1790 of 3200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris J View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by IEMCrazy View Post

And in the name of all that is good avoid any of their UPS units.  Not only have I found them to consistently fail, but they have a lousy habit of overcharging batteries to the point of leakage.  They're a fire hazard. 

Then again I've heard of some of the new APC Smart-UPS units erupting in flame too...so it may be "industry standard" these days mad.gif

Brickwall type surge protectors (no MOVs, it's all relay based) are good for lightening in the line.

I worked in the UPS field for over 8 years.
I've never heard of a battery catching fire.confused.gif

A relay will not open fast enough to protect your equipment from a surge.
For some reason audiophiles hate MOVs.  confused_face_2.gif
MOVs actually work.

Anyway, try this, buy a 120/240 Vac, 2 pole, 4 wire, Hubbell or Leibert surge arrestor system and get an electrician to wire it into the main electrical panel in your home.

Agreed, a whole-house surge arrestor has been my first line of defense for over a decade now. We get a LOT of brownouts and spikes where I'm at, and nothing has ever fried. Mine is an old "Cutler-Hammer Clipper", best $200 I ever spent! It has status lights so you know it's still doing its job, and has two-line telephone and coaxial antenna surge protection as well.
post #1791 of 3200

Sorry the post is just too funny when you consider your location is... in your head :D


Edited by Solude - 11/6/12 at 4:23am
post #1792 of 3200

Since I recently just plowed through this thread , I figured I'd do other users a favor, and collected the most relevant Schiit Mjolnir Reviews and Impressions in this wiki :  

 

http://www.head-fi.org/a/schiit-mjolnir-reviews-and-impressions-collected

 

Feel free to contribute or edit... =)


Edited by ardilla - 11/6/12 at 4:59am
post #1793 of 3200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris J View Post

 

I worked in the UPS field for over 8 years.

I've never heard of a battery catching fire.confused.gif

 

A relay will not open fast enough to protect your equipment from a surge.

For some reason audiophiles hate MOVs.  confused_face_2.gif

MOVs actually work.

 

Anyway, try this, buy a 120/240 Vac, 2 pole, 4 wire, Hubbell or Leibert surge arrestor system and get an electrician to wire it into the main electrical panel in your home.

 

Tell that to the Belkin that was pouring acid all over the cabinet and still charging without ever warning that the battery was due for replacement (despite having an indicator for that purpose.)!  Mine didn't burst into flames....but if I ignored it longer I'd rather not have found out.

 

It's not an audiophile thing, I've heard of datacenter operators that hate MOVs and have found that a failed MOV can cause damage in strange ways.  While I've not personally had such issues, it's an important thing to consider.  Brickwall type, you're right is not a relay, it's an inductor.  Personally I haven't purchased those due to price, but they certainly have a lot of merit, and are a much more industrial approach to the problem. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by purrin View Post

Maybe a party official is borrowing it?

 

Maybe it was requisitioned by Fang to figure out EF-6-r2? wink.gif

post #1794 of 3200
Quote:
Originally Posted by IEMCrazy View Post

Tell that to the Belkin that was pouring acid all over the cabinet and still charging without ever warning that the battery was due for replacement (despite having an indicator for that purpose.)!  Mine didn't burst into flames....but if I ignored it longer I'd rather not have found out.

It's not an audiophile thing, I've heard of datacenter operators that hate MOVs and have found that a failed MOV can cause damage in strange ways.  While I've not personally had such issues, it's an important thing to consider.  Brickwall type, you're right is not a relay, it's an inductor.  Personally I haven't purchased those due to price, but they certainly have a lot of merit, and are a much more industrial approach to the problem. 


Maybe it was requisitioned by Fang to figure out EF-6-r2? wink.gif

When I was closely involved with that stuff, we didn't sell cheap UPSs and power conditioners. We were not a commodity vendor.
All I can tell you is with all the battery failures I saw (and I saw A LOT!) I never saw a battery go up in flames. Saw a few leak acid though.

Not too sure why the datacentre operators don't like MOVs. Just like anything else, they MUST have some form of overcurrent protection. A good power bar will have some overcurrent protection. Don't buy cheap ones, you really do get exactly what you pay for.
In my experience, the data centre guys know nothing about power conditioners and everything about mainframes.

Like I said, I worked in the power conditioning field for several years, and I have to get back into it for a variety of reasons, but I gotta say, I don't know what you mean by a brickwall type?redface.gif

BTW, I saw the results of some unfused MOVs once, result: an electrical distribution panel that went up in flames.
post #1795 of 3200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris J View Post


When I was closely involved with that stuff, we didn't sell cheap UPSs and power conditioners. We were not a commodity vendor.
All I can tell you is with all the battery failures I saw (and I saw A LOT!) I never saw a battery go up in flames. Saw a few leak acid though.
Not too sure why the datacentre operators don't like MOVs. Just like anything else, they MUST have some form of overcurrent protection. A good power bar will have some overcurrent protection. Don't buy cheap ones, you really do get exactly what you pay for.
In my experience, the data centre guys know nothing about power conditioners and everything about mainframes.
Like I said, I worked in the power conditioning field for several years, and I have to get back into it for a variety of reasons, but I gotta say, I don't know what you mean by a brickwall type?redface.gif
BTW, I saw the results of some unfused MOVs once, result: an electrical distribution panel that went up in flames.

 

Heh, well, as you said, you didn't work with the sucktastic commodity stuff.  It's a different world.  Shame I got rid of the Belkin, you'd have had a field day looking at that thing.  I suspect the gear you worked with recognized an EOL battery not taking a charge rather than trying to charge the leaking years-old battery indefinitely and getting increasingly hotter eek.gif 

 

While that's a fire hazard the ones I've read (more than one) story about bursting into flames is the new model 1500VA APC SmartUPS models.  Not the old venerable ones that run for decades...the new ones with the LCD displays on them.  I don't know what they did wrong but there's got to be a serious design or production flaw to do that.  Or bad batteries...I remember when APC used to use BB and CSB.  They've been using generics since the Schneider buyout at the same inflated prices.  angry_face.gif

 

Brickwall is a manufacturer of surge protectors and conditioners (brickwall.com.)  Inductor rather than MOV based.  They're not the only manufacturer of such things there's a few companies, they're just the first name I tend to think of from industrial applications.  Sadly there's definitively FUD involved in their marketing, but the actual products are what they should be.  I haven't personally owned one...the pricing is outrageous and more suited to government-contractor bulk buys.  I suspect anyone ordering in quantity, which would be the majority of their real market,  isn't paying those prices.

 

All that said, I still stand by my thoughts: The best way to protect your audio gear is not to plug it in when there's known bad weather.  To cover the every-day sags and surges, any half decent conditioner/protector should do the job, except maybe some rare event.  If you have dirty power in general...then isolation transformers, online UPS's, and heavy conditioners may be needed to cean it up.

post #1796 of 3200
Quote:
Originally Posted by IEMCrazy View Post

 

Heh, well, as you said, you didn't work with the sucktastic commodity stuff.  It's a different world.  Shame I got rid of the Belkin, you'd have had a field day looking at that thing.  I suspect the gear you worked with recognized an EOL battery not taking a charge rather than trying to charge the leaking years-old battery indefinitely and getting increasingly hotter eek.gif 

 

While that's a fire hazard the ones I've read (more than one) story about bursting into flames is the new model 1500VA APC SmartUPS models.  Not the old venerable ones that run for decades...the new ones with the LCD displays on them.  I don't know what they did wrong but there's got to be a serious design or production flaw to do that.  Or bad batteries...I remember when APC used to use BB and CSB.  They've been using generics since the Schneider buyout at the same inflated prices.  angry_face.gif

 

Brickwall is a manufacturer of surge protectors and conditioners (brickwall.com.)  Inductor rather than MOV based.  They're not the only manufacturer of such things there's a few companies, they're just the first name I tend to think of from industrial applications.  Sadly there's definitively FUD involved in their marketing, but the actual products are what they should be.  I haven't personally owned one...the pricing is outrageous and more suited to government-contractor bulk buys.  I suspect anyone ordering in quantity, which would be the majority of their real market,  isn't paying those prices.

 

All that said, I still stand by my thoughts: The best way to protect your audio gear is not to plug it in when there's known bad weather.  To cover the every-day sags and surges, any half decent conditioner/protector should do the job, except maybe some rare event.  If you have dirty power in general...then isolation transformers, online UPS's, and heavy conditioners may be needed to cean it up.

 

Ah, the good olde days!

When men were men and batteries were batteries!

I guess it's asking too much to current limit a battery chargers output................wink_face.gif

The batteries don't surprise me too much, UPS vendors usually buy the cheapest batteries they can get their hands on.

UPSs have gotten cheaper......................hmmm.

 

I agree 100% with the unplugging thing.

That's what I do during thunderstorms!

 

An inductor will not do what an MOV does.

Despite Brickwall's marketing shlock, an inductor is a noise filter (which is cool), an MOV is a surge arrestor.

Audiophiles may not like the current limiting a Brickwall surge arrestor will add to their power amp.

Oye vay!

Maybe they have some nice military contracts?


Edited by Chris J - 11/7/12 at 4:33pm
post #1797 of 3200

Are there any available hardware methods, outside of software dithering, to reduce the gain on the Mjolnir (or perhaps Gungnir)?  Driving JH16 IEMs with the Mjolnir and Gungnir (sounds phenomenal), but can't play them at low volume due to channel imbalance on anything below 8 o'clock position.  Currently using MBIT+ software dithering (via Audirvana Plus) at the expense of digital signal integrity.

post #1798 of 3200

If your software is doing the processing at 32 bits or more (assuming 16 bit source), you won't lose anything if you use software volume control to reduce volume down even significantly. Otherwise you could use a digital mixer (with internal processing at higher bits than source obviously.)

 

I think Audirvana Plus processes internally at 64 bits.

post #1799 of 3200

Good to know.  Thanks purrin.

post #1800 of 3200

A 120 page read finally completed. Headfiers should garner some sort of electronic badge next to their avatar for perusing through any 100+ page thread.

 

I have about 5 days of listening under my belt with the Mjolnir & Gungnir. This amp needs a few days or what others claim to be roughly 100 hours of break-in to settle down. In my opinion, the Mjolnir must be paired with a suitable source as it is very revealing. If something is awry then it's probably the source. The Gungnir, equivalent, or better are a must. After break-in, I found the M&G combination offered by Schiit to be a good pairing when used with Hifiman HE-5LE. A tinge of apprehension crept into my psyche when I thought about pairing the HE-5LE. Some of the initial impressions of edginess and fatigue were foreboding. I found this to be the case out of the box, but after some break-in time, the pairing is revealing yet smooth and relaxing when listening to certain music music genres/recordings. 

 

Furthermore, thumbs up to Schiit for imbuing the Mjolnir & Gungnir with a clean aesthetic design. It reminds me of the Brauhaus design principles, "Art and Technology: A new unity", or Louis Sullivan's principle, "Form Follows Function".


Edited by Usagi - 11/10/12 at 5:16pm
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