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New Leckerton UHA-6S MKII Portable Headphone Amplifier Announced (Update User Impressions Added... - Page 80

post #1186 of 2193

yeah. gain is at low.

the UD100 don't have a dedicated line-out port. it does however - should bypass its internal amp. when connected to an ext. amp and the volume is at 100%.

 

i guess it still amplifies the signal somehow.. 

post #1187 of 2193
Quote:
Originally Posted by eyal1983 View Post

yeah. gain is at low.
the UD100 don't have a dedicated line-out port. it does however - should bypass its internal amp. when connected to an ext. amp and the volume is at 100%.

i guess it still amplifies the signal somehow.. 

Drop your computers /dacs volume to 75%.
post #1188 of 2193

done... i hope it doesn't affect the the SQ.

post #1189 of 2193
Quote:
Originally Posted by eyal1983 View Post

done... i hope it doesn't affect the the SQ.

No it won't. If you want you can try creeping up to 80% 85% but you must back away and use a sensible amount from your computer. What you want is to be able to almost max out the amp without distortion. So just have some trial and error play with the computers volume, there will be a sweet spot.
post #1190 of 2193
Quote:
Originally Posted by eyal1983 View Post

yeah. gain is at low.
the UD100 don't have a dedicated line-out port. it does however - should bypass its internal amp. when connected to an ext. amp and the volume is at 100%.

i guess it still amplifies the signal somehow.. 

What 100% means is that the signal going through your UD100's amplifier circuit is unattenuated. Unless the device has a way of knowing that you have an amp connected rather than headphones, it's going to treat your amp like a headphone that has to be driven very loudly.
post #1191 of 2193

Got a couple more questions regarding the amp if some doesn't mind answering. How does the amp pair with the CLAS, which i'll be using? Does this combination have good synergy? Finally how does it sound with the ie80? Finding hard to wait till the 25th to be able to order :(.

post #1192 of 2193
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by esuhgb View Post

Got a couple more questions regarding the amp if some doesn't mind answering. How does the amp pair with the CLAS, which i'll be using? Does this combination have good synergy? Finally how does it sound with the ie80? Finding hard to wait till the 25th to be able to order :(.


Check back at the end of the month. I'll be ordering a CLAS around that time.

post #1193 of 2193

Hi ll,

why is it, when i lower the volume (below 7 o'clock, then (and only then) on the right channel i hear much "louder" than the right's ?

post #1194 of 2193
Quote:
Originally Posted by eyal1983 View Post

Hi ll,

why is it, when i lower the volume (below 7 o'clock, then (and only then) on the right channel i hear much "louder" than the right's ?


That is channel imbalance due to the volume pot on the Leckerton. Most amps suffer this having volume pots instead of digital pots. But with digital pots you do sacrifice some transparency so its a give and take sort of thing. By far my Triad L3 is the best portable amp (more transportable TBH) in terms of near to no channel imbalance at very low volume listening. In fact I think it is so good I'd be more apt to think it's a digital pot. cool.gif


Edited by lee730 - 1/5/13 at 2:41am
post #1195 of 2193
Quote:
Originally Posted by eyal1983 View Post

Hi ll,
why is it, when i lower the volume (below 7 o'clock, then (and only then) on the right channel i hear much "louder" than the right's ?

Yep, it's normal, most amps with a volume pot do this. smile.gif
post #1196 of 2193
Quote:
Originally Posted by DigitalFreak View Post


Check back at the end of the month. I'll be ordering a CLAS around that time.

Nice can't wait for some impressions.
post #1197 of 2193
Quote:
Originally Posted by lee730 View Post

That is channel imbalance due to the volume pot on the Leckerton. Most amps suffer this having volume pots instead of digital pots. But with digital pots you do sacrifice some transparency so its a give and take sort of thing. By far my Triad L3 is the best portable amp (more transportable TBH) in terms of near to no channel imbalance at very low volume listening. In fact I think it is so good I'd be more apt to think it's a digital pot. cool.gif

 

The reason why volume pots have noticeable imbalance at low volume is because that's where minor variations in manufacture become more noticeable.

 

Volume pots mostly work by having a conductive resistive surface that a wiper slides along. At the near point (where volume is highest), electricity travels a very short distance along the surface; minor differences between two surfaces don't add up to much. At the far point (where volume is lowest), electricity is traveling the full length of that resistive surface, and minor differences add up.

 

Higher quality pots are more expensive in part because they require either (or both) closer attention to manufacturing tolerance or higher rates of rejection. Buy a couple dozen identical volume pots of good-not-fabulous quality and test them all at the quietest position. Some will have louder left channels, some will have louder right channels; out of the batch, maybe a couple will have a channel difference subtle enough to be tolerable or maybe imperceptible.

 

Leckerton could spec higher quality pots, but that'd drive the price of the amp up noticeably. Really good pots for non-portable devices can easily go for $50 a pop -- without having to get into the audiophile stratosphere of exotic materials and proprietary designs. You're paying the manufacturer to either spend more time making and testing each one, or for covering the cost of the greater number of rejects they have to make for each one they can sell.

 

Stepped attenuators can get around this by using actual resistor networks rather than a sweeper over a surface, but since that's literally a cluster of tolerance-matched resistors, it's going to be expensive and bulky. Expensive can be tolerated, bulky's kind of a dealbreaker. Digital attenuators have a lot of advantages (compactness, consistency) but aren't necessarily audiophile-approved.

 

I have a SR-71B. Like the Triad, it has uniform channel balance pretty nearly all the way to ∞. Like the Triad, it also costs some multiple of the price of the UHA-6, and part of that markup is to cover the cost of the higher-quality volume pot. Save some money, accept some compromises.

post #1198 of 2193

Excellent explanation.

post #1199 of 2193

I am not sure about bulky, the Glacier by TTVJ has a stepped attenuator and it must be one of the slimmest amps out there.  There is also no perceivable imbalance.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ardgedee View Post

 

The reason why volume pots have noticeable imbalance at low volume is because that's where minor variations in manufacture become more noticeable.

 

Volume pots mostly work by having a conductive resistive surface that a wiper slides along. At the near point (where volume is highest), electricity travels a very short distance along the surface; minor differences between two surfaces don't add up to much. At the far point (where volume is lowest), electricity is traveling the full length of that resistive surface, and minor differences add up.

 

Higher quality pots are more expensive in part because they require either (or both) closer attention to manufacturing tolerance or higher rates of rejection. Buy a couple dozen identical volume pots of good-not-fabulous quality and test them all at the quietest position. Some will have louder left channels, some will have louder right channels; out of the batch, maybe a couple will have a channel difference subtle enough to be tolerable or maybe imperceptible.

 

Leckerton could spec higher quality pots, but that'd drive the price of the amp up noticeably. Really good pots for non-portable devices can easily go for $50 a pop -- without having to get into the audiophile stratosphere of exotic materials and proprietary designs. You're paying the manufacturer to either spend more time making and testing each one, or for covering the cost of the greater number of rejects they have to make for each one they can sell.

 

Stepped attenuators can get around this by using actual resistor networks rather than a sweeper over a surface, but since that's literally a cluster of tolerance-matched resistors, it's going to be expensive and bulky. Expensive can be tolerated, bulky's kind of a dealbreaker. Digital attenuators have a lot of advantages (compactness, consistency) but aren't necessarily audiophile-approved.

 

I have a SR-71B. Like the Triad, it has uniform channel balance pretty nearly all the way to ∞. Like the Triad, it also costs some multiple of the price of the UHA-6, and part of that markup is to cover the cost of the higher-quality volume pot. Save some money, accept some compromises.

post #1200 of 2193
One thing I thought worth mentioning..if Nick reads this thread..

One thing that would be nice to see on the next Leckerton product would be an automatic power-off feature. It's the one thing I wish the mkII had.

I often listen and fall asleep, then wake up an hour or whatever after the music has stopped. It's probably not hurting anything, but I would rather have the amp switch off than sitting there idling.

That would make this thing perfect....Heck, it already is perfect, that would just be a reaply nice feature.
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Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Portable Headphone Amps › New Leckerton UHA-6S MKII Portable Headphone Amplifier Announced (Update User Impressions Added July 20th 2012)