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Car audio-Fi - Page 4

post #46 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by gopanthersgo1 View Post

I need a full system for under $250 for my dads truck, what do you recommend?

 

I don't think you can get a full system with that; you'd probably just get a sub and amplifier for it. Raw drivers for the front speakers may be cheap but they're usually for home audio use, so the specs are usually for a specially-designed ported enclosure, not a car door, hence most of these are unpredictable in terms of response in a car as well as usually impossible to install without more advanced fabrication.

post #47 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProtegeManiac View Post

I don't think you can get a full system with that; you'd probably just get a sub and amplifier for it. Raw drivers for the front speakers may be cheap but they're usually for home audio use, so the specs are usually for a specially-designed ported enclosure, not a car door, hence most of these are unpredictable in terms of response in a car as well as usually impossible to install without more advanced fabrication.
Well he'd need a new receiver, and would car speakers work fine?
post #48 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by gopanthersgo1 View Post


Well he'd need a new receiver, and would car speakers work fine?

 

Depending on his goals, that $250 might not even be enough for a receiver. Read through my previous posts on this thread - unlike home systems where you can have a decent speaker and t-amp and then maybe an old iPod for that $250, a car is much more complicated. For one, you're sitting off-center, unless you have a McLaren F1 (in which case I don't think you'd get stuck in traffic using it on a daily basis to bother with a sound system); second, the tweeters and midwoofer aren't mounted close together in a purpose-built MDF enclosure with a tuned port.

 

Car speakers will work fine, and as I've previously posted, it is highly preferable you spend the extra cash on car audio drivers over cheaper home audio raw drivers for a variety of reasons. For starters, they have relatively shallower basket depth and smaller magnets for mounting in doors, since home audio speakers are designed for a custom enclosure, they don't really worry about this; also car speakers are designed for essentially free-air mounting (since your doors have some space between the rubber and the window glass).

 

However, the $250 is just about the price of entry-level speaker systems and an amplifier from the same series from most brands. You can get better performance at around that price from, say, Swans; however you aren't going to get quality speakers any cheaper. There's always the raw driver option, but you'd have to DIY, otherwise your professional custom installation costs would probably go through the roof.

 

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However, if you manage your expectations well enough, you might get a good enough system for around $500. As long as you don't expect for it to sound like a home system where you can have the vocals dead center on the dash and everything else on the soundstage laid out as they would be at home, you can get a decent receiver that doesn't have the processing tools necessary (like 6-way crossover networks and time alignment that necessitates one amplifier channel for each of them, or actually just five since the last two are subwoofer outputs) for this.

 

Receiver : http://www.crutchfield.com/p_500IDA305S/Alpine-iDA-X305S.html?tp=5684

4channel amplifier : http://www.crutchfield.com/p_236RT604/MTX-Road-Thunder-RT604.html?tp=35782

Compnent speakers : http://www.crutchfield.com/p_107DXI6500/Polk-Audio-DXi6500.html?tp=106

NOTE : Confirm the right size for your car; even the mounting diameter isn't always the correct size, since mounting depth may necessitate some fabrication

Subwoofer : http://www.crutchfield.com/p_107DB840/Polk-Audio-db840.html?tp=111

 

Dynamat : http://www.crutchfield.com/p_15410425/Dynamat-Xtreme-Wedge-Pack.html?tp=2277

 

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Personally though car audio is the more frustrating audiophile project. It's exciting in so far as there's the challenge to get it to sound "right" in a car, however past all that it may be too difficult considering the costs involved. You can blow $1,000 on gear, it comes nowhere near what you have at home and that probably cost less, then it gets worse when you run into a guy who spent less than that, but did fabrication or at least installed everything properly, and it sounds a heck of a lot better because he was able to get around the inherent problems of car installs. If however you totally just don't aim for it to sound like your home system then the improvement from adding a sub or adding Dynamat along with new fron speakers might mean a lot already.

post #49 of 75
Okay, thanks, any particular speaker I should get designed for cars? I'd love to DIY the hell out of it, but it's my dads truck... frown.gif I can always put some Dynamat in it though, also, I'll probably have his truck later (And can DIY the hell out of out then)... biggrin.gif
post #50 of 75
NVM, didn't see the links... rolleyes.gif
post #51 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by gopanthersgo1 View Post

Okay, thanks, any particular speaker I should get designed for cars? I'd love to DIY the hell out of it, but it's my dads truck... frown.gif I can always put some Dynamat in it though, also, I'll probably have his truck later (And can DIY the hell out of out then)... biggrin.gif

 

Aside from those in the links, you can really go to town if you can DIY properly. BTW by "DIY" I don't mean taking off the door panels and mounting them yourself to save money for an 8-hour install by your local car audio store - I mean full-on custom installs to optimize the speakers that will probably take a few weekends off your life. Like these fiberglass enclosures:

 

1) Focal Polyglass in kickpanels - reduces time alignment issues between tweeter and midwoofer, but must be optimized to reduce localization (hence a low soundstage)

 

2) Focal K2P in custom door mounts, usually to get around the mounting depth, as well as an angle to oprimize time alignment between left and right midwoofers; also if done properly even if you mounted it on the plastic door panel it shouldn't flex (like fiberglass or at least resin the whole plastic door panel, at least on the rear side, then use more coats around the midwoofer)

 

 

3) DLS Ultimate UR6 mirange and tweeter - I wouldn't really know if that midrange install works right given what the windshield can do with the soundwaves, but dispersion patterns do vary from one driver to another. It took me a few weeks mounting my tweeters with blutack just experimenting.

 

---

 

 

Again, if you really want to see how well it can sound inside a car, I'd rather you try raw drivers from Parts Express and custom mount them, rather than get the expensive sets in the photos above then not mount them properly and you'd only feel that you wasted your cash on these things.


Edited by ProtegeManiac - 3/6/13 at 7:56pm
post #52 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProtegeManiac View Post

Aside from those in the links, you can really go to town if you can DIY properly. BTW by "DIY" I don't mean taking off the door panels and mounting them yourself to save money for an 8-hour install by your local car audio store - I mean full-on custom installs to optimize the speakers that will probably take a few weekends off your life. Like these fiberglass enclosures:

1) Focal Polyglass in kickpanels - reduces time alignment issues between tweeter and midwoofer, but must be optimized to reduce localization (hence a low soundstage)



2) Focal K2P in custom door mounts, usually to get around the mounting depth, as well as an angle to oprimize time alignment between left and right midwoofers; also if done properly even if you mounted it on the plastic door panel it shouldn't flex (like fiberglass or at least resin the whole plastic door panel, at least on the rear side, then use more coats around the midwoofer)




3) DLS Ultimate UR6 mirange and tweeter - I wouldn't really know if that midrange install works right given what the windshield can do with the soundwaves, but dispersion patterns do vary from one driver to another. It took me a few weeks mounting my tweeters with blutack just experimenting.



---


Again, if you really want to see how well it can sound inside a car, I'd rather you try raw drivers from Parts Express and custom mount them, rather than get the expensive sets in the photos above then not mount them properly and you'd only feel that you wasted your cash on these things.
Thanks for that! I'll start off with some cheap speakers from parts express... wink.gif
post #53 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by gopanthersgo1 View Post


Thanks for that! I'll start off with some cheap speakers from parts express... wink.gif

 

I suggest you mount them in the kickpanels, that way even the mounting depth and weight aren't going to be as problematic when you fabricate the enclosures. Don't expect them to pound out bass like they would at home though - free air mounting in the doors means you can cut lower but lose some impact, kickpanels mean you might get a lot of hard bass but lose a lot of extension on the bottom end of their response. Figure about one or one and a half octave higher -3db point in kickpanels vs the stated specs (which are usually measured free air). The upside is it might keep the driver from distorting, so you can play around with crossover settings when you get an amp for them. Try to get the Daytons though since they have 4ohm versions, perfect for car amps.

 

Just to add though, I totally forgot about one thing using raw drivers - crossovers. They don't come with one, and even if you get the ones that Parts Express sells and say will match the drivers of your choice, they are usually designed for mounting the midwoofer and tweeter close to each other (like in a home audio speaker). At this point your options are:

1) Use the Parts Express crossovers, but make sure to mount the tweeters not more than 5 inches away from the midwoofer, like down in the kickpanel, but angle them properly to achieve the best result. Best to experiment with both, or get the midwoofer right first, do its enclosure, then mount the tweeter temporarily just to experiment before settling on the angle you like.

 

2) Use an active crossover that can cut the proper frequencies for the tweeter (high pass 1.8khz and higher) and midwoofer (bandpass - low pass at the same frequency as the tweeter then somewhere around 100hz for the high pass). You can get one of those used analog input crossovers cheap; or get an amplifier that has a crossover with these capabilities (which are usually the more expensive amps like the DLS Ultimate series); or get a receiver that can do the same trick (or a receiver and its matched outboard digital processor). For receivers that have most necessary tuning options, try to get a used Alpine 9887 or 9855 off eBay and just use the more "ancient" iPod kits to use with these if you prefer an iPod, or get the X305S in the link above and use the matched PXA-H100 processor.

post #54 of 75
I have a 1997 Honda Civic with the stock stereo CD player system in it. I want to upgrade the speakers and deck to work the best with my iPod 5.5 gen. So far I have only read about the Polk car speakers that get great reviews on the Crutchfield website. I am open to any gear for this car. What would you put in this car?
post #55 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moab View Post

I have a 1997 Honda Civic with the stock stereo CD player system in it. I want to upgrade the speakers and deck to work the best with my iPod 5.5 gen. So far I have only read about the Polk car speakers that get great reviews on the Crutchfield website. I am open to any gear for this car. What would you put in this car?

 

If you just want a simple upgrade, I say get a receiver with the connectivity options you need (Alpines have iPod transports, sort of like the NDS-1, with no CD transports in them; most work with Android via USB nowadays). Then get a decent amp, at least an MTX Thunder (check if they're still as good as before though), that way you'll use more, and cleaner, power. I personally am biased for Focal so I'd get Focal Access off eBay or Sonic Electronix, but I wouldn't mind Polk's dB series. Also Dynamat the doors - neglect this and you might add a sub and still get that hole in the response around the upper bass. Better use Dynamat first then get a sub later, because you might be able to live with just this.

 

And at least angle the tweeters right if the most you're willing to do to your doors is maybe add an MDF spacer and Dynamat (yes, those online guides sometimes don't account for real mounting depth, like some object or other part snagging  the magnet, or its shape has one corner hitting something, etc).


Edited by ProtegeManiac - 3/10/13 at 8:04am
post #56 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProtegeManiac View Post

If you just want a simple upgrade, I say get a receiver with the connectivity options you need (Alpines have iPod transports, sort of like the NDS-1, with no CD transports in them; most work with Android via USB nowadays). Then get a decent amp, at least an MTX Thunder (check if they're still as good as before though), that way you'll use more, and cleaner, power. I personally am biased for Focal so I'd get Focal Access off eBay or Sonic Electronix, but I wouldn't mind Polk's dB series. Also Dynamat the doors - neglect this and you might add a sub and still get that hole in the response around the upper bass. Better use Dynamat first then get a sub later, because you might be able to live with just this.

And at least angle the tweeters right if the most you're willing to do to your doors is maybe add an MDF spacer and Dynamat (yes, those online guides sometimes don't account for real mounting depth, like some object or other part snagging  the magnet, or its shape has one corner hitting something, etc).

Thanks ProtegeManiac. I do like the Polk sound. I will look into the Alpine decks and an amp.
post #57 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moab View Post


Thanks ProtegeManiac. I do like the Polk sound. I will look into the Alpine decks and an amp.

 

Good luck. Also try to look up those prefabricated kickpanel speaker mounts, I think Crutchfield has them. If they can take the depth of the speakers you want, then you can experiment with the midwoofer in an angled postion to see the difference. Just make sure you play with the tweeters' mounting too.

post #58 of 75

Man you guys got some sick setups in here.. I actually got my setup for dirt cheap.. $50 for speakers/box/amp/cables (from a friend who was upgrading)

Pioneer Head Unit >> 2x 10" Kicker Comps >> MTX Audio Amp.. 

 

Nothing fancy.. really simple setup.. and it doesn't sound that bad. Easily overpowers the room in my little Rx7 cabin O_o

 

 

post #59 of 75

Currently drive a beater 99 Pontiac Sunfire that I drive when it's not nice enough to ride my motorcycle, To make driving it less terrible I threw in some old components I accumulated back in high school 

Pioneer DEH-P5000UB - has USB iPod control and 4v preamp outputs, which is all I really ask for in a basic system

cheapo Planet Audio 4x6 plate speakers in the front doors,

JVC Arsenal component 6x9's in the rear deck

a single Kenwood KFC-W3012 12" sub in ported box 

Polk MOMO c400.4 front channels powering 6x9s and the rear channels bridged powering the sub. 

 

Overall it is a decent sounding well balanced system. I used to have an extended cab Silverado with a MTX Thunderform 10" and always wanted just a little more bass but I also don't miss the systems I had back in high school, with pairs of 12s, huge amps etc... I even set up an 18" RockFord in my friends jeep once... Managed to get his rear window to come unglued. basshead.gif

post #60 of 75


2012 VW GTI
Rockford Fosgate 360.3 (processor)
125WPC to mids
125WPC to tweets
500W to sub

Aftermarket speakers in stock locations. Shallow sub under trunk liner.
D class amps.
No boosting, only cutting of frequencies. L/R sides are very close in frequency response as well.
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