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Schiit Owners Unite - Page 201

post #3001 of 12187
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheChosen0ne View Post


Thinking about getting he-500.  Also would you guys recommend the he-400 or he-500 if I can afford to buy either one?  And how much better are they than my current headphones?

 

I can't do a direct comparison but maybe this will help:

 

I've heard the DT880 vs the T1. T1 is better overall - better detail retrieval, better bass quality, and for my ears, better midrange, and smoother highs. Was able to try them side by side, and much, much preferred the T1. 

 

The HE-500 is very different - detail, balanced, natural. It is easily in the same league as the T1 as a product in terms of quality, and even better from a price to performance ratio. They are both keepers.  

 

I am not talking about them being equal in technicalities, but if you talk about "great headphones" in general based on their own individual merits, the HE500 holds its own. 

 

Go for the HE500.

post #3002 of 12187
Have the 500 had the 400 I would never go back 500 do a much more balanced sound 400 are weird with female vocals drove me crazy
500 my end game
post #3003 of 12187
Quote:
Originally Posted by ab initio View Post


I would be careful if I were you. Olor1n shared his personal experience, it doesn't mean that your tastes will match. If you look forward to getting HD-800, then you would be doing yourself a great disservice to pass just because of somebody else's subjective tastes.
 

It is unwise to take single pieces of anecdotal testimony and expect them to hold as universal truths. You'll quickly find that if you tally every single opinion on Head-Fi, that you will find that there exists no universally accepted "best" configuration.

 

Cheers!

 

EDIT/afterthought: I guess it would be helpful if you could share with us exactly what it is about your current configuration that you find lacking. That will help the community help direct you toward a solution. If you are just curious about HD800s, then it would be advisable to try them at a dealer or at a meet.


Fair enough point. I am hoping to have the HD800s to compliment my HD6t50s. I have tried the HD800 at a local meet on the Lyr and I still find them amazing. I am mostly just concerned if the HD800 will be too sibilant on the mojo/gungnir combo as I have heard the HD800 can be tough to match with amps/dacs. I do not need to find a "perfect" match for the HD800... but I would like to avoid any rough combos (ie. for me... the JJ tubes on the Lyr with any treble happy cans).

post #3004 of 12187
Quote:
Originally Posted by IorekByrnison View Post

Solid state burn-in is real, you just have to believe hard enough. You see, when you've run the chips for at least 40 hours, you begin to attract the possession of fidelity-sprites into the chassis - this is also why you should have a solid gold cording fabric-wrapped USB cable with rare metals double magnetic shielding and diamond reinforced plugs. Those aspects allow you to attract and retain more of the sprites than a normal cable would. It really is a faith thing though - if you think this sounds ridiculous, they'll be offput by that and refuse to settle into your gear, so you won't notice any benefits. If you don't believe it's because you don't believe... and if you do, let me know - I have a really nice USB cable for you, pre-populated with fidelity sprites. wink.gif

What about the nannites? You forgot the nannites!?!
post #3005 of 12187
Quote:
Originally Posted by IorekByrnison View Post

They ship burned-in amps? What does that mean for my Valhalla, then? - the tubes fully burned in, partially burned in, fresh but something else in the amp burned in, etc.
I've heard that tubes and tube amps have a definite burn-in period, so if they've already done it for me, that's pretty awesome. 

Your Valhalla has tubes, which are used to amplify a signal. There is a lovely picture of the innards of a Valhalla (without tubes) on the Schiit website.

Tubes in the Valhalla are made by some other manufacturer (their website doesn't say which one). This other manufacturer, as part of the process of creating the tubes, does a couple of interesting things when creating them. After the vacuum envelope is sealed, something called "flashing the getter" is performed, which helps clean up the gases in the tube (to get rid of oxygen). After this is done, the tube is operated for a period of time, which is variously called aging, or burn-in. This burn-in is meant to stabilize the operation of the tube, and give an indication of whether it will continue to work or if it's going to fail soon. Tubes that do not stabilize are discarded.

The aging process for a tube continues for its lifetime. The majority of the changes in a tube occur during this first operational period, after flashing the getter. Why do things change in a tube? Well, because basically any electron tube is "playing catch" with electrons inside the vacuum envelope, between the various metal structures you see inside the tube: one surface emits electrons, others absorb them. This process has a limited lifetime: there are only so many electrons that the surfaces can emit, before they simply run out. So over time, tubes get weaker and weaker, and one day they just stop working. Worn out tubes cannot be repaired, they are simply discarded (it would be more expensive to repair them than make new ones).

Anyhow, once Schiit receives the tubes for their Valhallas, they are already burned in for a short period of time. They will continue to change over the life of the device. This change is not burn-in per se; it is just the side effect of the changes inside the tube as it is used, and finally worn out.

Do other components burn in? No. At least not in the way I just described above. Do they change after you turn them on and operate them? Hopefully not much, otherwise something might break. There might be small changes as things heat up, but that's not burn-in, in the sense I've explained it above.

I worked in an industry for a while that produced tubes (which is still in business, I might add), for a different sort of application. You can look this stuff up on Google so I won't bother to explain it here. Satellites, radar, military stuff, microwave towers, commercial radio stations, all use high power vacuum tubes. Some of them are rather high tech devices, and cost a whole lot more than a NOS NIB Mullard (lol). All of those tubes experience burn-in, some of them for very long periods of time (hundreds of hours). Solid state devices do not require this burn in; they either work, or they don't.
post #3006 of 12187
Quote:
Originally Posted by Defiant00 View Post

I believe they've previously stated that they let them run for either 24 or 48 hours straight before shipping them out for burn in purposes and to catch early faults.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Defiant00 View Post

Well, all I can say is when I got the M&M I listened for maybe 15 minutes, left it playing and went and watched some TV, then came back and listened a couple hours later. Right out of the box I thought they sounded harsh, a couple hours later I thought they sounded good.

My theory is that Schiit might not burn in the M&M like they do their other amps and DACs, but it's only a guess. Either way, outside of the first couple hours I never noticed any difference.

In the first case, that's called a smoke check. 48 hours is overkill (really, so is 24 hours). They'd only really have to operate it at full blast until it got hot, for maybe a couple hours, to really see if something was going to blow. The point of a smoke check is to get a device operating as hot as it will ever run, to see if it breaks. In my experience, a device that has a flaw from manufacture doesn't require 2 days to blow - it usually blows the moment after you turn it on, lol. At most, maybe an hour. So all that extra time is really just "feel good" time biggrin.gif

The reason for this is that heat is not a friend to a solid state device. The design incorporates sufficient features to allow a device to cool enough to keep it from melting, under maximum load, for a certain period of time. This period of time is called a rating, or a duty cycle (this applies to lots of things). Some devices can only be operated for short periods of time, say for example, a paper shredder. Read the instructions carefully and you'll find out that your shredder is only rated to operate for perhaps 10 minutes out of an hour. If you operate it longer than that, you can damage it. Welders are another example: you can only keep a welder running for a certain period of time. A device that is rated for continuous duty, can be operated constantly, 24/7 (that is the highest rating).

I don't see anything on the Schiit website that specifies their gear is rated for continuous operation, but if they run their gear at full blast for 48 hours before shipping it, that's pretty much continuous duty. Realistically, no one listens to their gear that long every day ... unless you fall asleep on it lol.

In the second case, you exposed your ears to the M+M then went to watch TV, which has a completely different audio signature. In my experience, that alone will alter your perception of what another audio setup sounds like. Your TV audio isn't going to be anywhere near as sophisticated as the M+M, so sure they're going to sound better wink.gif
post #3007 of 12187
Quote:
Originally Posted by UmustBKidn View Post

<snip>

I don't see anything on the Schiit website that specifies their gear is rated for continuous operation, but if they run their gear at full blast for 48 hours before shipping it, that's pretty much continuous duty. Realistically, no one listens to their gear that long every day ... unless you fall asleep on it lol.

In the second case, you exposed your ears to the M+M then went to watch TV, which has a completely different audio signature. In my experience, that alone will alter your perception of what another audio setup sounds like. Your TV audio isn't going to be anywhere near as sophisticated as the M+M, so sure they're going to sound better wink.gif

 

While I don't, I know some people have reported that they just leave their Schiit on all the time.

 

For the second case I'll have to respectfully disagree, although I admit it's an interesting theory. My main point was just that I listened for about 15 minutes, let them burn in for a couple hours (without me listening, so it wouldn't be me getting used to the sound signature), then listened again.

post #3008 of 12187

Nevermind...


Edited by M-13 - 8/8/13 at 1:06pm
post #3009 of 12187

My Valhalla showed up.. I'm still on my HD439s as the T70 shows up in a few more hours... but

 

mother of god

i've forgotten how to type

 

how can something sound like this

 

i've heard some very, very expensive solids but never really sat down with tubes

 

holy. ****.

post #3010 of 12187

Just let your brain adjust for a bit before jumping to conclusions. Low impedance cans aren't exactly the Valhalla's strong suit. 

post #3011 of 12187

No worries there... the T70, an impedance-monster, just showed up and mother of god

 

i can't even imagine how these will sound on it burned in. wow.

 

and the soundstage, holy what the soundstage. i don't get how people can say these have no bass*, not only am I am getting plenty of bass, it's all over the soundstage in the best way

 

maybe i'll be coherent enough for a proper opinion post later but...

 

Valhalla + T70 = OMFG.

 

 

 

*as aforementioned... impedance, impedance, impedance. not a problem for the Valhalla


Edited by IorekByrnison - 8/8/13 at 4:31pm
post #3012 of 12187

Do you think there will be a chance for Schiit to make a speaker amplifier? Or is that out of their "jurisdiction" so to speak?

post #3013 of 12187
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLACKENEDPLAGUE View Post

Do you think there will be a chance for Schiit to make a speaker amplifier? Or is that out of their "jurisdiction" so to speak?

 

Check this out:

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/667711/new-schiit-ragnarok-and-yggdrasil

 

:) The Schiit Ragnarok is a speaker amp as well as a universal headphone amp. Not yet in production though they expect it to be available by close of the year. 

post #3014 of 12187

Jesus. I want those for the names alone. a DAC named Yggdrasil and an amp named Ragnarok? holy Schiit.

 

Pic time of my new setup at work... the T70 is a plenty fine bass-monster, you just need to feed it tubes (and the spirits of fallen warriors)... the key to unlocking the bass: even though it's a high efficiency Tesla driver, that efficiency does not apply to the nearly 800 ohm bass. Run it on an iPhone or low-impedance oriented amp and yes, the Tesla magic will get you volume in the mids and highs despite it being a 250-rated set, but no, it won't do bass. Get something that can blast through the bass impedance and you're in business (the Valhalla).

 

Probably thanks to the tubes, I also don't see anything of people's complaints of stabbing highs from the spike at 10k, just pure, un-painful crystalline clarity. The T70 and Valhalla together... a massive, massive soundstage, bass resonating throughout, detail enough to hear every little scrape and breath from the musicians, with solid warmth through the mids unlike anything I've ever heard. I used to be a Sennheiser loyalist, but then this happened. These are better than the pricepoint opens I've heard. I never thought I'd say this, but the T70+Valhalla absolutely walks all over the HD650. I still love Sennheiser to death but, sorry 650...

 

The T70 gets too much hate. Valhalla it, people.

 


Edited by IorekByrnison - 8/11/13 at 4:10pm
post #3015 of 12187
Quote:
Originally Posted by IorekByrnison View Post


Pic time of my new setup at work...

^ This

:: Drool ::

/cry
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