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post #16 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayleighSilvers View Post

Thanks a lot for the response everyone. I've learned a lot. Guess I should've asked this question before I started buying stuff but it's better late than never. I was oblivious to this loudness war going on, and didn't know anything about bad mastering. I used to listen to music on my turtlebeach x1's and fake sony mdr-ex700 from ebay. Back then I really enjoyed my music. But ever since I found this site I haven't because I was trying to analyse everything too much and it ended up just listening to the headphones rather than the music. That said I can't go back to my old headphones. They do sound terrible compared to what I have now. 

 

Maybe in the future I might give this hobby a proper go, but for my current musical tastes it would probably be better to grab a cheap pair of fun phones and be done with it. I know my wallet would thank me for it biggrin.gif.

 

I'm thinking of trying a pair of monitor phones just to make sure there isn't anything else I'm missing from my music. Will the FA0-11/DT 700's be good enough or should I get something more accurate like the shure 940's? I don't really plan on keeping them, unless they really do impress.

 

 


Heya,

 

I would absolutely suggest starting with a DT770, it does most everything very good justice for it's cost.

 

Very best,

 

post #17 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vinc View Post

Hi,

I think that when you buy a pair of good headphones, it is because you want good music production; you want it to sound real, like in a concert. When you listen to pop music, there is not as much improvement as in jazz or rock because it is not always decently mastered and there's alot of auto-tune, which can really scrap the "blow-away" feeling. Imo, pop music or rap is often more bass centric than other genre, so it is normal that you might not be blow away by them of a heaphones set up which cannot give you the physical impact of a speakers system. Have you tried headphones that delievered decent bass?

 

The other question that I would like to ask you is how much do you like music and for how much time have you been regularly listening to music? The thing that blew me away with good headphones is fact of how much I felt I was missing listening to my old cans, rediscovering music and having some memories brought back to me.

 

By the way, it it not because you listen to pop that you can't appreciate Hi-fi! It should soung better, maybe you haven't tried the good cans yet. I would go to a local store and test some headphones to see if you get that feeling you are looking for.

 

Oh, another thing. If you still have a pair of cheaper headphones, try some of your favorite songs on them and then retry them on your best headphones, you should notice a big difference. I always felt that when you downgrade you get a much better idea how much better are your headphones than when you upgrade.

 

Hope that it will help and happy listening!
 



 

The problem with pop music, and this is me talking from a noob view, is that it is recorded in a controlled environment. Unlike rock, jazz and all the other genre's I mentioned where the artists play the whole song and instruments live and record it, I feel pop and similar genres are recorded in a different way. For example, when I listen to the same songs sung live, the voices sound much more natural, which they would do. I'm guessing that when recording songs to CD, they do in a controlled room and use a computer to remove any "imperfections". This is my understanding of it, which is why a higher end phone will probably be useless for me since they have purposely removed these details which they thought to be a detriment to the music.

 

Of course this is just my theory. I don't understand anything about recording to call it a fact, but I can definitely tell whether a song is recorded live or in a different way.
 

edit* I did get a chance to go to a 2 stores yesterday. One was HMV where they had the denon D2000, D1100, and the ws55. I only sampled them so didn't get to give them a full evaluation, but out of the three, only the ws55 impressed me. The had the best bass, which felt really nice, moved  lot of air, but also vocals seemed to have that sparkle that I've been looking for. Now maybe I was mistaken, I'm going to go back to make sure I did like what I had heard. The shop was really noisy, and all the phones were connected to some unknown amp, so it might be a bit unfair to evaluate what I had heard.

 

Another shop I went to was a dedicated audio shop, which was much more quiet. After hearing the ws55, I asked them to let me audition the Ath-a500, a700x, and the m50. I have to say, the Art, and air series have the dumbest design I have ever seen. I love the Japanese, but they infuriate me at times. I have a small head, so the headphones kept slipping off because of their useless 3D wing system. Soundwise none of them really blew me away. I had brought my HTF600's as well to compare, but I didn't feel like I picked up any extra detail. I didn't really spend that long with them, and my ears aren't well trained. 


Edited by RayleighSilvers - 3/13/12 at 10:40am
post #18 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MalVeauX View Post


Heya,

 

I would absolutely suggest starting with a DT770, it does most everything very good justice for it's cost.

 

Very best,

 



Since you have the HTF600's as well, do the dt770's pick up more detail than the panny's? DT700 was the first phone I was going to buy, but all the talk of recessed mids (i.e vocals) put me off. I'm looking for sparkly vocals + bass.

 

Tbh, I was psyched up when I read all the hype for the HTF600's, but when I got them I wasn't as impressed as everyone else. They went past the 100 hour burn in mark last week, so I don't think it's because of that, but something seems to have happened today. Whether it's because I'm in a good mood or something, but the Panny's sound very very good today. I'm enjoying them a lot. My soundmagic still sound boring, but the HTF have really come alive. Watched an episode of the mentalist, and listened to some songs and I've enjoyed the sound thoroughly.  

post #19 of 43
fun fact: anything with the word ''audiophile'' in it means coloration of some sort. audiophile gear always tend to bend the audio signal for audio pleasure.

in reality if the headphone was absolutely transparent and the gear it would be the perfect ''all-rounder'' and do every single genre flawlessly. i just suggest get the best headphones you can afford and worry about everything else later. you can still listen to and enjoy music even if it's recorded so-so or not every good. it's about the music after all.
post #20 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayleighSilvers View Post



Since you have the HTF600's as well, do the dt770's pick up more detail than the panny's? DT700 was the first phone I was going to buy, but all the talk of recessed mids (i.e vocals) put me off. I'm looking for sparkly vocals + bass.

 

Tbh, I was psyched up when I read all the hype for the HTF600's, but when I got them I wasn't as impressed as everyone else. They went past the 100 hour burn in mark last week, so I don't think it's because of that, but something seems to have happened today. Whether it's because I'm in a good mood or something, but the Panny's sound very very good today. I'm enjoying them a lot. My soundmagic still sound boring, but the HTF have really come alive. Watched an episode of the mentalist, and listened to some songs and I've enjoyed the sound thoroughly.  


If I were you, I would try to find a local store near and try different headphone pair. It's pretty difficult to know what you would like you don't test it, especially that sparkly vocal or well defined bass for us might not be the same thing for you.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by RayleighSilvers View Post

The problem with pop music, and this is me talking from a noob view, is that it is recorded in a controlled environment. Unlike rock, jazz and all the other genre's I mentioned where the artists play the whole song and instruments live and record it, I feel pop and similar genres are recorded in a different way. For example, when I listen to the same songs sung live, the voices sound much more natural, which they would do. I'm guessing that when recording songs to CD, they do in a controlled room and use a computer to remove any "imperfections". This is my understanding of it, which is why a higher end phone will probably be useless for me since they have purposely removed these details which they thought to be a detriment to the music.

 

Of course this is just my theory. I don't understand anything about recording to call it a fact, but I can definitely tell whether a song is recorded live or in a different way.
 

 


Well, rock and jazz are most of the times going to have a better reproduction of voices because they are not that much modfied. And they will have a bigger soundstage and sound more natural because... it is more natural!

However, you can totally find good recordings of pop that will sound REALLY good and this is why I asked how much you like music. You don't always want to listen analytically especially if you want the blow away feeling and you are listening to pop.

 

Here are some songs that are electronics  that I find well recorded and sounds good to me on speakers/headphones. I would suggest you to buy them or listen then to a streaming radio having a better quality than youtube.

 

Zero 7 - Mr. McGee  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NbHw4sT3kGQ

Yonderboi - Milonga Del Mar http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2nDZNF5gME0

Tosca - Orozsco http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1__QCyy9CgQ

Booka Shade - Darko http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yls2DCeMbKM

Outkast- Decatur Psalm - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGuK1x6THiY

Gorillaz - Glitter Freeze http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f5JDqGNXxCU&feature=fvst

Sade - Soldier of Love http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IR5_rTCi-Bo

 

Let me know what you think and what they sound like

 

 

post #21 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayleighSilvers View Post

The problem with pop music, and this is me talking from a noob view, is that it is recorded in a controlled environment. Unlike rock, jazz and all the other genre's I mentioned where the artists play the whole song and instruments live and record it, I feel pop and similar genres are recorded in a different way. For example, when I listen to the same songs sung live, the voices sound much more natural, which they would do. I'm guessing that when recording songs to CD, they do in a controlled room and use a computer to remove any "imperfections". This is my understanding of it, which is why a higher end phone will probably be useless for me since they have purposely removed these details which they thought to be a detriment to the music.

 

Of course this is just my theory. I don't understand anything about recording to call it a fact, but I can definitely tell whether a song is recorded live or in a different way.
 

edit* I did get a chance to go to a 2 stores yesterday. One was HMV where they had the denon D2000, D1100, and the ws55. I only sampled them so didn't get to give them a full evaluation, but out of the three, only the ws55 impressed me. The had the best bass, which felt really nice, moved  lot of air, but also vocals seemed to have that sparkle that I've been looking for. Now maybe I was mistaken, I'm going to go back to make sure I did like what I had heard. The shop was really noisy, and all the phones were connected to some unknown amp, so it might be a bit unfair to evaluate what I had heard.

 

Another shop I went to was a dedicated audio shop, which was much more quiet. After hearing the ws55, I asked them to let me audition the Ath-a500, a700x, and the m50. I have to say, the Art, and air series have the dumbest design I have ever seen. I love the Japanese, but they infuriate me at times. I have a small head, so the headphones kept slipping off because of their useless 3D wing system. Soundwise none of them really blew me away. I had brought my HTF600's as well to compare, but I didn't feel like I picked up any extra detail. I didn't really spend that long with them, and my ears aren't well trained. 


You've got it right about multitrack studio recordings, though multitrack studio recordings aren't at all absent in other genres including classical (soloists) and jazz.   But it's much more sanitized in pop, and more modified.  As you say, each track is manipulated and adjusted, and in many cases, depending on the pop genre, the singer's voice is altered to not suck quite as much.  And lets not forget auto-tune!   In true, true pop the truth is that most of the performers aren't selected for their singing finesse but by their appearance and marketability.  Their voice can always be fixed digitally, their "star power" can't. 

 

For other pop from better musicians who just happen to fall into the pop category, it's just a matter of the studio trying to make the record "flawless" and "better than life".  Plus appeasing the management with making it "louder" than the competition and pleasing the bulk of CD/MP3 buyers buy making it sound "at its best" on trash speakers with compression and EQ-ing.

 

Audio Technica....yeah, their headband design is absolutely love-hate. My ATH-AD700 are probably the most comfortable headphones I own.  Feather light and zero pressure on my head.  But if I move my head they'll go sliding.  I have a wide enough head that it's not a problem but with a smaller head it would be terrible.  I've seen you can bend the headband inward a little (though be careful, the band is the signal wire for the left driver) to make it better.   My K702 & HD650s won't budge by comparison, but the clamping force makes me have to keep moving them every 20 min or so else the throbbing in my temples will win over the music due to their vice grip clamping force.   Also the purple earcups on my 700's take some getting used to, though it's quintessentially Japanese.  All it needs is a panda face painted on it....or Pikachu.  The Japanese love painting Pikachu on everything from trains to planes...why not headphones? smily_headphones1.gif

 

The part I don't understand is how they're designed for such huge heads.  Most Japanese people have modest-to-small facial features.  AT cans are seemingly designed for the Japanese national Sumo federation....
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vinc View Post


Here are some songs that are electronics  that I find well recorded and sounds good to me on speakers/headphones. I would suggest you to buy them or listen then to a streaming radio having a better quality than youtube.

 

Zero 7 - Mr. McGee  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NbHw4sT3kGQ

Yonderboi - Milonga Del Mar http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2nDZNF5gME0

Tosca - Orozsco http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1__QCyy9CgQ

Booka Shade - Darko http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yls2DCeMbKM

Outkast- Decatur Psalm - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGuK1x6THiY

Gorillaz - Glitter Freeze http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f5JDqGNXxCU&feature=fvst

Sade - Soldier of Love http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IR5_rTCi-Bo

 

Let me know what you think and what they sound like

 

 


I consider Zero 7 type electronica/downbeat/chill to be a suitable audiophile genre with mostly excellent engineering (considering the music itself is engineering/mixing.) There are few failures of recording in that genre, so it's not really a measurement of pop prowess.

 

And Sade is really jazz.  Smooth Jazz, maybe, even pop-ish jazz, but still a product of 80's/90's popular jazz and is also exempt from the "pop" category outright.

 

Also, something is very, very wrong with the world.  I went to Head-Fi and found people who claim to be audiophiles talking about music.  Can you imagine?  Audiophiles talking about music instead of equipment?  Some days you just wonder why the world exists.... tongue.gif

 

post #22 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayleighSilvers View Post



Since you have the HTF600's as well, do the dt770's pick up more detail than the panny's? DT700 was the first phone I was going to buy, but all the talk of recessed mids (i.e vocals) put me off. I'm looking for sparkly vocals + bass.

 

Tbh, I was psyched up when I read all the hype for the HTF600's, but when I got them I wasn't as impressed as everyone else. They went past the 100 hour burn in mark last week, so I don't think it's because of that, but something seems to have happened today. Whether it's because I'm in a good mood or something, but the Panny's sound very very good today. I'm enjoying them a lot. My soundmagic still sound boring, but the HTF have really come alive. Watched an episode of the mentalist, and listened to some songs and I've enjoyed the sound thoroughly.  


Heya,

 

Yes, the DT770's are more resolving. The recessed mids talk is way over-emphasized. The headphone is not that recessed. It's mainly people looking at frequency response graphs and not actually listening to the headphone in question. Typical head-fi stuff. I listen to it and vocals and instruments don't sound all recessed to me. Some may hear a slight recession, but it's not night & day troughs like some would love to type and have you think (which have already gotten to you obviously, and unfortunately). The HTF600 is a great headphone for $30. Again, it's $30. Don't expect the world. The DT770 is better, it's higher resolving, better overall quality, and an excellent under-rated headphone.

 

Very best,

 

post #23 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayleighSilvers View Post

Because of the way these people are mastering their songs, would it be pointless to get an "audiophile" headphone?

Generally, I would say yes. It depends on what you want out of your system. If you want to hear every single detail even if said details are not flattering to the recording, then a resolving system is the way to go. If you want to make the music as involving as possible, then you're probably better off with a more colored headphone or a more colored signal path in general.

Here I have to sidetrack and say that jazz and vocal music gets used so much in reviews not because it works best with high-end equipment, but because it sounds good on everything. At the risk of sounding like a conspiracy theorist, I have to say that a lot of professional reviews - most professional reviews in fact - seem to me almost carefully formulated to divulge as little information about what's being reviewed as possible. Nearly all are in the format of "I listened to track X and this is what I heard," which is completely meaningless to anyone that hasn't heard track X. More, smooth jazz and light vocal music are so undemanding on a transducer that they will sound great on anything that's not totally terrible, so you can easily say exactly what you hear and still not publish a damning review. Obviously if you do publish a damning review you're not going to get more products sent in for review, so there's quite a bit of pressure on reviewers to not give critical reviews ever. Also notice how there rarely are any comparisons to directly competing products; most comparisons are against either cheaper products and are along the lines of "the improvements are subtle but clearly audible" or against something more expensive and are in the vein of "this gets very close for a fraction of the price."

Now, I digress, but the point of the rant above is that you shouldn't put too much stock in professional reviews, and in professional reviewers mostly using mellow jazz and other "audiophile" music. Pay attention to impressions from people that listen to the same thing that you do, and also know what they're talking about.

However, dynamic compression and hot mastering are a different thing entirely, and here anything with a modicum of resolution is going to give you exactly the amount of clipping that's there in the recording, and can be unlistenable.

So... if your collection is overcompressed, then don't go crazy with the resolution. But if your collection is simply badly produced pop/rap/whatever that isn't overcompressed, then a high-rez system may not be a total waste.

There's another way - you can combine a relatively resolving transducer with a tubey, mushy sounding amp, which will still give you a fair bit of resolution but will also inject a lot of warmth and color into the sound. This will not make overcompressed recordings passable in most circumstances but will make a lot of dry, dull-sounding recordings come to life.

I've been using nothing but Stax for I don't know how many years, and my listening lately mainly consists of psychedelic electronica, the more extreme forms of metal, some psychedelic rock, and the occasional full-scale orchestral piece (Stravinsky and Rachmaninoff for example). There you generally don't have hot mastering but recording quality can be all over the place. I often use the Omega 2 with a transformer box and a very mushy-sounding tube amp, which gives it a fairly colored but quite musical presentation, especially with recordings that are far from ideal - but at the same time you do keep a lot of the resolution and intrinsic qualities of the O2. It's nowhere as good with well-recorded music as the Blue Hawaii with the same O2 but it does make more recordings palatable.

Now, as to whether in your situation something like that is worth the money... I don't know. I don't know what you listen to. But a nice syrupy tube amp with a good, resolving dynamic like the HD600 may not be a bad way to go. Buy used and sell it if you don't like it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MalVeauX View Post

Heya,

The recessed mids talk is way over-emphasized. The headphone is not that recessed. It's mainly people looking at frequency response graphs and not actually listening to the headphone in question. Typical head-fi stuff. I listen to it and vocals and instruments don't sound all recessed to me. Some may hear a slight recession, but it's not night & day troughs like some would love to type and have you think (which have already gotten to you obviously, and unfortunately). The HTF600 is a great headphone for $30. Again, it's $30. Don't expect the world. The DT770 is better, it's higher resolving, better overall quality, and an excellent under-rated headphone.

Very best,

I've had a DT770 for years, still do actually though I don't really use it anymore. I think the mids are recessed but not to an extreme. It's only evident in comparison to something more linear like the HD600. The DT770 was never a terribly accurate headphone but so much of the new stuff on the market is seriously inaccurate that the DT770 is starting to sound like a neutral headphone in comparison. I agree that it's underrated, especially now. It's a good answer to the generic "want bass and clarity" suggestion, especially when you consider that most things that pretend to offer that give you muddy lows and screechy highs with nothing in between. The 770's mids are pretty good tonally, and it does have surprisingly good resolution.
Edited by catscratch - 3/13/12 at 3:40pm
post #24 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MalVeauX View Post


Heya,

 

Yes, the DT770's are more resolving. The recessed mids talk is way over-emphasized. The headphone is not that recessed. It's mainly people looking at frequency response graphs and not actually listening to the headphone in question. Typical head-fi stuff. I listen to it and vocals and instruments don't sound all recessed to me. Some may hear a slight recession, but it's not night & day troughs like some would love to type and have you think (which have already gotten to you obviously, and unfortunately). The HTF600 is a great headphone for $30. Again, it's $30. Don't expect the world. The DT770 is better, it's higher resolving, better overall quality, and an excellent under-rated headphone.

 

Very best,

 

 

That's good to hear. Does bother me that things are blown out of proportion on this forum, but hey, that's the internet for you. So you'd definitely recommend the 770's for me? I plan on using these for music, gaming and movies. I've seen you recommend the FA-011's to others as well. Would you mind giving the differences between the 770, 011's, and the dt990's. They all have great bass which I am looking for, but the extra thing is sparkling vocals and big but engaging soundstage. 
 

 

post #25 of 43
Thread Starter 

@catscratch

 

All my files are 320kbps, so I don't know if they are still compressed. There are some songs that I can blatently tell are mastered poorly. One of them for example, halfway through the song the balance shifts from centre to the left for about a minute, and then shifts back to the centre. I really want to slap whoever mixed that song because what would have been an epic track, turned into a very fatiguing and totally ruined one. 

post #26 of 43
That's not the same compression. I'm talking about excessive dynamic range compression during mastering, not using lossy file formats.

You'll be fine with 320k until you get into real high-end territory. When you get whatever you choose to get, do some basic testing for yourself and see if you can hear the difference between 320k and lossless.
post #27 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayleighSilvers View Post

Almost nobody every mentions mainstream music. Pop, rap, RnB. There are a few threads floating around, but I've yet to read a review that deals with those genres. I've read something about this loudness war going on at the moment. About how recording studios are compressing their songs lazily, and how they are boosting the treble and bass. Because of the way these people are mastering their songs, would it be pointless to get an "audiophile" headphone?


Have you tried any of the Grado line? They're consistently rated as great for rock, rap, etc.

 

This loudness database is really worth checking.

 

http://www.dr.loudness-war.info/

 

Lots of "new" masters are much worse than CDs produced in the 80s. The worst offender is that Metallica album where the Guitar Hero audio was better than the official release.

 

post #28 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayleighSilvers View Post

 

That's good to hear. Does bother me that things are blown out of proportion on this forum, but hey, that's the internet for you. So you'd definitely recommend the 770's for me? I plan on using these for music, gaming and movies. I've seen you recommend the FA-011's to others as well. Would you mind giving the differences between the 770, 011's, and the dt990's. They all have great bass which I am looking for, but the extra thing is sparkling vocals and big but engaging soundstage. 
 

 


The FA011 has a little more sound stage than the DT770, is less bassy, and to me, brighter. The FA011 is very bright to me, the DT770 is only a little bright. The DT990 is also bassy, much like the DT770, and also bright, about as bright, maybe a touch brighter. Ultimately the FA011 is a very similar headphone to the DT990, and the DT990 is basically an open version of the DT770. Of them all, I ultimately prefer the DT770 because I favor isolation, and find it to be a touch more tame than the DT990. The DT990 has more sound stage, and has more mid-bass, and better quality bass, than the FA011. Both Beyers are more comfortable than the FA011 to me too, bigger, deeper cups. The DT990 is a fantastic headphone, as is the DT770. If you want some isolation, DT770 is the way to go. If you want sound stage and a little more airy presentation, the DT990 would fit the bill. Ultimately, I'm more a fan of the DT770 because I like isolation (not hearing house noise, etc). I also find I can listen at lower volumes in closed headphones (again, due to isolation).

 

Very best,

post #29 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by gkanai View Post


Have you tried any of the Grado line? They're consistently rated as great for rock, rap, etc.

 


He said that he listens to rap, rb&b and pop and he sould definitely not go into the grados line. Grados are really good for metal and rock, good for instrumental music and are underperforming for electronic music. It will just sound wrong compared with their competition for the same price for that kind of music.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by catscratch View Post


Generally, I would say yes. It depends on what you want out of your system. If you want to hear every single detail even if said details are not flattering to the recording, then a resolving system is the way to go. If you want to make the music as involving as possible, then you're probably better off with a more colored headphone or a more colored signal path in general.
Here I have to sidetrack and say that jazz and vocal music gets used so much in reviews not because it works best with high-end equipment, but because it sounds good on everything. At the risk of sounding like a conspiracy theorist, I have to say that a lot of professional reviews - most professional reviews in fact - seem to me almost carefully formulated to divulge as little information about what's being reviewed as possible. Nearly all are in the format of "I listened to track X and this is what I heard," which is completely meaningless to anyone that hasn't heard track X. More, smooth jazz and light vocal music are so undemanding on a transducer that they will sound great on anything that's not totally terrible, so you can easily say exactly what you hear and still not publish a damning review. Obviously if you do publish a damning review you're not going to get more products sent in for review, so there's quite a bit of pressure on reviewers to not give critical reviews ever. Also notice how there rarely are any comparisons to directly competing products; most comparisons are against either cheaper products and are along the lines of "the improvements are subtle but clearly audible" or against something more expensive and are in the vein of "this gets very close for a fraction of the price."


You're totally right. When you are in this hobby you have to ask yourself if you are because you want to hear every little single detail and want it perfectly how it was recorded or you want something that is the more fun to listen to. If the OP wants to be in for the details, he isn't probably listening to the best genre of music for this. Usually, people who are into the analytical part of the hobbies listen to classical and jazz, because it is, IMO, what make you hear the biggest improvements in analitycal cans.

If he is more in for the "feeling" that music give him, he should probably try different colored headphones and see what he likes most, it's pretty hard to give recommendations to the OP considering that we can't know what kind of sound he likes.

 

However, I don't agree on the part that jazz sounds good on everything. A good jazz recording is pretty hard to make it sounds right; to hear all the layers, have a good soundstage, for the instrument to sound right, etc. 

 

By the way, OP, it is not because you listen to a certain genre that you should not go into hi-fi, even if you listen to bad recorded music. Sure, it will not make that much of an improvement versus good recorded music when upgrading, but you shall still be able to appreciate the sound and improvements. You just have, in my opinion, to find cans that are more forgiving and less analytical!

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by IEMCrazy View Post

 

I consider Zero 7 type electronica/downbeat/chill to be a suitable audiophile genre with mostly excellent engineering (considering the music itself is engineering/mixing.) There are few failures of recording in that genre, so it's not really a measurement of pop prowess.

 

And Sade is really jazz.  Smooth Jazz, maybe, even pop-ish jazz, but still a product of 80's/90's popular jazz and is also exempt from the "pop" category outright.

I know that most of what I posted is electronica / trip hop and not really pop or r&b, but I shared it to "demonstrate" that you do not need to listen  to accoustical music to have a blown away feeling. Electronic music can sound pretty down good.

OP, you could listen to most of the Madonna albums, they're pretty well mastered.
 

 

post #30 of 43

Generally expensive headphones have a natural flavor unsuited for R&B, Soul and Rap.  I've not really experienced any expensive headphone that truly excelled at these genres, typical you'd want a warm experience.  The LCD2/3, Hifiman He-500/6, Stax, and similar sets are really dry, tonally clean, monitorish depending on the brand.  When someone designs a really warm and fun experience in the hifi world, I will be first in line.  

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