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post #601 of 1019
Quote:
Originally Posted by extrabigmehdi View Post

If the amperior really fixed resonance problems, I think people would have reported improved soundstage.


Doesn't the closed design and small driver inherently limit the soundstage?

post #602 of 1019
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craigster75 View Post


Doesn't the closed design and small driver inherently limit the soundstage?


I don't know, I'm currently using iem , very small, with micro drivers, and incredible soundstage (yamaha eph-100). If they manage to get a big soundstage from something that small, then why not the amperiors.

post #603 of 1019
Quote:
Originally Posted by extrabigmehdi View Post

If the amperior really fixed resonance problems, I think people would have reported improved soundstage.

 

I didn't say resonance was completely fixed, just improved. I don't know if its even possible to completely solve resonance issues in a closed headphone. And improving resonance doesn't directly correlate to an improved soundstage, just better accuracy and less distortion etc.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Craigster75 View Post


Doesn't the closed design and small driver inherently limit the soundstage?

 

I don't have a lot of headphones to base this on but yes, of the ones I've tried, the on-ear phones have always had a smaller soundstage compared to my circumaural phones.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by extrabigmehdi View Post


I don't know, I'm currently using iem , very small, with micro drivers, and incredible soundstage (yamaha eph-100). If they manage to get a big soundstage from something that small, then why not the amperiors.

 

Again, the Amperior is based on the HD25 and designed to sound identical but with improved cups and higher sensitivity for plugging directly into mobile devices. IIRC, the HD25 has always been considered to have a small soundstage, along with many other on-ear portable headphones. Don't expect this to be improved on the Amperior.


Edited by devhen - 7/6/12 at 4:48pm
post #604 of 1019

Just picked up a silver pair from Apple Store in Glasgow.  I originally planned on trying the P3 with a view to getting a pair of portable cans for casual listening on the go.  The P3 seemed to fit the bill until I realised how unsatifactory they sounded, and for that matter, the P5 were also underwhelming.  The latter pair were much better sounding than the P3 - more refined and tonally accurate, though still not the level of fidelity I wanted.  The sound signature is easy on the ear, but clearly not for the 'audiophile' - whatever that means nowadays.  So what did I do instead?  Buy a pair of these... blind.  I haven't heard the HD25s before so I didn't know what to expect either.  48 hours of "burn-in" later, I'm glad to find myself rather satisfied with my purchase.  It's been a while since I posted impressions so excuse the disorganised nature of this post - I'm typing what comes first to mind :P

 

The Amperior is for the most part a pretty accurate pair of headphones.  It gets the timbre of instruments largely spot on... The upper mids though are prominent, which is in itself not an issue unless of course they sound grainy, which they are.  It lacks warmth and at times comes across as quite thin.  This is particularly evident in the violin sections of orchestral recordings.  Maybe it is the fit of the headphone?  Well I have tried all manner of repositioning, pressure over the earcups to improve the seal etc to no avail. Thankfully my listening has diversified these days and I don't listening solely to classical symphonic genres.  Having said all that, the slight thinness at the upper midrange actually makes certain solo violin recording (solo works and concertos) sound pretty exciting.  There's a nice bite and raspness, just like in real life.  Listening to those double stops at near the beginning of Brahm's violin concerto is an absolute joy.

 

Now slightly lower down in the frequency range, the mid/mid-lower range where the bassoons and cellos reside, the Amperior is an absolute delight.  With a well-recorded track, there's a good amount of detail here and a weightiness to it.  There's not much wrong here.  Sadly, the bass and sub-bass may dominate a little too much for classical, often bleeding into the upper ranges.  It's reasonably well-controlled, just not as well as say a higher-end pair of cans might handle lower notes.  This is by no means a deal-killer as thankfully the degree of "bleeding" is only moderate and certainly bearable, at least for me it is.  For other genres like rock, pop, RnB, the bass is sufficient in volume, but maybe not in visceral punch.  

 

All in all, there is pretty decent bass extension, and a meaty bass too.  Tonally there's a good balance of bass/mids/highs with a general emphasis on the lower ranges.  The highs aren't sibilant at all and there's just enough shimmer to make the high hats sparkle.

 

The soundstaging is not spectacular.  Passable.  There is a sense of space and reasonably airy, which also describes the overall presentation.  It's not in-your-face like a pair of low-midrange Grados.  I can also make out where instruments come from, but again, the imaging is perhaps not pin-sharp like a pair of good electrostats.  The attack is in general well defined.  Sharp... ish.  Decay believable and realistic.  For its price range these are all very positive points.

 

From an ergonomics point of view, these cans are comfortable to wear, although I'm not sure how they'd fare on an 11 hour transatlantic flight.  The clamp on the head, whilst not offensive for an hour or two, may prove too much.  Isolation is good, too.  The build quality is solid.  It's a little strange to see such high quality machined metal cups juxtaposed by seemingly cheap plastiky parts, but whatever; the plastic bits look well made.  The one thing I'm not happy with is the flimsy interchangeable cable (the bottom half).  I'll certainly be replacing that with something more durable for use at home.  The one with the controls will remain for use on-the-go.

 

Anyway.  That's all I have time for at the moment.  The Amperiors are here to stay and I'm glad I didn't spend the same amount of money on the P5s, while more luxuriously fashioned, have a totally unremarkable sound.  Hope this helps any potential buyers who are still sitting on the fence.


Edited by milkpowder - 7/6/12 at 5:22pm
post #605 of 1019
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkpowder View Post

Just picked up a silver pair from Apple Store in Glasgow.  I originally planned on trying the P3 with a view to getting a pair of portable cans for casual listening on the go.  The P3 seemed to fit the bill until I realised how unsatifactory they sounded, and for that matter, the P5 were also underwhelming.  The latter pair were much better sounding than the P3 - more refined and tonally accurate, though still not the level of fidelity I wanted.  The sound signature is easy on the ear, but clearly not for the 'audiophile' - whatever that means nowadays.  So what did I do instead?  Buy a pair of these... blind.  I haven't heard the HD25s before so I didn't know what to expect either.  48 hours of "burn-in" later, I'm glad to find myself rather satisfied with my purchase.  It's been a while since I posted impressions so excuse the disorganised nature of this post - I'm typing what comes first to mind :P

 

The Amperior is for the most part a pretty accurate pair of headphones.  It gets the timbre of instruments largely spot on... The upper mids though are prominent, which is in itself not an issue unless of course they sound grainy, which they are.  It lacks warmth and at times comes across as quite thin.  This is particularly evident in the violin sections of orchestral recordings.  Maybe it is the fit of the headphone?  Well I have tried all manner of repositioning, pressure over the earcups to improve the seal etc to no avail. Thankfully my listening has diversified these days and I don't listening solely to classical symphonic genres.  Having said all that, the slight thinness at the upper midrange actually makes certain solo violin recording (solo works and concertos) sound pretty exciting.  There's a nice bite and raspness, just like in real life.  Listening to those double stops at near the beginning of Brahm's violin concerto is an absolute joy.

 

Now slightly lower down in the frequency range, the mid/mid-lower range where the bassoons and cellos reside, the Amperior is an absolute delight.  With a well-recorded track, there's a good amount of detail here and a weightiness to it.  There's not much wrong here.  Sadly, the bass and sub-bass may dominate a little too much for classical, often bleeding into the upper ranges.  It's reasonably well-controlled, just not as well as say a higher-end pair of cans might handle lower notes.  This is by no means a deal-killer as thankfully the degree of "bleeding" is only moderate and certainly bearable, at least for me it is.  For other genres like rock, pop, RnB, the bass is sufficient in volume, but maybe not in visceral punch.  

 

All in all, there is pretty decent bass extension, and a meaty bass too.  Tonally there's a good balance of bass/mids/highs with a general emphasis on the lower ranges.  The highs aren't sibilant at all and there's just enough shimmer to make the high hats sparkle.

 

The soundstaging is not spectacular.  Passable.  There is a sense of space and reasonably airy, which also describes the overall presentation.  It's not in-your-face like a pair of low-midrange Grados.  I can also make out where instruments come from, but again, the imaging is perhaps not pin-sharp like a pair of good electrostats.  The attack is in general well defined.  Sharp... ish.  Decay believable and realistic.  For its price range these are all very positive points.

 

From an ergonomics point of view, these cans are comfortable to wear, although I'm not sure how they'd fare on an 11 hour transatlantic flight.  The clamp on the head, whilst not offensive for an hour or two, may prove too much.  Isolation is good, too.  The build quality is solid.  It's a little strange to see such high quality machined metal cups juxtaposed by seemingly cheap plastiky parts, but whatever; the plastic bits look well made.  The one thing I'm not happy with is the flimsy interchangeable cable (the bottom half).  I'll certainly be replacing that with something more durable for use at home.  The one with the controls will remain for use on-the-go.

 

Anyway.  That's all I have time for at the moment.  The Amperiors are here to stay and I'm glad I didn't spend the same amount of money on the P5s, while more luxuriously fashioned, have a totally unremarkable sound.  Hope this helps any potential buyers who are still sitting on the fence.


I went to the Apple store specifically to get the Amperior, but to my surprise, they displayed a good 20-30 different headphones, except the Amperior. The employee had no clue about the headphone until I ask them to check the back, and he was able to dig up a pair for me. While he was grabbing the headphones, I stood around listening to the P5, and just like Milkpowder said, it sounded very underwhelming, unlike HD25-1 II.

Once I got the Amperior, I used it on my phone to test, and immediately noticed that the bass feels slightly more controlled than the HD25-1 II, which was one of my main grudge against the otherwise excellent headphone. Also, because of the lower impedance, I don't have to turn my volume to near max, just need about half of the volume. The remote is a little tricky/unintuitive (tap once to play/pause, twice to forward, three times to backward? Can't you just add two more buttons for convenience sake?), but still functional. Also, I can't really use HD25-1 II for more than one hour because of the pleather pads and tightness of clamp, but Amperior I can actually use for 2-3 hours with OK comfort.

So, I'll probably sell my HD25-1 II and keep the Amperior, because it is just a headphone better designed for travel. Too bad it didn't come with a traveling pouch or replacement earpads, unlike HD25-1 II...

post #606 of 1019
I really do want to try the PSB m4u 2 it sounds lime everything I'm looming for but at that price range for $100 more I could rebuy phonak audeo pfe232 which is by far the best I've heard. Decisions decisions
post #607 of 1019
Quote:
Originally Posted by devhen View Post

Just wanted to throw in my thoughts...

 

A lot of people seem to be frustrated or angered by the fact that Tyll claimed the Amperiors were obviously superior to the HD25, only to find the Amperior has a very similar sound. I think what you are forgetting is that Tyll is a very critical listener. The fact that the aluminum cups, which are a different material and also shaped differently, make for less resonance and an overall more accurate sound is what makes Tyll love them. His enthusiasm is also probably partly based on him being surprised that Senn was able to improve the already great HD25 without changing the sound signature. And the fact that he was less enthusiastic in the wall of fame post later on is not a surprise to me. We all somewhat lose enthusiasm for products once they aren't brand-spanking-new anymore. If you were expecting a different or improved sound signature over the HD25 I don't think you did your homework. They were designed to sound identical to the HD25 but with improved cups (less resonance/improved accuracy for the extremely picky listener) and increased sensitivity for plugging directly into mobile devices. So for me all of these reviews are pretty much exactly what I expected. If you don't think its worth the $150 premium I don't blame you. But personally, I never pay full price for headphones. Wait until the Apple store exclusivity period runs out and you can get them from someone like razordogdeals for less than MSRP and do it knowing that the only changes over the HD 25 are improved cups and increased sensitivity for non-amped setups and then I think you'll be happy with the Amperiors if these changes are advantageous for you.

 

I hear what you're saying and you make some good points. Tyll and I typically have very different preferences, so his reviews usually don't apply to someone like me anyway, but with me it was the progression that I was putting together. Back 9 months ago, he called the Beyer 1350s the "best sealed supra-aurals" he's ever heard. He said they were a must buy and that they were better than the venerable HD25s. I bought them and loved them. So then I see his review in March of this year for the Amperiors and he says the same thing again, that they were the best sealed supra-aurals he'd ever heard and that they "easily bested the HD25s and 1350s". Clearly he's a very technical, seasoned reviewer and I get your point about that, but I think it's pretty obvious why someone would make the assumption that there was more than just a slight improvement to the HD25s going on here. 

 

It's always best to listen for yourself, of course, but there are way too many headphones out there to do that. So in this case I put a fair amount of stock into the opinions of those who had experience with both the Amperiors and the HD25s, and when it seemed like more than half had returned them, it was a red flag. But my stance isn't that the Amperiors aren't good headphones....not even close. I just think maybe they aren't quite the revelation that Tyll indicated they were, and that's to be expected with reviews as you pointed out. You're right about MSRP...once that comes down I still want a pair :)

post #608 of 1019
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkpowder View Post

Just picked up a silver pair from Apple Store in Glasgow.  I originally planned on trying the P3 with a view to getting a pair of portable cans for casual listening on the go.  The P3 seemed to fit the bill until I realised how unsatifactory they sounded, and for that matter, the P5 were also underwhelming.  The latter pair were much better sounding than the P3 - more refined and tonally accurate, though still not the level of fidelity I wanted.  The sound signature is easy on the ear, but clearly not for the 'audiophile' - whatever that means nowadays.  So what did I do instead?  Buy a pair of these... blind.  I haven't heard the HD25s before so I didn't know what to expect either.  48 hours of "burn-in" later, I'm glad to find myself rather satisfied with my purchase.  It's been a while since I posted impressions so excuse the disorganised nature of this post - I'm typing what comes first to mind :P

 

The Amperior is for the most part a pretty accurate pair of headphones.  It gets the timbre of instruments largely spot on... The upper mids though are prominent, which is in itself not an issue unless of course they sound grainy, which they are.  It lacks warmth and at times comes across as quite thin.  This is particularly evident in the violin sections of orchestral recordings.  Maybe it is the fit of the headphone?  Well I have tried all manner of repositioning, pressure over the earcups to improve the seal etc to no avail. Thankfully my listening has diversified these days and I don't listening solely to classical symphonic genres.  Having said all that, the slight thinness at the upper midrange actually makes certain solo violin recording (solo works and concertos) sound pretty exciting.  There's a nice bite and raspness, just like in real life.  Listening to those double stops at near the beginning of Brahm's violin concerto is an absolute joy.

 

Now slightly lower down in the frequency range, the mid/mid-lower range where the bassoons and cellos reside, the Amperior is an absolute delight.  With a well-recorded track, there's a good amount of detail here and a weightiness to it.  There's not much wrong here.  Sadly, the bass and sub-bass may dominate a little too much for classical, often bleeding into the upper ranges.  It's reasonably well-controlled, just not as well as say a higher-end pair of cans might handle lower notes.  This is by no means a deal-killer as thankfully the degree of "bleeding" is only moderate and certainly bearable, at least for me it is.  For other genres like rock, pop, RnB, the bass is sufficient in volume, but maybe not in visceral punch.  

 

All in all, there is pretty decent bass extension, and a meaty bass too.  Tonally there's a good balance of bass/mids/highs with a general emphasis on the lower ranges.  The highs aren't sibilant at all and there's just enough shimmer to make the high hats sparkle.

 

The soundstaging is not spectacular.  Passable.  There is a sense of space and reasonably airy, which also describes the overall presentation.  It's not in-your-face like a pair of low-midrange Grados.  I can also make out where instruments come from, but again, the imaging is perhaps not pin-sharp like a pair of good electrostats.  The attack is in general well defined.  Sharp... ish.  Decay believable and realistic.  For its price range these are all very positive points.

 

From an ergonomics point of view, these cans are comfortable to wear, although I'm not sure how they'd fare on an 11 hour transatlantic flight.  The clamp on the head, whilst not offensive for an hour or two, may prove too much.  Isolation is good, too.  The build quality is solid.  It's a little strange to see such high quality machined metal cups juxtaposed by seemingly cheap plastiky parts, but whatever; the plastic bits look well made.  The one thing I'm not happy with is the flimsy interchangeable cable (the bottom half).  I'll certainly be replacing that with something more durable for use at home.  The one with the controls will remain for use on-the-go.

 

Anyway.  That's all I have time for at the moment.  The Amperiors are here to stay and I'm glad I didn't spend the same amount of money on the P5s, while more luxuriously fashioned, have a totally unremarkable sound.  Hope this helps any potential buyers who are still sitting on the fence.

 

Good read, man...very informative feedback. 

post #609 of 1019
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craigster75 View Post

I appreciate the cautionary tale and have a contingency plan if they don't meet expectations which includes somehow convincing my wife that I really NEED Signature Pros.  My contingency for the contingency are PSB M4U2s or waiting for the less expensive, unamped M4U1.

 

I'd be very interested in a 'unamped M4U1' if you could keep us updated on that one I'd be grateful... I also may buy (on Amazon's loaner/return system) the new 'Philips Fidelio M1' which has a few good reviews emerging cost over here is £160 (approx $250), could be a surprise this one.


Edited by OK-Guy - 7/7/12 at 4:11am
post #610 of 1019
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craigster75 View Post


Hey Niurez,

 

The good news is, you may not even need to spend $400.  I  wouldn't say that headphones are "slightly better" than in-ears since it is really personal preference and there are so many different in-ear headphones, some of which are among the best sound available.  Since all ears are different, obtaining a good seal with in-ears can be a challenge and even if they are not falling out, they can sound tinny and lifeless if there is not a good seal.  If you want to try out some in ears (high end audio stores have disposable tips so you can audition), I would recommend auditioning Shure, Westone, Monster and Ultimate Ears.  In the under $200 category, I am partial to the B&W C5 ($180) which only has a single driver and is bassy, but I really like the sound.

 

Regarding headphones, you can't go wrong with a classic standby- the ATH-M50.  Another headphone I like with detailed, accurate sound, but somewhat lacking in bass is the Sennheiser HD380, but it is not as compact.  In the on-ear category, the V-Moda M-80 has a very pleasing sound to my ears.  Each of these is under $200.  Above $200, some of the Beyerdynamics are considered good for gaming as they have an excellent soundstage.  They also make an on-ear, the DT-1350 that I have not heard, but has solid reviews.

 

For me personally, I am waiting for the V-Moda M-100 that comes out in a month ($299).  It is a full size over-ear, but folds nicely and comes with a compact, form-fitting case.  Even though there is a +8dB bass boost (which is a selling point for me), overall sound quality could be exceptional.  They are also semi-open so they will be good for portable use and may have some sound leakage, but the venting along with 50mm drivers should provide a good soundstage for gaming.  I would encourage you to check out the V-Moda M-100 discussion forum as I think it may meet all of your requirements.  I think the PSB M4U2 we discussed would work as well, but it does have more of an executive look.  The M-100 definitely wins with the coolness factor.

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/592389/v-moda-m-100-discussion-feedback-reviews-pics-etc/2625

 

Here is a link to a buying guide that should be helpful:

 

http://www.head-fi.org/a/buying-guide-headphones-by-price-range

 

Whatever you do, learn from my mistakes and don't buy a headphone without auditioning first unless there is a firm return policy. Best of luck and I hope this helps.

Hey craigster,

 

Sorry for answering so late but Ive been busy working and stuff. This week I went to an audio store to listen to some of the cans that are in my personal list. I only auditioned the B&W P5 and even though they sounded better than the other cheaper models they really didn't suffice to my personal taste. I find that they just sounded pretty flat and I was not impressed overall also their bass was really lacking in my opinion. They do were very comfy and looked pretty cool. In my opinion the PSB M4U2 looks very cool, much more than the amperiors. They really win with the coolness factor. If they do sound like you described then I think that these will be my buy. How would you describe the soundstage for gaming?

 

The option to buy 2 headphones does not really appeal to me. I just want one headphone that is sufficient in all departments I earlier described. I want my future headphones to be a part of me if you know what I mean.

 

I really thank you for your advice!


Edited by Niurez - 7/7/12 at 10:52am
post #611 of 1019
Quote:
Originally Posted by Niurez View Post

Hey craigster,

 

Sorry for answering so late but Ive been busy working and stuff. This week I went to an audio store to listen to some of the cans that are in my personal list. I only auditioned the B&W P5 and even though they sounded better than the other cheaper models they really didn't suffice to my personal taste. I find that they just sounded pretty flat and I was not impressed overall also their bass was really lacking in my opinion. They do were very comfy and looked pretty cool. In my opinion the PSB M4U2 looks very cool, much more than the amperiors. They really win with the coolness factor. If they do sound like you described then I think that these will be my buy. How would you describe the soundstage for gaming?

 

The option to buy 2 headphones does not really appeal to me. I just want one headphone that is sufficient in all departments I earlier described. I want my future headphones to be a part of me if you know what I mean.

 

I really thank you for your advice!


I agree with you on the P5.  I actually recommended the C5 which is B&W's in-ear.  I can't really speak to gaming since I am an old dude in my 40's and haven't been a gamer since Sega Genesis, but the M4U2 definitely has a good soundstage for closed headphones.  I genuinely feel they are one of the best values out there for headphones since they offer detail found in much more expensive models, work as portables and for home use and sound great amped and unamped.  Worldwide Stereo (wwstereo.com) sometimes offers these at 10% off.


Edited by Craigster75 - 7/7/12 at 12:25pm
post #612 of 1019
post #613 of 1019
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkpowder View Post

Just picked up a silver pair from Apple Store in Glasgow.  I originally planned on trying the P3 with a view to getting a pair of portable cans for casual listening on the go.  The P3 seemed to fit the bill until I realised how unsatifactory they sounded, and for that matter, the P5 were also underwhelming.  The latter pair were much better sounding than the P3 - more refined and tonally accurate, though still not the level of fidelity I wanted.  The sound signature is easy on the ear, but clearly not for the 'audiophile' - whatever that means nowadays.  So what did I do instead?  Buy a pair of these... blind.  I haven't heard the HD25s before so I didn't know what to expect either.  48 hours of "burn-in" later, I'm glad to find myself rather satisfied with my purchase.  It's been a while since I posted impressions so excuse the disorganised nature of this post - I'm typing what comes first to mind :P

 

The Amperior is for the most part a pretty accurate pair of headphones.  It gets the timbre of instruments largely spot on... The upper mids though are prominent, which is in itself not an issue unless of course they sound grainy, which they are.  It lacks warmth and at times comes across as quite thin.  This is particularly evident in the violin sections of orchestral recordings.  Maybe it is the fit of the headphone?  Well I have tried all manner of repositioning, pressure over the earcups to improve the seal etc to no avail. Thankfully my listening has diversified these days and I don't listening solely to classical symphonic genres.  Having said all that, the slight thinness at the upper midrange actually makes certain solo violin recording (solo works and concertos) sound pretty exciting.  There's a nice bite and raspness, just like in real life.  Listening to those double stops at near the beginning of Brahm's violin concerto is an absolute joy.

 

Now slightly lower down in the frequency range, the mid/mid-lower range where the bassoons and cellos reside, the Amperior is an absolute delight.  With a well-recorded track, there's a good amount of detail here and a weightiness to it.  There's not much wrong here.  Sadly, the bass and sub-bass may dominate a little too much for classical, often bleeding into the upper ranges.  It's reasonably well-controlled, just not as well as say a higher-end pair of cans might handle lower notes.  This is by no means a deal-killer as thankfully the degree of "bleeding" is only moderate and certainly bearable, at least for me it is.  For other genres like rock, pop, RnB, the bass is sufficient in volume, but maybe not in visceral punch.  

 

All in all, there is pretty decent bass extension, and a meaty bass too.  Tonally there's a good balance of bass/mids/highs with a general emphasis on the lower ranges.  The highs aren't sibilant at all and there's just enough shimmer to make the high hats sparkle.

 

The soundstaging is not spectacular.  Passable.  There is a sense of space and reasonably airy, which also describes the overall presentation.  It's not in-your-face like a pair of low-midrange Grados.  I can also make out where instruments come from, but again, the imaging is perhaps not pin-sharp like a pair of good electrostats.  The attack is in general well defined.  Sharp... ish.  Decay believable and realistic.  For its price range these are all very positive points.

 

From an ergonomics point of view, these cans are comfortable to wear, although I'm not sure how they'd fare on an 11 hour transatlantic flight.  The clamp on the head, whilst not offensive for an hour or two, may prove too much.  Isolation is good, too.  The build quality is solid.  It's a little strange to see such high quality machined metal cups juxtaposed by seemingly cheap plastiky parts, but whatever; the plastic bits look well made.  The one thing I'm not happy with is the flimsy interchangeable cable (the bottom half).  I'll certainly be replacing that with something more durable for use at home.  The one with the controls will remain for use on-the-go.

 

Anyway.  That's all I have time for at the moment.  The Amperiors are here to stay and I'm glad I didn't spend the same amount of money on the P5s, while more luxuriously fashioned, have a totally unremarkable sound.  Hope this helps any potential buyers who are still sitting on the fence.

Thanks for the excellent write-up.  Although I'm still in the process of burning mine in and have very different musical tastes, your analysis articulates really well what I've experienced so far.  I never heard the HD25's either and purchased the Amperiors blind.  I was looking for something I could plug unamped into my iPhone/iPad and still get the best sound for the price, as well as something with a different sound signature from my AKG k702's (got that for sure!).  What impresses me the most so far is the bass, at least for pop/dance/electronica.  Although, like you, I have minor quibbles with the cord (hate the ball point pen thing on the remote one), overall I'm very happy with them so far. 

post #614 of 1019
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkpowder View Post

Just picked up a silver pair from Apple Store in Glasgow.

 

<snip>

 

Hope this helps any potential buyers who are still sitting on the fence.

 

Nice review. Your impressions of the Amperior largely seem to match my own (there's a link a few posts above if you're interested in seeing them). 

post #615 of 1019

I don't have much interest in a 18-impedance HD25, but I'd love some silver (or black!) anodized cups for my HD25s.

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