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An audiophile and petrolhead's journal: Buckle up! - Page 64

post #946 of 7692

I've been wondering about this issue for a while and the thread has kind of stirred my thoughts, so let me put this question to you.

 

Is the current design trend related to a decrease in the desire for personal mobility? I mean personally, I would like to own a good car, but it just doesn't seem to be worth the hassle, with all the insurance, repairs and traffic. So I rely on the public transport. Most of the drivers I see out there are mostly alone, in a 4-5 seater car.


Edited by proton007 - 11/14/12 at 5:47pm
post #947 of 7692
Quote:
Originally Posted by Windsor View Post

I don't understand your above response, but I feel very grateful to be listening with my HD 800 as I type this. I muchly recommend it as a truly first-class headphone, one of the very finest I have yet heard.

My admiration for the HD 800 - in addition to its immensely revealing sonic performance - increased a lot when I read its manual, which presents Sennheiser's meticulous attention to detail in the creation of the HD 800.

smily_headphones1.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by Windsor View Post

Nice forthcoming acquisition, MM! I'm listening with my HD 800 for the first time in around half a week and was just about to ask you if you have heard it when I saw this. Great headphone, what clarity! smily_headphones1.gif

from the above quote, i thought you meant when you were looking at the red hd800, the music was sounding clearer on your own hd800 biggrin.gif
i do get what you mean though, just teasing you
post #948 of 7692

You have a point but I guess it also comes down to preference. I just hate catching the bus and waiting on the bus to get from destination to destination. In all honesty if it was safer and decently close I'd much rather ride bike but that's out of the question where I live lol. I use to do that living in Kailua though.
 

post #949 of 7692
Quote:
Originally Posted by lee730 View Post

You have a point but I guess it also comes down to preference. I just hate catching the bus and waiting on the bus to get from destination to destination. In all honesty if it was safer and decently close I'd much rather ride bike but that's out of the question where I live lol. I use to do that living in Kailua though.
 


Well, the US is an exception in this regard. The US public transport system is not the most efficient, to be honest. A few places I've found the bus stop sign the size of a postcard, and the bus stop itself is just a lamp post. I took a bus from Detroit city to the airport once, not the most memorable of my journeys.

 

But yes, what I mean is that most ppl nowadays are looking for an air conditioned box to sit in. There's no driving pleasure to be had, when all you do is sit in traffic 80% of the time.


Edited by proton007 - 11/14/12 at 6:07pm
post #950 of 7692

One of my hobbies in my teens was buying the UK car magazine Top Marques, which on a monthly basis lists some of the UK's most desirable cars. I would gaze open-eyed and with eager delight at the contemplation of owning the cars listed. Seeing this thread has prompted some similar feelings from within me and I thank the car-lovers who have contributed photos to this thread. smile.gif


Edited by Windsor - 11/14/12 at 6:08pm
post #951 of 7692
on that note, toronto's public transit is utter crap
even with new subway trains, the number of lines are limited and paying for fares is absurd
taiwan's subway is leagues ahead of what toronto has, especially with the card swiping which charges based on distance
post #952 of 7692

biggrin.gif

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by fuzzyash View Post

from the above quote, i thought you meant when you were looking at the red hd800, the music was sounding clearer on your own hd800 biggrin.gif

 

The opposite presides, IMO: The less I'm aware of a headphone, the clearer the music is presented. smily_headphones1.gif

post #953 of 7692
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magick Man View Post


Try finding an AMX/3 for under $300k. wink.gif Check this, a Pantera with an AMX/3 body kit. eek.gif **** me, that's beautiful.

 

Actually I was looking at that. That picture is actually photoshopped.  The guy who originally posted it bought an original amx/3 concept body, just the fiberglass shell, then he produced a few replicas of it.  He had it sitting on a pantera kit car frame at first, then decided to build an custom frame.  At the moment he has one unfinished AMX/3 Kit car, with a built 390 v8 and a few more body shells.  His goal was to create a line of kit cars, but he ran out of cash.   He is currently looking for investors.  Perhaps you could invest. :D

 

http://www.amx390.com

 


Edited by cheapfi - 11/14/12 at 6:54pm
post #954 of 7692
Quote:
Originally Posted by proton007 View Post

I've been wondering about this issue for a while and the thread has kind of stirred my thoughts, so let me put this question to you.

Is the current design trend related to a decrease in the desire for personal mobility? I mean personally, I would like to own a good car, but it just doesn't seem to be worth the hassle, with all the insurance, repairs and traffic. So I rely on the public transport. Most of the drivers I see out there are mostly alone, in a 4-5 seater car.

This has been a big debate in SoCal for a long time. We are the poster children for "1 man, 1 car" sitting in traffic on a packed freeway. There is no question in my mind that the government wants to drive people away from personal transportation. At the same time, very few people want to invest the time and money to build a really useful public transportation system in Southern California. I rode the Metrolink commuter trains for ~8 years. It was OK - but too expensive, not very convenient and not very comfortable. The only good part was that I had a WWAN card in my laptop, so I could cruise the internet for the 90 minutes I was on the train.

I think it is VERY much dependent on your specific local area. If everything you do is easily reachable by public transportation, then great - why not. But when you want to go to that really cool audio store that is an hour away and there is no public transportation, then what? And what about dating? Or simply having the freedom to go somewhere *right now*? I'm a typical SoCal resident - I would be miserable without my car!
post #955 of 7692
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post


I think it is VERY much dependent on your specific local area. If everything you do is easily reachable by public transportation, then great - why not. But when you want to go to that really cool audio store that is an hour away and there is no public transportation, then what? And what about dating? Or simply having the freedom to go somewhere *right now*? I'm a typical SoCal resident - I would be miserable without my car!

 

Agree. I like cars, a lot. 

But I tried driving my dad's car when I was to get my driving license, and I was pretty crap. Haven't driven in a few years now. But I try to satisfy my craving with racing sims.

post #956 of 7692
Quote:
Originally Posted by veyrongatti View Post

Well in Australia insurance cost more then an arm and an leg if you are under 25 not to mention you have to be on a P plate for 4 years I think? and on your P plates they have a terrible system of not letting you drive certain cars that has 8 cylinders and above or if it uses forced induction. However you are allowed to drive this..... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KsZQX2tzNhI since it only has 4 cylinders......... tongue.gif

That...sucks. Really bad. I will enjoy driving my big V8 monster this morning even more, knowing that there are children in other parts of the world who would be grateful to have it. redface.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by proton007 View Post

I've been wondering about this issue for a while and the thread has kind of stirred my thoughts, so let me put this question to you.

Is the current design trend related to a decrease in the desire for personal mobility? I mean personally, I would like to own a good car, but it just doesn't seem to be worth the hassle, with all the insurance, repairs and traffic. So I rely on the public transport. Most of the drivers I see out there are mostly alone, in a 4-5 seater car.

I'm alone in a 3 seater car. wink.gif

But yeah I can see what you're saying to some extent - I've lived in a few metro areas in the last few years, with varying quality of mass-transit. By and large I like mass transit, but still maintain a car for the weekends, getting TO a transit terminal, and other "I want it now" things (like grocery shopping - can't really do that via bus or train where I am (before I moved, I used to take the train to shop weekly - it was actually really nice), and walking 6-7 miles is just obscene with a lot of groceries). The biggest issue is not that Americans aren't interested in doing mass transit right, it's that the design paradigm for urban sprawl and suburban/exurban planning is antithetical to not owning a car. For example, I take a combination of bus and commuter rail in the mornings - it's roughly a ~26 mile trip one way (and it takes about 30 minutes, and is faster than driving, because the bus runs in its own lane, and the train obviously doesn't wait for traffic (to a fault - I think we're up to six pedestrian strikes this year alone! not quite as bad as Dallas, but still)); I have to drive around four miles from my home to the nearest transit terminal though! How is that effective? Or getting groceries - the nearest store is again, around 5 miles off. And I'm not "in the sticks" here, I'm in one of the wealthiest suburbs of one of the most populous metro areas in the western US.

But if you look at truly planned cities (like Salt Lake, where I used to live), the pre-suburb/exurb sections especially, you really can walk or bike everywhere. And their addition of commuter rail just makes everything much faster - you can EASILY go from home to work, and back again, and do all of your shopping, entertainment, etc just on the train. And yes I've gone on dates using the train. And shopping. And so on and so on. And it is just "normal." But there is a reason Salt Lake is used in a lot of urban/city planning courses as a case study today - it stands out. It's also much smaller than most cities (total population for the city itself is under 200,000), so that contributes too.

Contrast this to DC, where you have relatively good public transit in the CBD (the "disneyland effect"), but when you start getting into the suburbs, exurbs, or if you want to be mean, consider the entire MSA - mass transit is a joke. And really it's the same story here. Sure, we're spending something like three billion dollars (it's doubled our taxes over the last 7 years, we have like the second highest salestax in the US because of it, and it's still not finished) to add more rail lines, and it still will be barely worthwile by and large. Because again, the way suburbs and exurbs and so on are designed they don't lend themselves to mass transit (mass transit is actually a similar logical problem as doing laundry, if that helps you conceptualize it as a data flow easier).

Honestly, I like my car, but I don't like needing it. That's what annoys me - that it's kind of a forced choice.
post #957 of 7692
Quote:
Originally Posted by obobskivich View Post


That...sucks. Really bad. I will enjoy driving my big V8 monster this morning even more, knowing that there are children in other parts of the world who would be grateful to have it. redface.gif
I'm alone in a 3 seater car. wink.gif
But yeah I can see what you're saying to some extent - I've lived in a few metro areas in the last few years, with varying quality of mass-transit. By and large I like mass transit, but still maintain a car for the weekends, getting TO a transit terminal, and other "I want it now" things (like grocery shopping - can't really do that via bus or train where I am (before I moved, I used to take the train to shop weekly - it was actually really nice), and walking 6-7 miles is just obscene with a lot of groceries). The biggest issue is not that Americans aren't interested in doing mass transit right, it's that the design paradigm for urban sprawl and suburban/exurban planning is antithetical to not owning a car. For example, I take a combination of bus and commuter rail in the mornings - it's roughly a ~26 mile trip one way (and it takes about 30 minutes, and is faster than driving, because the bus runs in its own lane, and the train obviously doesn't wait for traffic (to a fault - I think we're up to six pedestrian strikes this year alone! not quite as bad as Dallas, but still)); I have to drive around four miles from my home to the nearest transit terminal though! How is that effective? Or getting groceries - the nearest store is again, around 5 miles off. And I'm not "in the sticks" here, I'm in one of the wealthiest suburbs of one of the most populous metro areas in the western US.
But if you look at truly planned cities (like Salt Lake, where I used to live), the pre-suburb/exurb sections especially, you really can walk or bike everywhere. And their addition of commuter rail just makes everything much faster - you can EASILY go from home to work, and back again, and do all of your shopping, entertainment, etc just on the train. And yes I've gone on dates using the train. And shopping. And so on and so on. And it is just "normal." But there is a reason Salt Lake is used in a lot of urban/city planning courses as a case study today - it stands out. It's also much smaller than most cities (total population for the city itself is under 200,000), so that contributes too.
Contrast this to DC, where you have relatively good public transit in the CBD (the "disneyland effect"), but when you start getting into the suburbs, exurbs, or if you want to be mean, consider the entire MSA - mass transit is a joke. And really it's the same story here. Sure, we're spending something like three billion dollars (it's doubled our taxes over the last 7 years, we have like the second highest salestax in the US because of it, and it's still not finished) to add more rail lines, and it still will be barely worthwile by and large. Because again, the way suburbs and exurbs and so on are designed they don't lend themselves to mass transit (mass transit is actually a similar logical problem as doing laundry, if that helps you conceptualize it as a data flow easier).
Honestly, I like my car, but I don't like needing it. That's what annoys me - that it's kind of a forced choice.

 

lmao sound like the same rail BS we have taking place here. When plans initially started I think it was around 3 billion? Then delays and up to 5 billion. Now hearing it will be from 8 to 10 billion when the project is done. This is the kicker here. They want to bring in all the contractors (workers) from the mainland and leave the islanders here without the jobs. What a joke and what a huge waste of money. The rail won't be accessible to all parts of the island. Just certain areas. Still a big fat fail IMO. We could build 7 H3 Freeways for the price of this crap rail system lol.


Edited by lee730 - 11/15/12 at 2:53am
post #958 of 7692
Quote:
Originally Posted by lee730 View Post

lmao sound like the same rail BS we have taking place here. When plans initially started I think it was around 3 billion? Then delays and up to 5 billion. Now hearing it will be from 8 to 10 billion when the project is done. This is the kicker here. They want to bring in all the contractors (workers) from the mainland and leave the islanders here without the jobs. What a joke and what a huge waste of money. The rail won't be accessible to all parts of the island. Just certain areas. Still a big fat fail IMO. We could build 7 H3 Freeways for the price of this crap rail system lol.

Yeah. To put it another way - we have the most expensive section of the Interstate highway system here, and it cost less than our rail expansion. And all the rail expansion will do is connect the wealthiest suburbs to the airport, to let the granolas feel superior (you know, because having an LS-600h isn't enough). They stopped expanding in low income areas about a decade ago.

Sales tax went from around 5% to just over 10% - all of it goes to funding this transportation project. Oh yeah, and did I mention that our highways are falling apart and undersized (we *invented* "patch and pray")? Makes sense to me!

I think most of the contractors are brought in from Germany too; it's all being done by Siemens AG (and it was a no-bid, which is of course the fair way to do things).
post #959 of 7692
Quote:
Originally Posted by obobskivich View Post


Yeah. To put it another way - we have the most expensive section of the Interstate highway system here, and it cost less than our rail expansion. And all the rail expansion will do is connect the wealthiest suburbs to the airport, to let the granolas feel superior (you know, because having an LS-600h isn't enough). They stopped expanding in low income areas about a decade ago.
Sales tax went from around 5% to just over 10% - all of it goes to funding this transportation project. Oh yeah, and did I mention that our highways are falling apart and undersized (we *invented* "patch and pray")? Makes sense to me!
I think most of the contractors are brought in from Germany too; it's all being done by Siemens AG (and it was a no-bid, which is of course the fair way to do things).


lol the patch and pray is the same bs happening here. Actually what they pray for is that you are too stupid or lazy to file a claim as they make it like you are a criminal to try and get compensation for damages due to their roads. If they intended to fix the problem they would need to dig up the bad area and repave that small section. Patching is just a lazy ass way out and actually makes the problem worse like an infected wound spreading. rolleyes.gif

post #960 of 7692

Anyone watching the American Grand Prix this weekend? I can't, too late in the night for me.

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