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An audiophile and petrolhead's journal: Buckle up! - Page 480

post #7186 of 7196
What happened to all the Australian regulations about requiring a percentage of local content in the cars?

I was thinking about the cost of new cars on this morning's commute. I think now more than ever before, the car manufacturers are simply pricing themselves out of the market. Are the number of *new* cars being sold into the retail channel (not to corporate & rental fleets) going up or down? I'm still seeing a lot of new cars on the road - but I don't see how most people can afford them. I suppose the 5 year lease with massive residual charges and low mileage allowances are the way it's being done - leverage the future to satisfy your current desires. Typical short-sighted human thought processes. rolleyes.gif

I was also thinking about another question...

Let's suppose that you wake up one day, and ALL the cars and people in the world are GONE. They aren't dead and there are not bodies and wrecks strewn over the roads - they have just disappeared. The streets, roads, highways and interstates are completely WIDE OPEN - not a soul anywhere to be found.

OK, now, in that world here's my question: How fast would you drive? There's no traffic and no traffic laws. How fast would you go?

I suspect that in this scenario, the vast majority of people I see on the road would drive exactly the same speed. The don't seem to *drive* their cars, they simply ride in them with the absolute minimum amount of brain power devoted to the operation of the car and the road around them.

It's probably more than just the desire to drive - the vast majority of cars (excluding exotics) are now designed with the typical highway cruising speed in mind. These cars are NOT happy when they are actually *driven*. The transmissions now assume you want to cruise at 60 MPH and never need to pass another car. So - if the manufacturers could remove the road speed restrictions AND the cluttering of the roads with all those other cars, would they build cars that are more comfortable cruising at higher speeds? Would you drive these new cars at the higher speeds? How high?
post #7187 of 7196
Thread Starter 
I love how people say, "you shouldn't post that!", then they quote you... really? wink.gif


(there's a reason for it)


How fast would I drive? If it's for fun, as fast as I could without being "at serious risk". So it would depend on the car. As you know, exotics and high-end GTs are usually quite comfortable at 150mph+.
post #7188 of 7196
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magick Man View Post

I love how people say, "you shouldn't post that!", then they quote you... really? wink.gif


(there's a reason for it)

How fast would I drive? If it's for fun, as fast as I could without being "at serious risk". So it would depend on the car. As you know, exotics and high-end GTs are usually quite comfortable at 150mph+.


Well, you can edit a post. See it's like ........................magic:)

hint.

 

No laws no limits. Probably about 120 to cruise with bursts up to whatever on long visible straights. I suspect in a post apocalyptic scenario like that deer and wildlife in general would become a vastly larger problem and punting Bambi at a buck and a half is a bad day for everyone. At 120 I think you can get on the brakes quick enough in daylight to avoid it.

post #7189 of 7196
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post


OK, now, in that world here's my question: How fast would you drive? There's no traffic and no traffic laws. How fast would you go?
 

Being a reckless teenager? 200 KM/H

post #7190 of 7196
Abbott doesn't realize that Airlines and Car manufacturers all over the world get subsidised by the Govt and he wants to get them off the government teat which will prove to be a major mistake down the road.

The Japanese government paid for the Prius from its own pocket, Emirates gets subsidised by the govt. Just a couple examples.
post #7191 of 7196
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magick Man View Post

Umm, thanks guys, I think. I believe we'll just hold on to them, though we did hire security for the garage(s). Walked by one this evening and I was like, "Wow, he has a .40 cal and a 12ga pump". I hate that, but it is what it is.
One issue is that manufacturing costs are so high in Aus, all countries with higher than average labor costs are losing their factories (unless the company is firmly based in that country and gets special tax breaks). New cars are much more expensive due to more restrictive manufacturing processes (emissions regs) and more exotic materials, so something has to give, unless everyone wants to pay 30-50% more for their cars, overnight. US states are paying companies to build their factories in their states, to counter the higher costs. It's crazy.

 

Basically that is what happened, the car companies were receiving subsidies to remain in Australia.  That idea is crazy from an entrepreneurial point of view...I have to agree, and I have never discussed such matters with people from the other side of the class struggle so your point of view is very important to me.

 

I just wonder sometimes if perhaps modern democracies are veering to far into corporatism.  I don't believe a country should operate under pure market forces and governments must intervene as its primary role is social engineering, not profit. 

 

Its a bit like denying a child in modernised societies access to an Xbox to play video games (or whatever every other child has access to).  It costs too much, and no real benefits seem evident.  But that is the cost of keeping up.  To not keep up will eventually cost much more, this concept should be pretty obvious.

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
With no laws and traffic...I would end up dead in a mangled car wreck.
post #7192 of 7196
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

What happened to all the Australian regulations about requiring a percentage of local content in the cars?

 

 

They're still in effect.  Australia has a massive support industry behind local manufacturing.  Tony Abott killed not just the car industry...but every other technology industry we have in support of this effort...cost effective know how in developing rear drive sports layouts, due to our V8 Supercar effort, gave us chassis rigidity and dynamics in line with the Germans...the Camaro and SS Chevrolet belongs to our Holden rear drive platform.

 

Admittedly the interior quality of Holdens and Fords are far behind the Germans and Japanese and even the Koreans are superior...this was always a problem and I am not sure why they didnt attack this issue head on.  This mind you is the same problem facing US cars...they're even worse than aussie interiors last time I looked and in 2010s the engineering looked like early 80s...so be warned.

 

The CSIRO just developed super hybrid capacitor batteries for cars...these high technology developments will cease with the loss of the auto industry.  Are we developing an aerospace industry to take up that technology gap...yeah, we gonna take on Lockheed Skunkworks...as if.  The negative ramifications may never rear its ugly head....or it will.

 

But...we still got the mines for now and that is all that matters right now.


Edited by SP Wild - Today at 1:11 am
post #7193 of 7196
I guess I'm more of a Friedman economist (or perhaps an "Economic Darwinist") - I think that as a society and a species, we're better off letting the market forces rule than we are with letting short-term thinkers (ie politicians & corporate executives) try to meddle "for the good of the people". If that means that large segments of the population, or entire countries turn into dust bowls - well, that's the price of long-term thinking. Natural selection (whether economic, social or biological) has determined that your particular branch on the tree of life isn't gonna work out. And BTW, I take the same stand when considering the planet as a whole. If we, as a species, take the planet to the point where it can no longer sustain the current biological life - well, gee - that sucks - but I don't think we have a divine right to exist in this universe, and I guess our little branch of Yggdrasil isn't gonna work out. Hopefully, there's a planet full of cockroaches, squid or gaseous clouds of Chlorine somewhere out there that can make another go of it - but if not... *shrugs*...

Douglas Adams said it best:
Quote:
“Space," it says, "is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mindbogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist's, but that's just peanuts to space...
post #7194 of 7196

Billy, you're correct that we don't really have a natural "right" of any sort to exist, but a large part of the evolutionary process involves each species using its own available intellectual tools to preserve its existence. Our chief asset is our minds and our ability to create physical tools and high-level processes with those minds, and I don't have a problem with using those processes to forward our survival. If the evolutionary process has endowed us with the power to control the climate to our liking in the long term and to harness the earth's energies and materials for our own preservation and comfort, I see that as a natural, not artificial, means of survival. I see our complex societies and industries as an extension of nature, and I have no problem with collectively acting to change our environment to suit our needs. It's selfish, but it falls in line with the same Darwinistic principles you espouse. In the same way that our actions could bring about our own deaths as a species one day, our intellect can preserve us for longer if we support concentrated efforts do to so.

post #7195 of 7196
Yes, I didn't mean we should all be sitting in caves hiding from Smilodons - I agree with you, we should use our intellects to survive. I just don't think we can *legislate* our survival. Creating laws that are for the "betterment of the society" mean nothing if society doesn't actually believe what the law says - and if society *does* believe, then there's no need for the law!

Douglas Adams has many other excellent lines directly addressing all of this:
Quote:
It is a well-known fact that those people who must want to rule people are, ipso facto, those least suited to do it... anyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job.
Quote:
A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools.
Quote:
Many were increasingly of the opinion that they’d all made a big mistake in coming down from the trees in the first place. And some said that even the trees had been a bad move, and that no one should ever have left the oceans.
post #7196 of 7196

Time for you to start the Devolution thread Billy:)

 

Or, we can all just sit down and watch "Melancholia" again.

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