Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Members' Lounge (General Discussion) › An audiophile and petrolhead's journal: Buckle up!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

An audiophile and petrolhead's journal: Buckle up! - Page 435

post #6511 of 7351
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

I think this is where an opportunity might lie. We don't need to make the big prestigious top-tier universities bigger - we need to make the lower-tier schools better and we need to build more of them in more states. The smaller schools need more interesting undergraduate programs - they need to be capable of producing more than just the typical liberal arts degrees. I also think industry has a part to play as well. They should be looking to the smaller state schools when hiring and helping those schools to improve their programs and produce more interns & graduates that can directly add value to their businesses.

And now back to our regularly scheduled program...

When I was looking at schools a few years back, this was something that I liked about the University of Wisconsin system. Though it's true that UW Madison is the big, 40K-student school for everything, many of the regional outposts of the university do some things very well, even better than Madison, for cheaper, especially if you're an undergraduate student.

 

UW La Crosse has a unique 5-year accelerated Master's in Software Engineering that no other UW school has, UW Platteville has an impressive mine engineering and mechanical engineering program, and UW Milwaukee has the best architecture and medical programs in the state and among the best in the region. All of these are significantly cheaper than UW Madison, and an out-of-state student can reasonably get their total costs under $20K a year at any of them. Those regional outposts of the university system also feed into graduate programs at Madison and Milwaukee, so you can save money on undergraduate (while receiving a better, more personal education than you would at Madison) and be ahead of the pack when you enter graduate school.

 

I didn't end up attending a school in the UW system because of some generous scholarship offers at universities with greater prestige (my scores were on the top edge of my graduating high school class), but Wisconsin's system is by far the best example I've seen of what you're talking about.


Edited by ssrock64 - 4/5/14 at 6:53am
post #6512 of 7351
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssrock64 View Post

I wasn't that far off the mark, given your stories about your daughter. I think that in the image you posted you look quite a bit younger, perhaps about the age of your typical Jalopnik editor. Maybe you just look younger than your age, anyways. biggrin.gif

I'm assuming you got a letter from McLaren about the MP4-12C's discontinuation? What did it say?

I don't think I received a letter, but it may be sitting in the pile on my desk at work, that I need to go through but have been passively avoiding.. redface.gif

However, reading the upgrades (all firmware) that McLaren is providing, to appease 12C owners, we already have those. We haven't been running the stock system for a long time, even IRIS has been upgraded to Jelly Bean and rooted (to allow the Play store and sideloading). We're waiting on devs in Croatia (no joke) to release a Kit Kat update. Unfortunately that's going to be the end of the road because the poor 1.2GHz single-core Arm CPU can't handle anymore. It's amazing what that little sucker is already doing.

I do look young for my age, as long as no one notices the crow's feet around my eyes.

Got to drive the Jaguar F coupe, the V6 S not the V8, and it's better than the roadster, by a lot. Also it's 200% more gorgeous in person, if that's even possible. (that @$$... it's hot) Plus Captain Kirk* was at the garage this week for the better part of a day (he's in a scene in some film being shot nearby), so that was fun. He probably would have had a better time if his driver's license weren't recently suspended. So much fail.



*the younger, not the older
post #6513 of 7351

Yeah you're young. Look at what we used to be able to do with 4.77 Mhz processors before Software Bloat" got invented.

 

Thought he only had a suspended license in New Zealand?

 

I like the Jag. It does however seem Aston Martinesque with of all things a Volvo rear end though.

post #6514 of 7351
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hutnicks View Post
 

Thought he only had a suspended license in New Zealand?

Does he have a valid U.S. license?

 

Keep in mind I have no idea who the younger Kirk is, so that might be a stupid question if he's an American.

 

As far as the F-Type goes, I honestly believe it's the best-looking sports coupe on sale today (and one of the best-sounding).

post #6515 of 7351
Thread Starter 
He's American, but his California license was suspended pending DUI charges in New Zealand.
post #6516 of 7351
Quote:
Originally Posted by gikigill View Post

Should those who can't afford it just pull themselves up by their "bootstraps".

The "free market" has spoken loud and clear. After all no one is forcing you to go to university.

What are you some kind of "commie" billybob :-P

Hmm, I do think I have become more liberal as I have gotten older. When I was young I was about as far right as you can get - just past Atilla The Hun. I'm still fiscally conservative, but I've become more socially liberal - in fact, as the right has become more invasive in my personal space, I became more and more libertarian.

Still, what I'm proposing is not "equality for all" - I'm simply trying to make the education industry more efficient. A school with 40,000 students and priced at $30K/year tuition has a potential revenue of $1.2 Billion dollars a year. Now add all the television money the NCAA Division I athletic programs generate plus the federal & private money used to build and run huge research labs plus a piece of the concessions for the Starbucks, Subway, etc that every large campus now has. There's some serious cash flowing though those big schools every year.

The dichotomy between the big mega-schools and the small state public campuses is jarring. If you want to be an elementary school teacher or get a liberal arts degree that probably won't actually be your career - then the typical small public schools are a great deal. I think those schools should strive to be more than that. Maybe what the US needs to do is go back to the roots of "technical universities" - which were colleges that concentrated on providing undergraduate degrees in much more practical areas of study. Schools like Georgia Tech, Rensselaer Polytechnic, Cal Poly, Texas A&M, etc, etc, were originally founded to concentrate on preparing students for careers in agriculture, engineering, hard sciences and other subjects directly applicable to an industrial nation. Somewhere along the line, the liberal arts took over and created departments for Marketing, Communications, Cultural Diversity, Political Science, International Law, Telephone Sanitizing and other "B-Ark" degrees. In today's world, the smaller schools should dismantle those liberal arts programs and instead add IT, Environmental Sciences, Bio Engineering, Materials Science, Robotics, Industrial Design, etc.
post #6517 of 7351

You raise a valid solution billybob but putting politics aside , why should I not take a chunk of that 1,2 billion for my shareholders profits and a biogger bonus for me instead

 

of ensuring even better standards for students teachers and learning apparatus/facilities?

 

If a few leave, it wont affect me and besides its their career they will jeopardize as they might not find another school to give 30k to or might not be able to

 

raise 30k more to move.

 

Education institutions have a veritable monopoly  hence need to be controlled and regulated and in a society like America, that ain't happening. How many kids will fight a

 

university and what will they gain by winning?

 

The right wing already is anti education and anti intellectual and combined with free market ********, the shareholders will win every time and your kid will

 

be second to their interests.

post #6518 of 7351
Most private universities are "private, not for profit" - so there aren't shareholder profits to be distributed. That's why they are able to get the donations and grants. Of course, there are still salaries paid to the administrators. The large public universities are *supposed* to be part of the state government - but they have taken on a life of their own and have their snouts in both the public and private troughs. I really don't think it's a right vs left situation - I think it's more due to the education industry being far too enamored with the smell of their own farts. They simply see no reason to change - the administrators and regents listen only to each other and they can't (or are unwilling) to see the bigger picture. They have 50,000 applications for 5,000 freshman slots, so there's no need to change anything. I don't expect the large universities to change - why would they? However, the small, public universities are a different matter. That's my tax dollars they are messing with, and I think they can and should listen to the needs of the public - not just to each other. Change the smaller public universities, and the demand comes off the larger universities. Who knows, eventually, even the larger universities might see the light. Microsoft will still be giving millions to the University of Washington, but there are plenty of midsized companies that would like to have a local university they can work with. Many do it today, but I think they would do more if the schools were willing to listen.

Here's the list of majors available at my local state college:

Anthropology
Applied Physics
Art
Biology
Business
Chemistry
Chicano/a Studies
Communication
Computer Science
Early Childhood Studies
Economics
English: Literature and Writing
Environmental Science and Resource Management
History
Information Technology
Liberal Studies
Mathematics
Nursing
Performing Arts
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Spanish

The majority of those majors are suitable only for either becoming a teacher, or for the B-Ark. One of the largest biotechnology companies, Amgen, has their HQ 20 minutes from this campus - yet the best this school can do is "Biology" and "Chemistry"?? Where is the Bioengineering, Genetics, Manufacturing, Operations Research, Quality Management, etc, etc? Why can't these administrators see this? This is the primary issue.
post #6519 of 7351
Bah - I've sidetracked Magick's thread - enough of this! biggrin.gif
post #6520 of 7351
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post


Maybe what the US needs to do is go back to the roots of "technical universities" - which were colleges that concentrated on providing undergraduate degrees in much more practical areas of study. Schools like Georgia Tech, Rensselaer Polytechnic, Cal Poly, Texas A&M, etc, etc, were originally founded to concentrate on preparing students for careers in agriculture, engineering, hard sciences and other subjects directly applicable to an industrial nation.

Unfortunately, the emphasis on medical and liberal arts fields over the last couple of decades has led to an increase in costs at many of the schools you mentioned, which brings us back to our original dilemma. Luckily, the tides are turning because of the prevalence of computer science and biomedical engineering in the coming years, and technical schools are at an advantage again since more students are expressing interest.

 

Nobody wants to do what their parents did, so emphasis on certain traditional majors ebbs and flows over time while new technological ones constantly spring up. It's hard to plan for the future as an education system, which is why the biggest universities have programs in anything they can to cover their bases.

post #6521 of 7351
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

Bah - I've sidetracked Magick's thread - enough of this! biggrin.gif

I don't mind at all. We all can talk without getting hackles up, though HF's official policy is no politics, this is a very broad vital area that affects millions. Most businesses have figured out that a B.A. isn't worth much more than a HS diploma, in realistic terms, because it doesn't prepare a person for the workforce in most practical ways. Personally, I think most liberal arts degrees should come with a warning label:

"This document does not guarantee employment, nor improve your chances in finding it. For entertainment purposes only."

The young barista at my local Starbucks has a Master's in English, which I suppose may help when she's asking if a customer wants an extra splash of flavoring in their mochachino. I've listened to her woes several times, because she isn't shy in sharing them, and they mostly center around her $100,000 in student loans that she's barely made a dent in, even though she's been out of school for 5 years. She believes that she shouldn't have to pay it, and even voted for the current administration believing that they would expunge the debt. Wow, was she mad when she found out that wasn't going to happen... Last I heard, she'd defaulted on it and they were garnishing her pay. I eventually tuned her out though, because she refuses to believe any of it is her fault and once even implied that I was somehow to blame, "how much did you pay for that car you drove up in?" I simply told her, "You shouldn't end a sentence with a preposition", and that was the last time we spoke.

Anyway, by and large, for most people tech and trade schools are where it's at. Learn a valuable skill that you'll love doing, then become a master of it. Happiness in your career and financial stability will follow. Our FT garage mechanics make 40-60k /year, depending on work experience, not bad for 2-yr technical degrees in this area of the country, and our engineer makes 80k a 4 year certificate, that's not including the benefits packages. I'm a weirdo, but my belief is that well-paid employees are happy, reliable employees. You can't expect excellence, loyalty, and goodwill if you're a miserly bastard to your people, it doesn't get more basic than that.

.
Edited by Magick Man - 4/6/14 at 12:05pm
post #6522 of 7351
Very interesting thread.
post #6523 of 7351
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magick Man View Post


I don't mind at all. We all can talk without getting hackles up, though HF's official policy is no politics, this is a very broad vital area that affects millions. Most businesses have figured out that a B.A. isn't worth much more than a HS diploma, in realistic terms, because it doesn't prepare a person for the workforce in most practical ways. Personally, I think most liberal arts degrees should come with a warning label:

"This document does not guarantee employment, nor improve your chances in finding it. For entertainment purposes only."

The young barista at my local Starbucks has a Master's in English, which I suppose may help when she's asking if a customer wants an extra splash of flavoring in their mochachino. I've listened to her woes several times, because she isn't shy in sharing them, and they mostly center around her $100,000 in student loans that she's barely made a dent in, even though she's been out of school for 5 years. She believes that she shouldn't have to pay it, and even voted for the current administration believing that they would expunge the debt. Wow, was she mad when she found out that wasn't going to happen... Last I heard, she'd defaulted on it and they were garnishing her pay. I eventually tuned her out though, because she refuses to believe any of it is her fault and once even implied that I was somehow to blame, "how much did you pay for that car you drove up in?" I simply told her, "You shouldn't end a sentence with a preposition", and that was the last time we spoke.

Anyway, by and large, for most people tech and trade schools are where it's at. Learn a valuable skill that you'll love doing, then become a master of it. Happiness in your career and financial stability will follow. Our FT garage mechanics make 40-60k /year, depending on work experience, not bad for 2-yr technical degrees in this area of the country, and our engineer makes 80k a 4 year certificate, that's not including the benefits packages. I'm a weirdo, but my belief is that well-paid employees are happy, reliable employees. You can't expect excellence, loyalty, and goodwill if you're a miserly bastard to your people, it doesn't get more basic than that.

.


There's a few points in there to be dug out and polished up a bit. Begin with find what you love and pursue it. That got lost some 30 odd years ago when educations started becoming selected by expected income upon graduation. We now have a glut of mediocre professionals clogging up the system and in a lot of cases causing more work for others to clean up. Miserable lack of pre career counseling in an ever more complex world leads to even more mis educated persons (like your Starbucks Honey there ). We do little or no pre career prep. Much like financial planning skills these should begin about the same time Mathematics is introduced to a student (IE the elementary stages).

The only real forward move in education in the last century was the implementation of Co Op work terms. Brilliant piece of thinking and I sure wish it extended to more segments of post secondary education than it does.

 

I sincerely believe the student loan systems need urgent revamping. There is just too much abuse going on there, which denies some very talented impoverished people and that is borderline criminal.

 

As it currently stands, I think we will have more and more BA degrees floating around and an endless stream of "Marketing People" mediocre Legal types, and outright unemployables floating around in the US and Canada for quite some time.

 

Someone recently posited the opinion that we are breeding a population of Nascar addicts and Wal Mart shoppers. I am finding it hard to disagree with that thumbnail analysis.

post #6524 of 7351
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post
  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Topic left turn for a second...

I know this isn't news, but the cost of college tuition is completely insane. This concerns me on several levels. First, and most obviously, is the fact that I have child that will (hopefully) be attending college in the Fall of 2015. But beyond the personal challenge, it also makes me wonder how we have let a college education get so far out of reach for the average family. This can't be a good thing for our society, and I fear the long-term effects of an educational system that imposes this huge financial burden on the very students that we hope will someday lead our society into the future. I am a confirmed believer that talent and hard work should lead to benefits and advantages. Yet it seems that we're putting a tall financial hurdle in front of our kids before they can even show whether they have talent and are willing to work hard.

A few facts:

The going rate for one of the better known private or non-resident public universities is $35-45K/year in tuition. When you add on the rest of the fees, books, meal-plan, lodging, etc, the estimate for a freshman undergrad is $45-60K per year. Of course, staying in your resident state and attending a public universty is a much better deal - and California *used* to be a great deal for residents (one of the few perks of our outrageous tax rates) - but that also seems to now be gone. The estimate for attending one of the University of California schools as a California resident is ~$32K/year. The Cal State schools (like I attended) are a little cheaper, but of course they are also generally (with some exceptions) rated lower. The least expensive 4 year universities are small schools like the University of South Dakota or Cleveland State University. But even there, you are looking at $10K/year in tuition or $20K/year total.

So - each year of college at a school you really want to attend is going to cost at least $30K, and probably closer to $45K-$50K or more if you go out of state or to a private college. Financial aid? Maybe, but it probably won't be a significant amount if your parents are professionals that live above the poverty line. Scholarships? Some, but unless you fit one of the high-value categories or are in the top 1% of all college students, or you are an athlete, the scholarships will likely only be enough to cover books for the year. Loans? Yeah, that's probably the most likely source of funds (other than whatever your parents have been able to save). It's the modern way, right? Run up the debt until you can't possibly see a way out of the hole. Start your life as an adult with a quarter-million dollar debt. That just ain't right.

There has to be a better way. Universities are being given billions of dollars in research grants by both private donations and the Feds. That increases the prestige of the school - attracting more and more students and more grant money from around the world. Yet the tuition costs continue to increase at a rate that far outpaces inflation or the rise in salaries for the students those colleges graduate every year. This doesn't seem like a sustainable model.

I think the California UC & CSU system used to be a good model. The costs were very low and the quality of the education was very good. But, somewhere in the last 30 years, something went wrong. The bigger schools (UC Berkeley, UCSD, UCLA, etc) became huge and began acting like expensive private universities, and the smaller CSU schools began to decline in quality and their prestige dropped even while the costs continued to climb.

I think this is where an opportunity might lie. We don't need to make the big prestigious top-tier universities bigger - we need to make the lower-tier schools better and we need to build more of them in more states. The smaller schools need more interesting undergraduate programs - they need to be capable of producing more than just the typical liberal arts degrees. I also think industry has a part to play as well. They should be looking to the smaller state schools when hiring and helping those schools to improve their programs and produce more interns & graduates that can directly add value to their businesses.

And now back to our regularly scheduled program...

 

 

Doesn't the government have some sort of program where they give you a low interest loan? 

post #6525 of 7351

Putting aside the liberal arts, there is no shortage of STEM graduates who are not having a lot of success with their job

 

prospects and even when they do get a job, its very low paid due to the intense competition and there is a choice between

 

paying student loans or having a decent middle class existence.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Members' Lounge (General Discussion) › An audiophile and petrolhead's journal: Buckle up!