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An audiophile and petrolhead's journal: Buckle up! - Page 402

post #6016 of 7369
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magick Man View Post

The way I understand it, ~12 are built and ready, the rest are rolling chassis (all targas) awaiting specific parts for whichever model the customer wants.
I had one, a regular Grand Sport, for 3 weeks, and I did take it over 200 on the track, but if any car can do that and be boring, it's a Veyron. I can't imagine what they're doing that could make 175mph in one exciting, maybe they blindfold the drivers? biggrin.gif

Must be why Button dealt his off.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

I was trolling the local lots and I saw one that made me think of you guys...
http://www.allenmotors.com/1962_Chevrolet_Corvair_Thousand%20Oaks_CA_224052316.veh

It wasn't in great shape, and it looked like the engine had quite of bit backyard mechanic in it.

10 grand seems a little steep. Although I am curious as to that mileage.

Cant really tell but that looks like a Webber carb setup. Probably just wishful thinking on my part.

post #6017 of 7369

The one knock I've always had against modern BMWs (M5 excepted) is the same as Magick's against the Veyron. There's so much engineering work put into making the car composed at speed that it's no longer any fun to go fast. The last time I was in Germany, I took the top non-M 3-Series performance variant at the time (~2010) outside Hamburg on an unrestricted section of the Autobahn, and the whole trip was just a couple of quiet passes at speed followed by the inevitable slowdown whenever somebody was in the left lane passing someone else below the lane's pace. I may have been going fast and the car was definitely very capable and smooth, but it was not exciting in any way whatsoever.

post #6018 of 7369
Thread Starter 

Edited by Magick Man - 2/22/14 at 6:44pm
post #6019 of 7369
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hutnicks View Post

Must be why Button dealt his off.

10 grand seems a little steep. Although I am curious as to that mileage.
Cant really tell but that looks like a Webber carb setup. Probably just wishful thinking on my part.

Yeah, I thought $10K was high as well - and there is no freaking way that mileage is correct. I'm guessing the odo rolled over - 1962 was way before the 6-digit odometer became common. I didn't look closely at the carbs, but they didn't look like Webers - I think the oblong aftermarket air cleaners just tend to give that impression. The inside of the engine bay lid look like it had been hacked up, and it also had louvers cut into the lid, which I know is a fairly common mod.
post #6020 of 7369
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post


Yeah, I thought $10K was high as well - and there is no freaking way that mileage is correct. I'm guessing the odo rolled over - 1962 was way before the 6-digit odometer became common. I didn't look closely at the carbs, but they didn't look like Webers - I think the oblong aftermarket air cleaners just tend to give that impression. The inside of the engine bay lid look like it had been hacked up, and it also had louvers cut into the lid, which I know is a fairly common mod.


On the looking for a replacement car thingy. Apparently, Nissan has re introduced the Micra????? My spy tells me that with minimum down it carries up here for around 100 bucks a month plus taxes of course. Might be worth a look, although the one memory I have of the old Micra is not a pleasant one. I went from the airport to the client site and called the rental guy to bring me a new vehicle pronto. Not what I needed for the Northern Winter at the time.

post #6021 of 7369
The US never had the Micra/March. I guess Nissan figured Americans wouldn't buy it. However, that seems to have changed, and now we have the Versa Note, which seems to be approximately the same class of car. Around here, the sticker on a new one is right at $15K. The Versa Sedan is actually a bit cheaper at ~$13K.
post #6022 of 7369
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

The US never had the Micra/March. I guess Nissan figured Americans wouldn't buy it. However, that seems to have changed, and now we have the Versa Note, which seems to be approximately the same class of car. Around here, the sticker on a new one is right at $15K. The Versa Sedan is actually a bit cheaper at ~$13K.


Wow you mean we actually have something here cheaper than the US?

 

http://www.nissan.ca/all-new-micra/en/

post #6023 of 7369
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hutnicks View Post
 


Wow you mean we actually have something here cheaper than the US?

 

http://www.nissan.ca/all-new-micra/en/

 

He was talking about the Versa/Versa Note, which is a different class

post #6024 of 7369
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hutnicks View Post
 


Wow you mean we actually have something here cheaper than the US?


Yes, that's true. The Micra has never been a U.S. product, making the Versa the lowest on Nissan's totem pole.

post #6025 of 7369
Thread Starter 
10K for that Corvair? Are they nuts? blink.gif It may be worth half that, if you want a project car to work on during the weekends, but having only 80hp would be really frustrating. Talk about not being able to pull a string out of a cat's backside, you'd be driving everywhere with your right foot welded to the floor. Geez. They really need forced induction to make them perform at all and truthfully 150hp, like what you'd get out of a spyder or corsa, should be the baseline. Fortunately, those are still great values. This looks like a great resto candidate.
post #6026 of 7369
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magick Man View Post

Fortunately, those are still great values. This looks like a great resto candidate.

That's not even that bad as a runabout driver, actually.

post #6027 of 7369
As I have been shopping for cheap cars, I have noticed that the larger the car dealer, the more expensive the used cars. That doesn't make sense to me. You would think that if you had a big dealership that sells new cars, takes in a bunch of trade-ins and has a huge lot of used cars, you would be able to have volume on your side. But that doesn't seem to be the case. If you want a cheap car, you need to visit the small used car lots, not big lots.

I have also been to a few dealers that advertise a cheap car, then when I went to see the car, I was told "we can't sell that car, it is going to the wholesaler". The salesman never says why - they just say "the shop found something so it's being sent to the wholesaler."

If a car goes to the wholesaler, I assume it shows back up at one of the smaller car dealers somewhere in the country. So, the big dealer would rather dump a car off than sell it to me? Then the car goes through a wholesaler, which adds cost, then to a small dealer, which adds cost, then it gets sold to a customer like me? The economics of this business model baffles me...

Someday I suspect car dealers will go the way of brick & mortar bookstores, music stores and electronics stores. The car manufacturers will eliminate the dealerships and either build a true internet-direct model, or the dealers will be replaced with an Amazon type of model. The auto industry just seems ripe for an elimination of all the markups in the supply chain. I know there are buying services that are pretty close to this - but a true internet-direct model has yet to be tried - and I think it is time. I'm tired of paying for the car lot and the sleazy salesmen.
post #6028 of 7369
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

As I have been shopping for cheap cars, I have noticed that the larger the car dealer, the more expensive the used cars. That doesn't make sense to me. You would think that if you had a big dealership that sells new cars, takes in a bunch of trade-ins and has a huge lot of used cars, you would be able to have volume on your side. But that doesn't seem to be the case. If you want a cheap car, you need to visit the small used car lots, not big lots.

I have also been to a few dealers that advertise a cheap car, then when I went to see the car, I was told "we can't sell that car, it is going to the wholesaler". The salesman never says why - they just say "the shop found something so it's being sent to the wholesaler."

If a car goes to the wholesaler, I assume it shows back up at one of the smaller car dealers somewhere in the country. So, the big dealer would rather dump a car off than sell it to me? Then the car goes through a wholesaler, which adds cost, then to a small dealer, which adds cost, then it gets sold to a customer like me? The economics of this business model baffles me...

Someday I suspect car dealers will go the way of brick & mortar bookstores, music stores and electronics stores. The car manufacturers will eliminate the dealerships and either build a true internet-direct model, or the dealers will be replaced with an Amazon type of model. The auto industry just seems ripe for an elimination of all the markups in the supply chain. I know there are buying services that are pretty close to this - but a true internet-direct model has yet to be tried - and I think it is time. I'm tired of paying for the car lot and the sleazy salesmen.

What about private sale? 

post #6029 of 7369

About the Veyron, 2-3 years ago it was still my dream car (hence my terrible name) but in that period 1000 bhp just does not seem that impressive anymore.....

post #6030 of 7369
Sure - I'm looking at private sales too. I'm just trying to figure out why the dealer business model works the way it does. Every day, cars are being traded into dealerships, and the majority of those cars get put on trucks and shipped 500-1000 miles away to a wholesale auction. The used cars actually sold on that same dealer's lot are also purchased at auction and shipped back to the dealer. The whole process just seems silly.

It reminds me of the soda pop industry. They don't ship bottles of Coke & Pepsi around the world. You can get water anywhere in the world where people that drink soda pop actually live. So, they build local bottling plants that use local water, and they then only need to ship the syrup to the bottling plant. It's a lot cheaper to ship just the syrup for 100K gallons of soda then it is to ship 100K gallons of soda. I find it hard to believe that shipping 1.5 tons of car several thousand miles and then selling it for a few hundred dollars of net profit is the best business model.
Edited by billybob_jcv - 2/23/14 at 9:16pm
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