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An audiophile and petrolhead's journal: Buckle up! - Page 343

post #5131 of 7053
Thread Starter 
Yeah, you have to grow used to the sound of the engine near redline, and the feel of the torque band (which will steeply drop off after the HP peak). After a few times out you can estimate, within few hundred rpms, where the engine is in the rev range, just by sound and feel.

That was an NSX prototype/demonstrator, so it's likely there was no limiter. The limiter in the production cars is extremely conservative. That 6 will easily give another 500 rpms above where the factory set it (8200), but that's Honda for you, they take longterm reliability very seriously. Unlike Alfa or Ferrari, who would have set it at 8700 and shipped it out the door, while handling you a much more strict service schedule. That extra 500 revs is 40 more hp at the top end, without a severe risk of causing any extra appreciable wear or risk of damage, so long as you're rigorous with maintenance and don't flog it like that all the time.
post #5132 of 7053
Yeah - I figured as much - but that takes a whole lot more practice with the specific car than I have put in... smily_headphones1.gif
post #5133 of 7053
Hey Magick /billybob, OT but what are your views on the TPP.
I am actually looking for a non biased source to get a better view of the agreement. Any links would be greatly appreciateded as I can't really make much sense of American media and who favours whom.
post #5134 of 7053
lol - if the rest of the USA is like me, they have never heard of the TPP - I had to google it... redface.gif

I think you will find that in the USA, these sort of agreements matter a great deal to certain union groups that scream "They took our jobs!" and to the corporate fatcats that want to avoid tariffs and lower costs - but the vast unwashed majority couldn't care less. We believe that in general, for most items, we pay the least for the best quality of any country in the world. Sure, certain electronics might be cheaper in Asia, but we have full manufacturer support and distribution to every Walmart, Costco & online superstore. We're the "land of plenty" - we're the consumers for the rest of the world. We assume we can get anything and that the rest of the countries are going to figure out a way to supply to us. If it's not coming from one country, it will come from another - but it *will* come. This is probably going to sound jingoistic to my non-American friends, but I'm just telling you what I observe in my neighbors and co-workers.

The average American (a huge generalization) also believes that ANY trade agreement, of any kind, will cost Americans jobs and will also be primarily funded by US taxpayer dollars. It doesn't matter what the truth is for this specific agreement - the vast majority of people won't bother finding out about it - but they will still believe it is bad for America. Now, with that said, a large percentage might *still* vote for it - *if* they believe it will mean they can buy items they want for less money. This may not make sense - but Americans have a unique ability to believe something would be bad for America, but good for *them* personally - and in that situation, the selfish side often (but not always) prevails.

Being in Southern California, I had a front row seat to a previous example of a similar situation - NAFTA. After much gnashing of teeth and arguments on both sides about loss of jobs vs greater availability of low-cost goods and the improvement of non-American countries being good for Americans - the result is that today, the average American has no idea what effect NAFTA has had on them - or whether there HAS been any effect. There probably have been many changes that affect them - but the average American is completely oblivious to them.

post #5135 of 7053
The reason for concern is that it wants to export American style laws and regulations to other countries. Corporations will be able to challenge foreign country laws in their own courts. Walmart could challenge AU minimum wage laws and say that they only want to pay $7.25 instead of the $16 or so.

Mind you, we have a great standard of living and very low poverty . Melbourne has been rated as the top in the whole world. No full time minimum wage worker needs any Government assistance at all.
post #5136 of 7053
Well see - there you go - we can't have any of that! Everyone should be equally as miserable. If one area of the world were allowed to become better, the rest of the world would naturally feel compelled to go there and screw it up.
post #5137 of 7053
I just hope we don't get a serving of American style Freedom(tm).
post #5138 of 7053
When I was in Australia a few years ago, I was struck by the local-biases I seemed to see everywhere. As an example, I wasn't allowed to bring a sealed package of beef jerky into the country. And not just at Customs - in many placed it seemed very obvious that products from outside Australia were strongly discouraged.

I think "freedom" is a very local and personal concept.

BTW - I loved Melbourne! We had a great time - even though it was raining. The Great Ocean Road really reminded me of the California coast - there were spots we stopped that looked EXACTLY like spots I am very familiar with along the Central Coast of California - except without the Koalas! smily_headphones1.gif
post #5139 of 7053
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

Well see - there you go - we can't have any of that! Everyone should be equally as miserable. If one area of the world were allowed to become better, the rest of the world would naturally feel compelled to go there and screw it up.


Anyone have a copy of the wikileaks docs on that one?

 

There are a lot of potential dangers in having this kind of agreement expand as rapidly as it has. (Not the least of which is having the Targets and Walmarts being able to foist their brand of economics on other countries as mentioned above)  Leveling playing fields is really contrary to providing best pricing / quality to the consumer. I cannot see all of a sudden US or Canadian companies dropping their shipping charges to meet those of the far east counterparts, can you?

 

 Then, you get into the intellectual property arguments and all hell breaks loose.

 

These agreements are being used as a "prestige" kaffeklatch for emergent nations and there is a certain amount of terror that incites within me.

 

The East Asia Co Prosperity Sphere actually sprang into existance in spite of the second world war and now the jostling for the good seats is begining.

 

NAFTA :rolleyes: How are you enjoying our softwood lumber Billybob? we can't even buy it here anymore.

post #5140 of 7053
Probably as much as I am enjoying the cheap avocados from Michoacan instead of the avocados grown in my own county. rolleyes.gif
post #5141 of 7053
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

When I was in Australia a few years ago, I was struck by the local-biases I seemed to see everywhere. As an example, I wasn't allowed to bring a sealed package of beef jerky into the country. And not just at Customs - in many placed it seemed very obvious that products from outside Australia were strongly discouraged.

I think "freedom" is a very local and personal concept.

BTW - I loved Melbourne! We had a great time - even though it was raining. The Great Ocean Road really reminded me of the California coast - there were spots we stopped that looked EXACTLY like spots I am very familiar with along the Central Coast of California - except without the Koalas! smily_headphones1.gif


We love you billybob:p but the Customs are very strict when it comes to food and other produce. Has to do with contamination of air/soil/water etc to prevent a bird-flu/mad cow kinda epidemic.

 

Supermarkets here advertise that 98 or more % of their food is Australian made as the Govt has regulations to prevent a runaway takeover by overseas food firms

 

and to ensure food quality standards are maintained. Used to work as a Supermarket Manager while in University and they have very strict standards.

 

I even had to clean my shoes for dust and dirt before boarding my flight back to Melbourne from India. Your $500 Kenneth Cole,s go straight in an incinerator otherwise:D

 

Since we are so isolated, we have to be careful to prevent pests and organisms from other places breeding and creating havoc.

 

The cane toad and the carp being the biggest of them especially when they breed a million eggs like the Turkish Carp and destroy fisheries.

 

AN example of the strict food regulations:

 

http://www.daff.gov.au/animal-plant-health/welfare/export-trade/gov-response-to-cattle-mistreatment-in-indonesia

post #5142 of 7053

Is this the Doha Round? 

post #5143 of 7053

Nope, its in Singapore.

post #5144 of 7053

ok, I know this comes a little late in the conversation. to me the nsx was the best sports car ever built. by the time my nsx was two years old it had over 40k miles. my 599 gto  saw it's second summer and had less than 9k miles. the nsx was meant to be driven. something must be said that that car is still over 40 grand way used. also I wanted to say the mustang is not just a $25k car. if drag racing is your thing the Shelby gt is pretty much unmatched stock imo. I will be getting the new nsx but by all accounts it is not the same thing as the old one.

post #5145 of 7053
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

Combine that with the other 53 things you need to think about and do as you enter and exit a turn, and I'm flailing like a Chimpanzee in an ice water jacuzzi. tongue.gif

That's quite a colorful simile.

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