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An audiophile and petrolhead's journal: Buckle up! - Page 318

post #4756 of 7053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hutnicks View Post
 


http://ceramicrotaryengines.com/

Quote:
Rotary engines have fewer moving parts than reciprocating engines. A high torque engine, rotary engines also run more smoothly. 

 

Not sure I buy the highlighted phrase, without forced induction anyways.

post #4757 of 7053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Achmedisdead View Post
 

 

Not sure I buy the highlighted phrase, without forced induction anyways.


Me either.  Two thinks the wankel lacks are engine braking and torque.

post #4758 of 7053
I had a rotary for many years. It wasn't high torque. Free-revving, yes, but not a huge amount of low-end grunt. More smoothly, yeah - I guess - there's certainly no big radical cam thrashing about.
post #4759 of 7053

Magick, this was probably addressed a long time ago (before I ever joined the thread), but is your shop at your house or is it off-site?

post #4760 of 7053
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssrock64 View Post

Magick, this was probably addressed a long time ago (before I ever joined the thread), but is your shop at your house or is it off-site?

It's ~5 miles from me, as the crow flies. My garage here at home doesn't have nearly enough room to do any serious work.
post #4761 of 7053

I used to have some Mopar nut drag-racer neighbors with a tiny house and a huge pole barn next door that dwarfed anything in the neighborhood, where they did all their tinkering. Even then, they could only own five cars at a time. It's not hard to get pure garage space, but to have that space be a fully-functioning shop is a different matter.

 

The Shelby shop I used to work at was transitioning to a new place behind my boss's new house, and he had almost a dozen garage stalls installed throughout his house so we could move projects between the shop building and storage as needed.

post #4762 of 7053
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssrock64 View Post

I used to have some Mopar nut drag-racer neighbors with a tiny house and a huge pole barn next door that dwarfed anything in the neighborhood, where they did all their tinkering. Even then, they could only own five cars at a time. It's not hard to get pure garage space, but to have that space be a fully-functioning shop is a different matter.

The Shelby shop I used to work at was transitioning to a new place behind my boss's new house, and he had almost a dozen garage stalls installed throughout his house so we could move projects between the shop building and storage as needed.

Yeah, it's true, lifts, stands, and tools take up a large amount of space, it's isn't just the cars themselves. Plus we have full part fabrication facilities now (forge, molds, and kiln), so we can do almost everything, because we hate sending things off. It's cool, we can print a part from someone else's CAD model, make a mold, and pour it, without ever having the original part onhand. That's how we made the Miura rear-view mirror "pods". cool.gif
post #4763 of 7053
It might not be hard to get garage space in Alabama & Tennessee, but it's a bit more difficult in a metro area like LA, where homes barely have a backyard big enough for a ****zu to do his business.

So, I'm traveling this week, and this time my rental car is a Camry. I have not driven a Camry in over 5 years and I thought it might be nice to see what Toyota was up to.

The Camry has always been a pretty bland car - but I can now report that Toyota has successfully turned the Camry into your grandfather's Buick. I can't think of a single thing to say about this car. Absolutely everything about it is simply "good". Not bad, not great - just good. Ward Cleaver would drive a Camry. So would Mary Richards and Laura Petrie.
post #4764 of 7053
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

It might not be hard to get garage space in Alabama & Tennessee, but it's a bit more difficult in a metro area like LA, where homes barely have a backyard big enough for a ****zu to do his business.

So, I'm traveling this week, and this time my rental car is a Camry. I have not driven a Camry in over 5 years and I thought it might be nice to see what Toyota was up to.

The Camry has always been a pretty bland car - but I can now report that Toyota has successfully turned the Camry into your grandfather's Buick. I can't think of a single thing to say about this car. Absolutely everything about it is simply "good". Not bad, not great - just good. Ward Cleaver would drive a Camry. So would Mary Richards and Laura Petrie.


Yeah but Laura would've looked smoking hot driving it:wink_face:

post #4765 of 7053
Thread Starter 
So I popped into the garage tonight, even though I felt like ****, just to get out of the house for a little while. I was tired of smelling poop and vomit, which is all I've been producing for the last 24 hours. tongue.gif And my Zonda was in pieces all over the place.

"WTF?!"
"Oh, well, we're working on the chassis problem, and figuring out why it keeps breaking everywhere."
"And?"
"Every bolt connecting the tub to the support frame is over-tightened, by 25lbs. It's like someone had their air wrench set too high when they put it together."
"That would cause what we've seen?"
"Oh yeah, if it's too rigid, because the titanium fittings are too tight, the aluminum frame pieces will snap. There was too much tension and no give, and the softest metal took the abuse."
"So we'll now be able to drive it without everything breaking?"
"Oh hell yeah, it'll feel completely different now too, less twitchy and jarring."

I'm so happy, for months now I've felt like I wasted money buying that thing. Really annoys me that Pagani didn't QC the problem at the factory, but I guess that's the risk with an all-handbuilt car.
Edited by Magick Man - 10/21/13 at 9:34pm
post #4766 of 7053
Too bad it didn't come with a "Built by Giusseppe" sticker so you could track him down and kick him in the nuts.
post #4767 of 7053
Thread Starter 
No doubt, a**hole. rolleyes.gif I'm no engineer, but it all makes sense to me. Oh well, at least it's good news.
post #4768 of 7053

I have to wonder if any others came out of the factory with the same issue.

post #4769 of 7053
Thread Starter 
With machine-built, assembly line cars you get consistency, even with something like the Ferrari 458 or McLaren 12C, you lose that with small batch exotics. The gain, however, is generally an amazing level of attention to detail and superior fit and finish. And, for good or ill, they're quirky. All hand-built cars I've driven have personalities, one K'segg within the same model range will drive differently than another, the same goes for Pagani and all the other boutique marques, even flagship Ferraris, since they're built one at a time.
post #4770 of 7053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magick Man View Post

With machine-built, assembly line cars you get consistency, even with something like the Ferrari 458 or McLaren 12C, you lose that with small batch exotics. The gain, however, is generally an amazing level of attention to detail and superior fit and finish. And, for good or ill, they're quirky. All hand-built cars I've driven have personalities, one K'segg within the same model range will drive differently than another, the same goes for Pagani and all the other boutique marques, even flagship Ferraris, since they're built one at a time.


That's rather a non sequitor .

 

The point I was trying to make is that if the car was consistently assembled with a 25ft/lb over torquing, there is an issue at the factory. One or two fittings can be put down to anomalous human failure whereas the entire chassis/suspension smacks of an error of larger proportions. That type of error would have moved on to the next thing being assembled in the shop.

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