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An audiophile and petrolhead's journal: Buckle up! - Page 297

post #4441 of 6609

That's a beauty! And better than the Dukes' car.....didn't they drive an automatic? 

post #4442 of 6609

Redneck Heaven!

 

Frame flex, body roll. Ah the good ol days.

 

Now if y'all could dig yerself up a Superbird...

post #4443 of 6609
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hutnicks View Post

Redneck Heaven!

Frame flex, body roll. Ah the good ol days.

Now if y'all could dig yerself up a Superbird...

Jessica Simpson and Catherine Bach are still the two best things that ever happened to shorts (and bikinis too, for that matter).
Quote:
Originally Posted by Achmedisdead View Post

That's a beauty! And better than the Dukes' car.....didn't they drive an automatic? 

Yeah, I don't believe Wopat could drive a stick very well, and those stunts were a lot harder to perform with a manual, so the stunt drivers probably preferred a slush box too. What I didn't know was they destroyed over 240 `68 and `69 Chargers to film that show. redface.gif That is a gorgeous build, for sure.
Edited by Magick Man - 9/17/13 at 2:58pm
post #4444 of 6609
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magick Man View Post


Jessica Simpson and Catherine Bach are still the two best things that ever happened to shorts (and bikinis too, for that matter).
Yeah, I don't believe Wopat could drive a stick very well, and those stunts were a lot harder to perform with a manual, so the stunt drivers probably preferred a slush box too. What I didn't know was they destroyed over 240 `68 and `69 Chargers to film that show. redface.gif That is a gorgeous build, for sure.

A fair amount of that 240 were not actually Chargers.

post #4445 of 6609
I have read that TV & movie stunts take a lot of liberties with the cars. They will crash one car's rear end, and another car's front end, then cut both cars in half and create a third car out of the "good" halves. They are also not above making fiberglass & foam versions of the cars and creating shells that can be put over other cars. I will never forget driving past a location that was often used by crews to shoot train station scenes. It was a plywood mock-up of a small train station on an abandoned siding. A handful of guys were moving an entire train car - by picking it up and walking it sideways! It must have been made of papier-mache or foam - but it looked amazingly REAL, and these guys picked-up each corner like it weighed nothing - which I'm sure was close to true!

Many years ago, I used to occasionally see some of the classic shows being filmed in the town where I worked: A-Team, Air Wolf, CHiPs, etc. It was annoying when they would close off a street, but it was cool to see the A-Team van sitting in a parking lot. biggrin.gif
post #4446 of 6609
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

I have read that TV & movie stunts take a lot of liberties with the cars. They will crash one car's rear end, and another car's front end, then cut both cars in half and create a third car out of the "good" halves. They are also not above making fiberglass & foam versions of the cars and creating shells that can be put over other cars. I will never forget driving past a location that was often used by crews to shoot train station scenes. It was a plywood mock-up of a small train station on an abandoned siding. A handful of guys were moving an entire train car - by picking it up and walking it sideways! It must have been made of papier-mache or foam - but it looked amazingly REAL, and these guys picked-up each corner like it weighed nothing - which I'm sure was close to true!

Many years ago, I used to occasionally see some of the classic shows being filmed in the town where I worked: A-Team, Air Wolf, CHiPs, etc. It was annoying when they would close off a street, but it was cool to see the A-Team van sitting in a parking lot. biggrin.gif

A fair amount of those were actually Coronets and Plymouth Road Runners dressed out to appear as chargers. As you mention movie magic is all illusion. Train car was probably glass. In the Commentary on the Catch 22 DVD they mention one day the local Italian folk being freaked out when a guy walked over to one of the Sherman Tanks, picked it up put it on his back and walked off down the road.

post #4447 of 6609
Thread Starter 
I'd remembered reading on Wikipedia that they were all Chargers...
Quote:
Although the estimated number of General Lees used varies from different sources, according to Ben Jones ("Cooter" in the show), as well as builders involved with the show, 256 General Lees were used to film the series. Others claim about 321 were used in the series. Approximately seventeen still exist in various states of repair. On average, more than one General Lee was used up per show. When filming a jump, anywhere from 500 to 1,000 pounds of sand bags or concrete ballast was placed in the trunk to prevent the car from nosing over. Later in the series the mechanics would raise the front end of the car to keep it from scraping against the ramp causing it to lose speed, thereby providing a cushion for the driver upon landing. Stunt drivers report enjoying the flights but hating the landings. Despite the ballast, the landing attitude of the car was somewhat unpredictable, resulting in moderate to extremely violent forces, depending on how it landed. On many of the jumps the cars bent upon impact. All cars used in large jumps were immediately retired due to structural damage.

From 1979 to 1985, 1968 and 1969 model-year Chargers were sourced and converted to General Lee specifications. Despite popular belief, no 1970 models were used, according to all builders involved over the years. Obtaining cars was not a problem until later years. By that time, the car was the star of the show and Warner Brothers moved building of the cars in house to keep the cars consistent in appearance. Later in the show's run, when it got too hard and/or expensive to continue procuring more Chargers, the producers started using more 'jump footage' from previous episodes. In the final season radio-controlled miniatures were occasionally used to the chagrin of several cast members.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Lee_(car)

However, there are no references in the article... I hate that. mad.gif
post #4448 of 6609
post #4449 of 6609
Quote:
Originally Posted by gikigill View Post

Looking for a good home:

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/for-sale-three-nasa-shuttle-launch-platforms--collection-only-8780609.html

What the hell??????!!!!!!

That makes me really sad. redface.gif I think abandoning space is a huge step backward for the human species. We no longer have the will & vision to look outward. We now look only inward at our petty problems. We moan and whimper, waiting for someone else to make things "better". Instead of working together to move forward in great leaps, we sit in the dark feeding on each other.

Adapting a saying I heard long ago: When we depend on the heroic efforts of individuals to succeed, we are doomed.

It should not take an Einstein or Tesla to make progress - we can accomplish much more collectively than any one genius can do in their lifetime. When the genius does appear - we need to be in the best possible position to take advantage of that genius - because they are exceedingly rare.

/end soapbox rant
post #4450 of 6609
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post


That makes me really sad. redface.gif I think abandoning space is a huge step backward for the human species. We no longer have the will & vision to look outward. We now look only inward at our petty problems. We moan and whimper, waiting for someone else to make things "better". Instead of working together to move forward in great leaps, we sit in the dark feeding on each other.

Adapting a saying I heard long ago: When we depend on the heroic efforts of individuals to succeed, we are doomed.

It should not take an Einstein or Tesla to make progress - we can accomplish much more collectively than any one genius can do in their lifetime. When the genius does appear - we need to be in the best possible position to take advantage of that genius - because they are exceedingly rare.

/end soapbox rant

 

I can't even play a league of legend game without some abusive person insulting me, how will the whole of mankind work together when a team can't even work together in a game 

:(

post #4451 of 6609
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post


That makes me really sad. redface.gif I think abandoning space is a huge step backward for the human species. We no longer have the will & vision to look outward. We now look only inward at our petty problems. We moan and whimper, waiting for someone else to make things "better". Instead of working together to move forward in great leaps, we sit in the dark feeding on each other.

Adapting a saying I heard long ago: When we depend on the heroic efforts of individuals to succeed, we are doomed.

It should not take an Einstein or Tesla to make progress - we can accomplish much more collectively than any one genius can do in their lifetime. When the genius does appear - we need to be in the best possible position to take advantage of that genius - because they are exceedingly rare.

/end soapbox rant

Counterpoint:

 

It does in fact take an Einstein or Tesla to accomplish great things. IQ is not a collective system. If it were you could put 10 morons in a room and create great things. The issue at hand here is a global cultural issue whereby the measure of success is the accumulation of things. Be it money or items , we are a culture of accumulation. Our value systems have decayed to the point where breakthrough discoveries are perceived as hum drum and not in vogue. We do not get Einsteins and Teslas anymore simply because we are not breeding them culturally. We work to the lowest common denominator and that is an environment that stifles emergent genius in any form. When it does appear it applies itself to nebulous pursuits of little consequence to mankind and we wind up hero worshiping the guy who creates facebook. The team who created the HIV vaccine is completely unknown to the masses.

 

Genius is not exceedingly rare, rather it is increasingly rare. Stop for a moment an put yourself in the shoes of the child growing up in today's culture. Think of the constant input and stimuli they are surrounded with. How are we developing skills in our young to cope with the enormous avalanche of purely trivial information they have no use for. What are we doing to allow them to make sound judgements between the wheat and the chaff? How in hell do we expect genius to emerge in a global society where everyone from the age of 10 and up cannot move forward until they tweet about their latest bowel movement.

 

Back to IT 101. Data by definition is meaningless information. We are now a data driven society. One who has lost the ability to provide it's young with the codex to make sense of it all.

 

Amusing ourselves to Death raised to the power of 10.

post #4452 of 6609
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hutnicks View Post

Counterpoint:

It does in fact take an Einstein or Tesla to accomplish great things. IQ is not a collective system. If it were you could put 10 morons in a room and create great things. The issue at hand here is a global cultural issue whereby the measure of success is the accumulation of things. Be it money or items , we are a culture of accumulation. Our value systems have decayed to the point where breakthrough discoveries are perceived as hum drum and not in vogue. We do not get Einsteins and Teslas anymore simply because we are not breeding them culturally. We work to the lowest common denominator and that is an environment that stifles emergent genius in any form. When it does appear it applies itself to nebulous pursuits of little consequence to mankind and we wind up hero worshiping the guy who creates facebook. The team who created the HIV vaccine is completely unknown to the masses.

Genius is not exceedingly rare, rather it is increasingly rare. Stop for a moment an put yourself in the shoes of the child growing up in today's culture. Think of the constant input and stimuli they are surrounded with. How are we developing skills in our young to cope with the enormous avalanche of purely trivial information they have no use for. What are we doing to allow them to make sound judgements between the wheat and the chaff? How in hell do we expect genius to emerge in a global society where everyone from the age of 10 and up cannot move forward until they tweet about their latest bowel movement.

Back to IT 101. Data by definition is meaningless information. We are now a data driven society. One who has lost the ability to provide it's young with the codex to make sense of it all.

Amusing ourselves to Death raised to the power of 10.

Counter-Counterpoint:

We need to define "Great Things" and "Genius", and we also need to separate ideas from accomplishments. Robert Goddard didn't invent the rocket, he didn't even invent the idea of a liquid-fueled rocket. He was the first to successfully get a liquid-fuel rocket off the ground. Like many before and after him, Goddard's great contributions were not from genius insight, they were from diligent & thorough understanding of the fundamentals. His earlier work on maximizing exhaust velocities using reducing & expanding nozzles was arguably more important to getting man in space than his 1926 rocket launch. The Wright brothers are another perfect example of this - their great contribution, a successful manned flight, came not from a great leap of genius, but from systematic and diligent study and test of the fundamentals of fluid dynamics laid down by Prandtl & Bernoulli, and also from studying and confirming the practical work done by their contemporaries like Chanute & Langley. In fact, in the world of aerospace, it's hard to find people that would be considered true "genius" that have made great leaps. Aerospace has been driven primarily by smart people that are also very diligent - but not considered geniuses. I didn't say morons could do great things. I am saying that the lone genius won't get the job done - and we shouldn't depend on them. 10 morons may manage to light themselves on fire, but 10 smart people all working together diligently CAN accomplish some pretty darn amazing things - like the team that developed the HIV vaccine.

There's no argument from me that the value judgments of our society are seriously f'd-up. The example I have always used is from a lecture I sat through as a Freshman engineering student. The professor said that engineers are the stupidest people on the planet. Engineering is not a career - it is a Holy Calling. Most of the best engineers would be engineers even if they weren't being paid - that's how much they LOVE being engineers (I have actually seen this first hand). Now contrast this with lawyers & accountants. They hate their jobs so much that you have to pay them for EVERY MINUTE you make them do their job - you even have to pay them if they are simply talking to you on the phone about their job! He went on to say that if people were paid based on their contribution to society, engineers & scientists would make as much or more than surgeons. Accountants and lawyers would be making minimum wage... tongue.gif

I blame nearly all ills in the world on the corporate Marketing departments. They are the ones creating all the useless, uncorrelated data in the world. As an example, just today I was sent an email by our VP of Marketing. They are investigating the use of "gamification" in their collection of lead data and customer satisfaction data. Will creating virtual games and giving out virtual awards provide us more useful data? I have no idea. What I do know is that it will be yet another data interface between some 3rd party analytics tool and our CRM system, and it will be more tables and charts that someone will want to look at.
post #4453 of 6609
Thread Starter 
The modern issue is money, the right people don't have enough of it. In our capitalist society, it's required to make anything work. I'm not talking about little "m" money, like regular folks have (I'm including myself there), I mean capital "M" money, where you need to be in control of 11 figures just to see what's going on, let alone play. Despite being a devout Libertarian, even I know that space exploration is dead if the corporations alone are going to fund it (unless they find out there's intelligent life in Europa, then they'll be there in 7 years to sell them Coke and iPhones).

There are geniuses and visionaries in the upper ranks, but there simply aren't enough Elon Musks to go around.
post #4454 of 6609
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magick Man View Post

The modern issue is money, the right people don't have enough of it. In our capitalist society, it's required to make anything work. I'm not talking about little "m" money, like regular folks have (I'm including myself there), I mean capital "M" money, where you need to be in control of 11 figures just to see what's going on, let alone play. Despite being a devout Libertarian, even I know that space exploration is dead if the corporations alone are going to fund it (unless they find out there's intelligent life in Europa, then they'll be there in 7 years to sell them Coke and iPhones).

There are geniuses and visionaries in the upper ranks, but there simply aren't enough Elon Musks to go around.

Just watched Europa Report did you? How many tentacles can you hold a Red Bull in?

 

I love the use of the word control. Because it really is not how much money you may have but how much you indeed can control that has an effect. I'm still a little more concerned over the global distribution of money right now than most folks are and really am alarmed at how little intelligence is being applied into tracking that distribution. Somewhere along the line there seems to have been a large self imposed blind spot erected where nobody actually wants to know the whole picture here. When the worlds governments have that kind of fear, where the hell does that leave us?

post #4455 of 6609
As an accountant and someone who deals with lawyers all the time, don't come running when you are being investigated by the IRS or facing charges of a criminal nature. Deal with them yourselves and report back although I agree that lawyers do get paid a lot.
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