Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Members' Lounge (General Discussion) › An audiophile and petrolhead's journal: Buckle up!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

An audiophile and petrolhead's journal: Buckle up! - Page 296

post #4426 of 7158
Thread Starter 
If this were in the States, I'd bid on it. http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Niki-Laudas-Ferrari-team-van-from-Ron-Howards-movie-Rush-with-James-Hunt-/190899295453 Would make an awesome track support van, for tires and parts.


Processed By eBay with ImageMagick, R1.1.1.M1
post #4427 of 7158
Every time I see a SmartCar on the freeway, they look very "unsettled" (I like that word!) - they look like they really, really would prefer to not be going that fast or have cars weighing 3-4X (or more) what they do whizzing around them.

You also shouldn't forget this:
Quote:
However, in an April 2009 40 mph frontal offset crash test between a Fortwo and a Mercedes C class, "the Smart went air- borne and turned around 450 degrees" causing "extensive intrusion into the space around the dummy from head to feet". The IIHS rated the Smart Fortwo "Poor," noting that "Multiple injuries, including to the head, would be likely for a real-world driver of a Smart in a similar collision."
post #4428 of 7158
Apparently, while we have been calmly listening to music and discussing the best way for Magick to spend his money, there are people out there taking a different hobby to a new level of insanity that makes head-fi seem like a church social.



I had no idea these airsoft guys had taken it to such wild levels. There are videos of guys that have built actual tanks with air-powered cannons and howitzers that shoot 250+ yards. The "round" they fire is a Nerf vortex football that whistles as they come inbound. They even use electric airsoft miniguns attached to helicopters for air support!! I guess I shouldn't be surprised - as usual, humans take everything to a nucking futs level. biggrin.gif
Edited by billybob_jcv - 9/15/13 at 9:05pm
post #4429 of 7158
Thread Starter 
eek.gif That's come a long way from our paintball days, but I bet when we got shot it hurt a lot more. That looks like it works via the honor system to determine if you've been "wounded", whereas we'd be covered in paint by the end of the day. biggrin.gif


There's a case for buying via auctions. With only 3 exceptions, all the cars I've bought from auction houses (not counting repo auctions) have been roadworthy and have required only minimal attention to get them to where I'd like for them to be. On the other hand, with private sellers and dealers, we've had to really put in the extra work and money to get them up to spec, and sometimes even requiring complete tear-downs and rebuilds. I figured it out, and although I'm paying 22% more for a car from Mecum, for example, I'm paying half as much to restore it once it arrives. This breaks down to a wash in terms of money, but it backs my guys up having to do extensive work, keeping them from other projects. Old European cars further skew the disparity, costing 3-5x more to restore than their domestic counterparts, due to rarity of replacement parts and insane dealer markup (and my refusal to use cheap aftermarket replacements). So, I've determined that:

  • Buying from Mecum is a good thing, as long as they have what I want. Dana Mecum is a man of integrity and won't lie to you.
  • Buying from Gooding is still too expensive, unless I can keep the bidding from getting crazy, but they do a good job of vetting the cars.
  • RM auctions are kind of shady but can be a great deal if you know what you're buying.
  • Don't buy from Barrett Jackson.
  • Russo and Steele seem to be okay for the most part, but there is a "whiff" of RM shadiness to them.
  • Private sellers are the worst and few have any integrity at all, if you can't inspect the car thoroughly before you buy it, assume the worst.
  • Dealers are pot luck, some are decent, some aren't, but that goes without saying. Check their rating, if they have one, and if you insist on a 3rd party inspection and they balk, walk away (that goes for private sellers too).

Most of it comes down to disclosure. Billy pointed out an issue with an M3 Mecum had listed, wondering why it didn't have more details about the car's condition, beyond it saying the car had a rebuilt title. Always assume the worst on those, especially when they're sold at No Reserve. If the guy could get more for it via a private sale, he would, E36 M3s aren't a rare commodity but if they're in even fair condition they'll sell quickly because most have been ragged out horribly. I did get on to them for not showing interior photos of that car, and for not giving more details (it was presented more completely in the Gold member section but not in the public listing). Frankly, it was a car that Mecum shouldn't have sold at one of their auctions, and they admitted that, it was below their standards. At least the buyer didn't get screwed.

All restomods are a labor of love, or outright insanity, with few exceptions you will not get your money back from paying to have them done. Buying them after they're done and the owner gets tired of them, however, is usually smart. You'll generally pay half as much for a restomod as it cost to build, because they simply aren't that collectible. For muscle cars and domestic sports cars, I love them, though. You get the classic look and style, with improved comfort, handling, and reliability. Screw purity, muscle cars are crap to drive, if you have to turn the steering wheel, and about as comfortable as a medieval rack. wink.gif
post #4430 of 7158
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magick Man View Post

eek.gif That's come a long way from our paintball days, but I bet when we got shot it hurt a lot more. That looks like it works via the honor system to determine if you've been "wounded", whereas we'd be covered in paint by the end of the day. biggrin.gif

There's a case for buying via auctions. With only 3 exceptions, all the cars I've bought from auction houses (not counting repo auctions) have been roadworthy and have required only minimal attention to get them to where I'd like for them to be. On the other hand, with private sellers and dealers, we've had to really put in the extra work and money to get them up to spec, and sometimes even requiring complete tear-downs and rebuilds. I figured it out, and although I'm paying 22% more for a car from Mecum, for example, I'm paying half as much to restore it once it arrives. This breaks down to a wash in terms of money, but it backs my guys up having to do extensive work, keeping them from other projects. Old European cars further skew the disparity, costing 3-5x more to restore than their domestic counterparts, due to rarity of replacement parts and insane dealer markup (and my refusal to use cheap aftermarket replacements). So, I've determined that:
 
  • Buying from Mecum is a good thing, as long as they have what I want. Dana Mecum is a man of integrity and won't lie to you.
  • Buying from Gooding is still too expensive, unless I can keep the bidding from getting crazy, but they do a good job of vetting the cars.
  • RM auctions are kind of shady but can be a great deal if you know what you're buying.
  • Don't buy from Barrett Jackson.
  • Russo and Steele seem to be okay for the most part, but there is a "whiff" of RM shadiness to them.
  • Private sellers are the worst and few have any integrity at all, if you can't inspect the car thoroughly before you buy it, assume the worst.
  • Dealers are pot luck, some are decent, some aren't, but that goes without saying. Check their rating, if they have one, and if you insist on a 3rd party inspection and they balk, walk away (that goes for private sellers too).

Most of it comes down to disclosure. Billy pointed out an issue with an M3 Mecum had listed, wondering why it didn't have more details about the car's condition, beyond it saying the car had a rebuilt title. Always assume the worst on those, especially when they're sold at No Reserve. If the guy could get more for it via a private sale, he would, E36 M3s aren't a rare commodity but if they're in even fair condition they'll sell quickly because most have been ragged out horribly. I did get on to them for not showing interior photos of that car, and for not giving more details (it was presented more completely in the Gold member section but not in the public listing). Frankly, it was a car that Mecum shouldn't have sold at one of their auctions, and they admitted that, it was below their standards. At least the buyer didn't get screwed.

All restomods are a labor of love, or outright insanity, with few exceptions you will not get your money back from paying to have them done. Buying them after they're done and the owner gets tired of them, however, is usually smart. You'll generally pay half as much for a restomod as it cost to build, because they simply aren't that collectible. For muscle cars and domestic sports cars, I love them, though. You get the classic look and style, with improved comfort, handling, and reliability. Screw purity, muscle cars are crap to drive, if you have to turn the steering wheel, and about as comfortable as a medieval rack. wink.gif

 

 

Hah before there was paintball we used air rifles and safety matches. You KNEW when you got hit, big time.

 

The whole restomod thing amazes me. When you see an ad saying over 100k invested, you really have to think. A its not an investment it's a hobby and B unless you find your long lost clone out there, nobody really wants YOUR car. It's a very personal thing. These guys should talk to professional home sellers about what having your personality intrude into an item does to it worth.

post #4431 of 7158

Magick, have you ever bought from a Bonham's auction? Aren't they the official partner house of the Quail?

 

I personally prefer Russo and Steele, but they really don't have the variety of content of RM anymore. RM has really done a good job of dominating the big-bucks cars the past five years. However, the Shelby shop always sold through R&S, and we never had issues. The representatives of the house always seemed to genuinely care about the condition and history of the cars we were selling.

 

And yeah, I can confirm that Barret-Jackson is to be avoided at all costs.

post #4432 of 7158
The thing that I keep thinking about buying any classic or exotic car is that you need to not only have the scratch to make the purchase, but you also need to remember to have a reserve of what it might take to make the car right if you do get a problem. The risk is there - especially if you haven't got a shop full of boffins that can make a silk purse out of a sow's ear. Can you imagine the feeling of buying the car of your dreams with your life savings, then finding out that it will take another $xx,000 to actually get what you thought you bought in the first place? If that's money you haven't got to spend, then your only choice is to sell it - probably at a significant loss. It could very well take that dream purchase off the table. Many people have one shot to get something like that right, and if they blow it - it's not coming back. I suppose it's all part of knowing your limitations. I also suspect it's why you see so many people with an old rusty Jag or 'Stang sitting in their garage with old boxes stacked on it. They bought what they could afford, then they found out their dreams were bigger than their pocketbook and/or their skills.


post #4433 of 7158
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

The thing that I keep thinking about buying any classic or exotic car is that you need to not only have the scratch to make the purchase, but you also need to remember to have a reserve of what it might take to make the car right if you do get a problem. The risk is there - especially if you haven't got a shop full of boffins that can make a silk purse out of a sow's ear. Can you imagine the feeling of buying the car of your dreams with your life savings, then finding out that it will take another $xx,000 to actually get what you thought you bought in the first place? If that's money you haven't got to spend, then your only choice is to sell it - probably at a significant loss. It could very well take that dream purchase off the table. Many people have one shot to get something like that right, and if they blow it - it's not coming back. I suppose it's all part of knowing your limitations. I also suspect it's why you see so many people with an old rusty Jag or 'Stang sitting in their garage with old boxes stacked on it. They bought what they could afford, then they found out their dreams were bigger than their pocketbook and/or their skills.

Yeah, I'd never recommend an old Italian to a working man who only wants one car for the weekends. Maybe not even a Brit, either. An older Ferrari, Alfa, or Lanica is a study in service and repair, because they will break. Same goes for "pre-Genesis" English cars, but at least their ownership costs are more reasonable. That's one of the reasons why, in that situation, I'd recommend a nice domestic restomod or one of the Euro/US hybrid builders, like Intermeccanica. You get the gorgeous looks of a Continental thoroughbred with a near-bulletproof running gear from Detroit.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssrock64 View Post

Magick, have you ever bought from a Bonham's auction? Aren't they the official partner house of the Quail?

I believe they only sell cars during Goodwood FoS now. Also, they don't vet any of them, most are little more than rusty sculpture, racers collected for their "patina". That's a whole `nother type of collector, right there. Although I can appreciate an unrestored classic beater, I'd rather buy something that looks more like it did from the factory.
post #4434 of 7158
Thread Starter 
Here's a nugget for the weekend driver, a GTD GT40 replica, w/ 428 CJ & 5-spd, making >600bhp (w/ AC) - $75k OBO.


post #4435 of 7158
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magick Man View Post

Here's a nugget for the weekend driver, a GTD GT40 replica, w/ 428 CJ & 5-spd, making >600bhp (w/ AC) - $75k OBO.


 

*drool* 

:L3000:

post #4436 of 7158
post #4437 of 7158
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magick Man View Post

Here's a nugget for the weekend driver, a GTD GT40 replica, w/ 428 CJ & 5-spd, making >600bhp (w/ AC) - $75k OBO.


 

Surprised you don't have an original at casa Warbucks. Or a T70 MKIIIB Broadley made some damn beautiful cars..

Quote:

Whats with the focus on the entertainment industry?. Probably could have got Kubica to put in an appearance for cheap.

post #4438 of 7158
Quote:

I wish. Jalopnik has such a wide range of car guys as their audience that there's no way you wouldn't have fun at the Film Festival.

 

Magick, didn't you say you're too tall for a GT40?

post #4439 of 7158
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssrock64 View Post

I wish. Jalopnik has such a wide range of car guys as their audience that there's no way you wouldn't have fun at the Film Festival.

Magick, didn't you say you're too tall for a GT40?

Sadly that's correct, I'm too tall, even with a "bubble" door. I've sat in one that been adjusted for taller drivers, and even then it was maddeningly uncomfortable. Clarkson is a smidgen taller than me and he road in such a modded car (a "GT43"), but even then he looked like he'd been poured into it. The modern GT is much better for me, but even in that I'm a little cramped for space.

Speaking of which, the Saleen S7 is "no joy", the pedalbox is so small (due to the intruding wheel well) I can't really fit both of my feet into it while wearing normal shoes. I have to wear my narrow wrestling-style shoes just to drive it at all.
Edited by Magick Man - 9/17/13 at 12:22pm
post #4440 of 7158
Thread Starter 
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Members' Lounge (General Discussion) › An audiophile and petrolhead's journal: Buckle up!