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An audiophile and petrolhead's journal: Buckle up! - Page 249

post #3721 of 9498
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magick Man View Post

A moment of silence for Babs, my wife's cottontail rabbit. I have no idea what happened to her, she was fine when we left for dinner but inexplicably died while we were gone. I put her in a little shoebox and we had a small service then buried her in the flower garden. frown.gif

I suspect foul play...

 

Better luck with the next one! 

post #3722 of 9498
Watching Top Gear Episode 3. They test 3 budget convertibles.
post #3723 of 9498
Get two (of the same sex!) and I think they will be much happier.

My high school girlfriend raised French Lop, Netherland Dwarf & Mini-Lops. They were kept in elevated cages, and they had a guy that would pay them to come and harvest the worms from the manure piles under the cages. He then sold the worms to the bait shops at the lake.
Edited by billybob_jcv - 7/15/13 at 8:42am
post #3724 of 9498
Thread Starter 
Two does. The cuteness, it burns!


`sup?

post #3725 of 9498
Perfect! The nice thing about mini lops (and really rabbits in general) is that the cuteness doesn't really go away as they get older.
post #3726 of 9498
Thread Starter 
It's so awesome, watching the little buggers running around, they love to play, she named them Glinda and Theodora. The cats are like "WTF?" and the bunnies are "you bother my sister and I'll whip your ass", they're kind of a aggressive (curious) and sure don't act like a prey species. Talk about soft, the fur on their bellies is awesome (and they like having it rubbed).
post #3727 of 9498
So - which one gets to be the Good Witch?
post #3728 of 9498
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

So - which one gets to be the Good Witch?

"Mine" is the gray one (Glinda) and hers is the black one, of course. rolleyes.gif Though most of the evening she walked around with both of them in her pockets. Emma loves them, watching her chase them around made my whole day. We didn't let her do that with Babs, it was far too timid.
Edited by Magick Man - 7/15/13 at 11:47pm
post #3729 of 9498
If she starts making clothes for the bunnies, watch out...

post #3730 of 9498
Thread Starter 
My wife puts a coat on the lion-rat (Pablo) in the winter, so that wouldn't be a huge stretch. biggrin.gif


New article, by me, that's likely to inspire strong feelings from the Ferrari faithful in the club:


Of Maranello and Monkeys


I really like Ferraris, I would say I love them, but well, that isn't exactly true. I'll start with what I find most appealing, and that's their form. There's a way it leads the eye; it's not that they're gorgeous from every angle (the Enzo), but there's an overall symmetry at work that's truly inspiring, like the arch a woman's back or curve of a hip. Perhaps that credit goes to Pininfarina or Scaglietti, I'm not entirely sure, but it's there and they work it better than any other in the business (except perhaps Pagani). Also, there's the engineering, it's all extremely clever and the look and feel of each part is special. You look at a panel, knob, or valve cover and you see there's some incredible engineering at work there. So between the design and development stages, they're peerless, for the most part, and the amount of man-years invested into each particular model is obvious. These men (and probably ladies, as well) know their craft.

Then, well, there's no easy way to say this, but, there's a severe disconnect.

Ferrari has quality control issues. No, not the materials, or the components, or even the way they're designed to work together; it's how they're actually put together and then setup. All of them I've driven, with the exception of our 360 Modena, seems like it was built by an ADHD orangutan, and if I have to be completely honest, I believe the 360 was professionally re-worked before I bought it (and so does my mechanic) so it was likely in the same boat. It's inexcusable, really, even the 458 was low on power and considerably slower in stock form than Ferrari claims, and that's because it was low on compression in 2 out of 8 cylinders. The greatest Ferrari ever made, the F40, looks like the interior was pieced together from scraps and then hot glued by blind convicts. With as much as they charge, you'd think they'd make more of an effort to deliver cars that are properly sorted and presentable.

For a while I've been looking for a 599 GTB with a stick, and this week I went and checked one out at the dealership in Long Island. It looks great, but I think it has the worst clutch feel of any sports car I've ever driven, the pedal is way too high and doesn’t disengage until the very top (it only has 4400 miles on it) and the throttle pedal sticks a little at 1/4 depression. Yeah, we can adjust all that, but that isn't the point, it never should have left the factory that way. Chris Harris is right, I don't think they give a damn how the cars perform in the real world, they send specially tuned “ringers” to the press, make the journalists use them in specific ways, and then follow-up with threats if they receive anything less than a glowing review. This isn't what Ferrari used to be, at one time they were the gods of the automotive world and they ruled due to brass balls and sheer performance, they weren't masters of bait-and-switch and shady marketing (yeah, Enzo was an ass and a bit of a shyster, but he cared about the quality of the cars that left the factory).

I suppose I don't get it, why don't they just build them properly out of the gate? Then they wouldn't have to resort to shenanigans, they'd simply be delivering the actual cars that the public perceives them to be in the first place (and they wouldn't be creating this animosity between them and the press in the process). Surely they aren't saving that much money using trained apes, rather than qualified labor, you'd think the savings in legal expenses alone would make up the difference.

And yeah, I did get the 599. Not because of what it is, but what I believe it can be (after my guys fix whatever the hell is wrong). Maybe I'm a sap, I don't know, but when everything is just right, there really isn't anything out there like a Ferrari... bananas not included.
Edited by Magick Man - 7/16/13 at 1:52pm
post #3731 of 9498
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magick Man View Post

My wife puts a coat on the lion-rat (Pablo) in the winter, so that wouldn't be a huge stretch. biggrin.gif


New article, by me, that's likely to inspire strong feelings from the Ferrari faithful in the club:


Of Maranello and Monkeys


I really like Ferraris, I would say I love them, but well, that isn't exactly true. I'll start with what I find most appealing, and that's their form. There's a way it leads the eye; it's not that they're gorgeous from every angle (the Enzo), but there's an overall symmetry at work that's truly inspiring, like the arch a woman's back or curve of a hip. Perhaps that credit goes to Pininfarina or Scaglietti, I'm not entirely sure, but it's there and they work it better than any other in the business (except perhaps Pagani). Also, there's the engineering, it's all extremely clever and the look and feel of each part is special. You look at a panel, knob, or valve cover and you see there's some incredible engineering at work there. So between the design and development stages, they're peerless, for the most part, and the amount of man-years invested into each particular model is obvious. These men (and probably ladies, as well) know their craft.

Then, well, there's no easy way to say this, but, there's a severe disconnect.

Ferrari has quality control issues. No, not the materials, or the components, or even the way they're designed to work together; it's how they're actually put together and then setup. All of them I've driven, with the exception of our 360 Modena, seems like it was built by an ADHD orangutan, and if I have to be completely honest, I believe the 360 was professionally re-worked before I bought it (and so does my mechanic) so it was likely in the same boat. It's inexcusable, really, even the 458 was low on power and considerably slower in stock form than Ferrari claims, and that's because it was low on compression in 2 out of 8 cylinders. The greatest Ferrari ever made, the F40, looks like the interior was pieced together from scraps and then hot glued by blind convicts. With as much as they charge, you'd think they'd make more of an effort to deliver cars that are properly sorted and presentable.

For a while I've been looking for a 599 GTB with a stick, and this week I went and checked one out at the dealership in Long Island. It looks great, but I think it has the worst clutch feel of any sports car I've ever driven, the pedal is way too high and doesn’t disengage until the very top (it only has 4400 miles on it) and the throttle pedal sticks a little at 1/4 depression. Yeah, we can adjust all that, but that isn't the point, it never should have left the factory that way. Chris Harris is right, I don't think they give a damn how the cars perform in the real world, they send specially tuned “ringers” to the press, make the journalists use them in specific ways, and then follow-up with threats if they receive anything less than a glowing review. This isn't what Ferrari used to be, at one time they were the gods of the automotive world and they ruled due to brass balls and sheer performance, they weren't masters of bait-and-switch and shady marketing (yeah, Enzo was an ass and a bit of a shyster, but he cared about the quality of the cars that left the factory).

I suppose I don't get it, why don't they just build them properly out of the gate? Then they wouldn't have to resort to shenanigans, they'd simply be delivering the actual cars that the public perceives them to be in the first place (and they wouldn't be creating this animosity between them and the press in the process). Surely they aren't saving that much money using trained apes, rather than qualified labor, you'd think the savings in legal expenses alone would make up the difference.

And yeah, I did get the 599. Not because of what it is, but what I believe it can be (after my guys fix whatever the hell is wrong). Maybe I'm a sap, I don't know, but when everything is just right, there really isn't anything out there like a Ferrari... bananas not included.

 

That's a good read. Looking forward to hearing about reaction to the article from the other club members! popcorn.gif

post #3732 of 9498
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magick Man View Post

My wife puts a coat on the lion-rat (Pablo) in the winter, so that wouldn't be a huge stretch. biggrin.gif


New article, by me, that's likely to inspire strong feelings from the Ferrari faithful in the club:


Of Maranello and Monkeys


I really like Ferraris, I would say I love them, but well, that isn't exactly true. I'll start with what I find most appealing, and that's their form. There's a way it leads the eye; it's not that they're gorgeous from every angle (the Enzo), but there's an overall symmetry at work that's truly inspiring, like the arch a woman's back or curve of a hip. Perhaps that credit goes to Pininfarina or Scaglietti, I'm not entirely sure, but it's there and they work it better than any other in the business (except perhaps Pagani). Also, there's the engineering, it's all extremely clever and the look and feel of each part is special. You look at a panel, knob, or valve cover and you see there's some incredible engineering at work there. So between the design and development stages, they're peerless, for the most part, and the amount of man-years invested into each particular model is obvious. These men (and probably ladies, as well) know their craft.

Then, well, there's no easy way to say this, but, there's a severe disconnect.

Ferrari has quality control issues. No, not the materials, or the components, or even the way they're designed to work together; it's how they're actually put together and then setup. All of them I've driven, with the exception of our 360 Modena, seems like it was built by an ADHD orangutan, and if I have to be completely honest, I believe the 360 was professionally re-worked before I bought it (and so does my mechanic) so it was likely in the same boat. It's inexcusable, really, even the 458 was low on power and considerably slower in stock form than Ferrari claims, and that's because it was low on compression in 2 out of 8 cylinders. The greatest Ferrari ever made, the F40, looks like the interior was pieced together from scraps and then hot glued by blind convicts. With as much as they charge, you'd think they'd make more of an effort to deliver cars that are properly sorted and presentable.

For a while I've been looking for a 599 GTB with a stick, and this week I went and checked one out at the dealership in Long Island. It looks great, but I think it has the worst clutch feel of any sports car I've ever driven, the pedal is way too high and doesn’t disengage until the very top (it only has 4400 miles on it) and the throttle pedal sticks a little at 1/4 depression. Yeah, we can adjust all that, but that isn't the point, it never should have left the factory that way. Chris Harris is right, I don't think they give a damn how the cars perform in the real world, they send specially tuned “ringers” to the press, make the journalists use them in specific ways, and then follow-up with threats if they receive anything less than a glowing review. This isn't what Ferrari used to be, at one time they were the gods of the automotive world and they ruled due to brass balls and sheer performance, they weren't masters of bait-and-switch and shady marketing (yeah, Enzo was an ass and a bit of a shyster, but he cared about the quality of the cars that left the factory).

I suppose I don't get it, why don't they just build them properly out of the gate? Then they wouldn't have to resort to shenanigans, they'd simply be delivering the actual cars that the public perceives them to be in the first place (and they wouldn't be creating this animosity between them and the press in the process). Surely they aren't saving that much money using trained apes, rather than qualified labor, you'd think the savings in legal expenses alone would make up the difference.

And yeah, I did get the 599. Not because of what it is, but what I believe it can be (after my guys fix whatever the hell is wrong). Maybe I'm a sap, I don't know, but when everything is just right, there really isn't anything out there like a Ferrari... bananas not included.


That ought to dislocate a few noses.:)

 

Not limited to Ferrari by any means, this high end lack of continuity and tailored review items. You can find similar stories in every industry (ahem, Audio being one) It would seem that the move to premium brands in the 80's has left us a legacy of companies at the mesospheric end of the spectrum that have lost abilities which were foundation items in their history.

 

  One can but hope that the phrase "Those who ignore history will be destined to repeat it." actually does apply in these cases.

post #3733 of 9498
Thread Starter 
I don't mind that a high-end sports car is quirky, that's part of the appeal, it's when they're dodgy that I get ruffled.
post #3734 of 9498
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magick Man View Post

I don't mind that a high-end sports car is quirky, that's part of the appeal, it's when they're dodgy that I get ruffled.


So then, you're not a Lotus guybiggrin.gif

post #3735 of 9498
I think it's simply a different case of the "Beats Syndrome" - every time the Marketing & Branding departments take the lead at a company, the customer loses. The *idea* of the brand or the product becomes more important than the actual product. No expense is spared to market the brand and on the superficial product design - but the execution of the actual product gets very little attention. I've seen a little of this exact phenomenon at companies where I have worked, and IMHO it may not actually be done on purpose. When the senior executives at the company are all from Sales & Marketing - they may only have a superficial awareness of the engineering & manufacturing knowledge needed to actually execute the product. They put pressure on the engineering & operations departments with unrealistic schedules and arbitrary cost cutting - and they will do whatever it takes to make their marketing plans and sales forecasts come true. When the Director of Manufacturing tells them there is a problem or that the schedule is unrealistic - the guys from Sales & Marketing will assume it's the start of a negotiation - because EVERYTHING to them is a negotiation. Call it arrogance or stupidity - but in their minds they think they are doing the right thing for the company - and that's really the sad part.
Edited by billybob_jcv - 7/16/13 at 7:55pm
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