Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Members' Lounge (General Discussion) › An audiophile and petrolhead's journal: Buckle up!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

An audiophile and petrolhead's journal: Buckle up! - Page 221

post #3301 of 7692
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

In stock form, I think the newer vettes are MUCH more agile than the older ones. And, you can't forget that it's all relative. Compared to a '55 Chevy Belair or a Country Squire Wagon, the Corvette handles like a dream!

True that, all things are relative, I suppose. Stock Mustangs of that era are scary, compared to just about anything built today. Modern radials really help a lot, though.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Achmedisdead View Post

When I was ~13 years old, my uncle's friend had a 1978 Corvette, and I pestered him into taking me out for a ride in it. At the time, the engine in it was still stock, so it wasn't terribly fast (by today's standards), but he had very wide tires on it all the way around, and he was going through turns marked at 35mph at 70-75mph....no body roll, but you felt every single ripple in the road....there was no give in that suspension at all. I do remember hearing squeaks and rattles, too.

Yeah, the C3 isn't Chevy's crowning achievement (170hp, stock?!?), but it was a lot better than anything else they were building at the time (NTTSM). biggrin.gif With few exceptions, the 70s were a sports car nightmare, thanks EPA!
post #3302 of 7692
A buddy of mine in college had a '64.5 Mustang 289 "Hi-Performance" convertible as his daily driver. It was all original and unrestored (meaning it was a wreck that barely ran). It looked like a low-rider because the shocks, springs and bushings were worn out. That thing was REALLY scary to drive. If you hit a bump or hole you would oscillate for half a block. The brakes weren't any better!
post #3303 of 7692
I like the Swedish meatball!! Sort of a cross between a Saab jet fighter and an IKEA bedroom set.

post #3304 of 7692
Thread Starter 
Meatball is right, that thing is insane, in terms of specs. With all-natural corn juice, it makes upwards of 1160PS/851kW (that's 1141bhp for us yobs) and 885lbs of torque. That's mental. I have tuned cars with higher raw numbers, but not at this weight (it's 500lbs lighter than the GT and the better side of half a ton lighter than the Aventador), and certainly not with bloody a factory warranty. blink.gif The acceleration has to be Biblical.

Speaking of Godly acceleration. I'm going to reveal monster B4B info, for those petrolheads who want something scary fast for comparatively small scratch. I finally got around to doing some mischief in the Cobra replica and it's insanely fun. That's a good P>W ratio too, though not to the level of the Koenig, and it's really awesome the way it puts the power down. I don't know WTF I was thinking when I talked about adding forced induction on that car, I must have been having an MS episode.

As it is, TC on that car was a really good idea, what's even better is that it's adjustable. Set it on, but with the most amount of slip, and it's properly nuts w/o being bat-**** crazy. You can grip well off the line, provided you aren't just dumping the clutch, and into 2nd and 3rd it'll give a good bark at full gas w/o breaking loose, in a straight line. Not that you can't do that w/o TC, but it does take out a little guesswork. For purists (that's me) it's good that it can be shut off, but I want it on by default, just in case someone else is driving it. The best part, by far, however, is that I can make it go bonkers w/ oversteer any time, practically anywhere, but it feels fairly neutral unless I'm trying to break out, and that's because of the suspension. While the new dampers are a little fiddly, once you get them tuned-in they really prove their worth. Those, with the new coils and AR bars, are an investment in corner surgery, it's all freakishly precise for "stone knife and bear skin" technology. The one thing I'm not crazy about is the shifter, there's a little too much slop and the throws are a bit too long, we have a Hurst that will take care of that. Nothing fancy just a retail Comp/Pro "shorty", but I love the way it feels.
post #3305 of 7692

Just checking into the thread for the first time since being away for a few days...

 

Congrats on the Koenigseggineggogegoig, though it would've been nice to have your communication from the company be that they'd consider making an Agera manual just for you. Though I understand how much work that would take on the part of the company, it would still be great to see a small, dedicated shop like Koenigsegg respond so avidly to their customers.

 

Sorry about the problems with the Delorean and the 'Vette; at least the extra time required for the cars will give you the ability to tailor them to your liking.

 

And a question: When you legalized the GTR did you "want" to make it a three-seater, de-tune it and all of that, or was that something mandated by the government?

post #3306 of 7692
post #3307 of 7692
Quote:
Originally Posted by Achmedisdead View Post

Let's hope this doesn't happen to Magick....

http://autos.yahoo.com/blogs/motoramic/shelby-gt500-shreds-dyno-canadian-fireworks-144623336.html

That already *did* happen - one of his early purchases broke their dyno. Not sure if there were any sparks - it might have had a heart-attack and just rolled over dead...
post #3308 of 7692

This looks cool, for those who have the appropriate BMW and iPhone. http://www.engadget.com/2013/06/04/bmw-m-power-for-ios/

post #3309 of 7692
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssrock64 View Post


And a question: When you legalized the GTR did you "want" to make it a three-seater, de-tune it and all of that, or was that something mandated by the government?

I didn't, it was bought that way.
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

That already *did* happen - one of his early purchases broke their dyno. Not sure if there were any sparks - it might have had a heart-attack and just rolled over dead...

At least when it happened to me it didn't damage the car. redface.gif
Edited by Magick Man - 6/4/13 at 3:27pm
post #3310 of 7692

I have a question for you Magick since you mainly use Michelins.

Are Michelin Pilot Sport 3s overkill for a Honda Jazz/Fit? How good is its threadwear? How's the traction for dry and wet driving? I may buy these tyres for my car.

For reference, my car has 120HP and weighs 1080kg.

As for the roads, well expect a lot of potholes in Jakarta....


Edited by VortexBlast - 6/4/13 at 4:25pm
post #3311 of 7692
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VortexBlast View Post

I have a question for you Magick since you mainly use Michelins.
Are Michelin Pilot Sport 3s overkill for a Honda Jazz/Fit? How good is its threadwear? How's the traction for dry and wet driving? I may buy these tyres for my car.
For reference, my car has 120HP and weighs 1080kg.
I wouldn't use them in the wet or when it's too cold, they're quite soft and don't push water out of the way very well. I'd probably go with the Sport A/S Plus, they're a very good all weather tire that wears and performs well.
post #3312 of 7692
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Oh, I think it will. I don't have anything going on just this moment. Money doesn't have to be a tender subject (NPI).

Back to what I was talking about with habits and perceptions, I think I can help a little there. This is what helped me:

1. Don't view money as a consumable resource. Think of ways to make it grow, study the habits of people who are self-sufficient and read books on the subject, there are lots out there.
2. Do you love to work? 9/10 people who are in the top 1% are extreme workaholics, compared to 3% in the bottom 98. In the case of the former group, they sleep an average of 4-6 hours /night, spend <2 hours /day on recreation. The rest of the time, yeah, you guessed it, they're working on ideas to build wealth.
3. Do you enjoy saving money? I'm not talking about stuffing it away in a mattress or savings account (both bad ideas, of course), but more about getting a good deal. For me, haggling and shopping are more fun than the actual buying. Years ago I actually rewired myself to view spending money as being physically painful, unless it was really necessary, and taught myself that it was emotionally rewarding to save and make more. That last part actually took a long time to undo, and even now it's still a part of me.
4. Do what you love. Make a list of the things you enjoy and find ways to make as many of them as you can profitable. This takes a while but really think about it, actually allot time every day to coming up with ideas and writing them down (2-3 hours), then explore how to make them happen. Don't be afraid to approach successful people in those fields and ask them for advice and information. Some may brush you off but many won't.
5. Go to where the money is. If there's little or no opportunity where you are then you may have to move. Research where the best locations for business are.
6. Don't undervalue your work and efforts. If you treat your time as valuable other people will too. Time = money, money = time.
7. Set financial goals you can achieve and then gradually make them more challenging.
8. Don't quit. At some point you will fall, but learn from it. Analyze what happened and look at is a chance to do better the next time. Don't get angry at other people WRT money, that's like personally drinking poison just to spite them. They won't care and you're only hurting yourself. Get back at them by making yourself better and becoming more successful than they are.

Just thought I'd post this in my thread, in case anyone wanted to make any observations or comments. It seems that in some places, underwear takes precedence over poverty. "Let them eat shorts!"


The Morgan 3 will be by the garage tomorrow, I'm really looking forward to taking it for a spin.
post #3313 of 7692
I think it is a great list, and I agree with each and every point! Just to be an old fart, I'll say that one of things the more recent generations seem to have lost (at least in the US) is a deep-felt desire to succeed. Success seems to have been equated with "sell-out" or "evil". I suppose it's a throw-back to the hippie times of needing to tear down "the establishment". I hear it all the time from my 21 year-old son. I'm NOT saying we need to be like the 80s when people were simply foolish and had no qualms about crushing other people to make another dollar. The other extreme, where we think someone else will provide whatever we want and worrying about success is somehow "uncool" or beneath contempt is also ludicrous. I believe there is nothing wrong with being interested in the accumulation of wealth - it can be an interesting and rewarding hobby or life pursuit just like art, literature or head-fi. Being born doesn't come with a guarantee of basic life essentials, let alone recreational nirvana. I have to decide that being successful is something I will strive to attain - it must be a priority. Will this be easier for those born into successful families? Absolutely. This is yet another reason why it is important to make being successful a priority: So your children will have a head start and be more likely to achieve their own recreational nirvana.
post #3314 of 7692
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

"Success seems to have been equated with "sell-out" or "evil". I suppose it's a throw-back to the hippie times of needing to tear down "the establishment". I hear it all the time from my 21 year-old son. I'm NOT saying we need to be like the 80s when people were simply foolish and had no qualms about crushing other people to make another dollar. The other extreme, where we think someone else will provide whatever we want and worrying about success is somehow "uncool" or beneath contempt is also ludicrous. I believe there is nothing wrong with being interested in the accumulation of wealth"

I respectfully disagree Billybob, people still have the will to succeed but the opportunities are less and expensive.

 

Your kid want to be a wealthy/successful hedge manager? That,ll cost over 500k in tuition/exposure/travel to learn and gain experience before you land a job in a good firm.

 

Rich parents can afford it but the not so rich don't even bother and simply give up. How many can afford a 300k tuition and 200k in travel to London/Zurich etc etc for work exposure?

 

As a banker myself, I have seen how banks in USA operate and believe me, I wouldn't have any of it.

 

The repeated offence's and slap on the wrists or "settlements" create an atmosphere and mindset of "why bother when you cant win". Average Joe simply gives up.

 

The whole setup is too rigged and too one sided that it kills entrepreneurship.

 

I look at how the corporations there behave and it boggles my mind that does this actually happen or is this fiction.

 

A $250 billion money laundering scam by HSBC and not a single charge filed while your average teller misappropriates $250 and ends up in jail and a criminal record.

 

Where is the next Jobs/Gates/Dell/Larry?  Too dejected to even bother fighting and probably cant afford it anyways.


Edited by gikigill - 6/5/13 at 8:33am
post #3315 of 7692
Thread Starter 
Gates, Buffett, Ellison, Murdock, those aren't necessarily "wealth builders", they're entrepreneurs. What I've detailed is a map to being more financially fit, without having to rely on a thunderbolt of inspiration or incredible good fortune. Many of those chaps are, in reality, horrible money managers, despite being good with investments, they simply make so much of it that it doesn't matter. Drop $40M on a house in Tuscany? No problem, it barely even shows up on their yearly expenses, because to them it's about the same as buying a Mars bar. This isn't about the .000001%, the "9 figure" club, it's about understanding how to adjust your thinking enough to break into 7 figures, all on your own. It isn't easy, at first it can be painful, because society wires us to think that spending money and consuming = happiness. For instance, I really like certain things; my books, my cars, my audio gear, but I don't enjoy spending the money to get them. The haggling/bargaining process is great, and a spirited negotiation is one of my favorite forms of entertainment, but actually handing over cash annoys the crap out of me. Here's a good one that I hear a lot, "Not everyone can be rich." That's rubbish. Anyone can be, but few people are willing to do what's necessary to make it happen.

Which leads to ----> People have bad habits, and they also have a propensity for worrying about what others own and they enjoy blaming the system, rather than adjusting what's within their control.. To put a finer point on it, the blame game is an excuse, not a reason. Worrying about who is "controlling the world" doesn't matter when people can't even control themselves. I've asked folks;

"Are you capable of handling your finances?" Most say, "Yeah, I do a decent job."
Then I ask, "Do you have more than $5k in unsecure debt?" Most say, yes.
"Do you have car payments?" Again, most say yes.
"Do you live paycheck to paycheck?" Three-quarters indicate that they do.
"Do you have a retirement strategy?" Almost no one answers yes to that one.

So for most, the real answer to #1 is "No".
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Members' Lounge (General Discussion) › An audiophile and petrolhead's journal: Buckle up!