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Breaking-in headphones, the final verdict! - Page 3

post #31 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magick Man View Post


They could also read Tyll's article and see the data, there are concrete, measurable changes on an auditory level going on.
But yeah, burning in cables, amps, and sources is bunk. However, there's so much snake oil in hi-fi that it's really hard to tell where the line is at times.


:)

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by xnor View Post


Really makes you think.. maybe it's just all in their head? A simple matter of getting used to the (initially bright) sound signature.


Quite likely. I got used to the 225i, and found my first magnum experience boomy. After a while, I realized it was the 225i that was so off, not the magnum. The magnums are really nicely balanced and natural imo.

 

post #32 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by c61746961 View Post

... Unless you're in the sound science forum and all you've got for your argument is "I heard it guys!". With all due respect, you are expected to elaborate on your testing and substantiate your claims with more than subjective experience.


Don't tread on the High-end channel.  You'll be jeered with things like "you don't belong here" for voicing this common-sense opinion.  Adding insult to injury, they then annoint themselves the role of arbiters of "high-end" and "TOTL" sound.

 

post #33 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by xnor View Post


Do you have anything objective to support that claim?

 



my magnums sounded extremely aesthetic when I first started listening to them. Not much depth to the sound. This quickly disappeared over time. I mean. That's just what I heard I guess.

post #34 of 92

     After eqing hd 555 so that it sounds flat, I find that the bass was lacking, but then it sounded much better after a few days, and I am pretty sure the headphones did not break-in, my mind did. 

     

     To prove that its your mind that is breaking-in, you can try turning the bass/treble down, and try listening to them a few days and listen to them again without the eq, you might find the headphones sound very different from what they did before.

post #35 of 92
I had a well used pair of D2000s and a new pair and they sounded different. As I played music and pink noise through the new set over a span of days, they started sounding more and more similar. That's good enough for me.
post #36 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by ImperialX View Post

This has been debated so much I don't see the need of starting another thread.

 

I believe that some aspects of breaking in is psychological, but not all of it for sure.



 

Burn-in is mostly psychological. I’d say probably 85% of it, and 15% maybe physical (depending on headphones). it's rather simple - humans are learning creatures, that’s one aspect that differentiate us from machines. to put it simply, our brain goes through an “adjustment” period. this happens whether it’s physical, visual… or auditory. imagine you visit a place you’ve never been before, or even a place you haven’t seen in a while (whether is a room in a house, school... or even a foreign country), even only after few hours of been in there your perceptions will have changed; after days/weeks/months it will be A LOT different since you viewed the place from the first time. people who say there’s a night & day difference between before & after burn-in is because what they experience it is a night & day difference.
 
When I went to pick up my D2000 I was on a train back home, and I could not resist giving a listen, so I got them out and plugged them straight into the Sansa Clip. I was mortified - that's not what I expected at all! then I plugged them into an amp (I had an Icon combo at that time), and as I kept listening the sound started to make more and more sense.
 
that’s all there’s to it, really.
post #37 of 92

I'm in no position to say what percentage of "break-in" is psychological or not, but dustdevil makes an important point relative to volume. By increasing volume - which just about every use does when listening to music - different samples may sound thinner or fuller depending on volume. That's why it's so important to control for volume before making conclusions on break-in. 

 

 

post #38 of 92

i believe in burn in. i had the chance to compare a burned in d5k with just opened in d5k. i can tell clearly there's a significant difference between the two. my other friends tried as well and we arrived with the same conclusion.

post #39 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by qohelet View Post

i believe in burn in. i had the chance to compare a burned in d5k with just opened in d5k. i can tell clearly there's a significant difference between the two. my other friends tried as well and we arrived with the same conclusion.


ABX them to confirm smily_headphones1.gif Same goes for your friend.
post #40 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by qohelet View Post

i believe in burn in. i had the chance to compare a burned in d5k with just opened in d5k. i can tell clearly there's a significant difference between the two. my other friends tried as well and we arrived with the same conclusion.


Even with ABX, coulda just been driver variation.
post #41 of 92

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chrislangley4253 View Post


Even with ABX, coulda just been driver variation.

 

+1, or pad differences. And frankly, without that ABX, we can't even say for sure the difference was audible.


Edited by liamstrain - 4/19/12 at 1:18pm
post #42 of 92
But for what its worth, I do believe certain drivers do burn in quite a bit.
post #43 of 92

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by liamstrain View Post

 

 

... And frankly, without that ABX, we can't even say for sure the difference was audible.

 

That seems to be utterly insignificant and unimportant to most on this forum, I would say.  Very few have an interest in keeping themselves honest.

post #44 of 92

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mauricio View Post

In no instance has there been a person who's said that it sounded worse. 

 

That's not true.  Myself and a handful of others have said just that.  Some people just choose to have selective reading or haven't read enough impressions.  I've sent back 3 phones IME and purrin got rid of another.  So feel free to get back to the argument but please stop spouting universal claims that aren't true.  You should have enough to talk about w/o reverting to straw men.

 

I see there's quite a few new joins here.  FYI this merry go round has been spinning for a long time.  Often a good idea to search out some prior threads.

 

Sound Science needs a separate sub-forum called Ground Hog day.

 


Edited by Anaxilus - 4/21/12 at 1:48am
post #45 of 92

Ok, fair enough, how's this?

 

The overwhelming majority of, indeed the preponderance of impressions here point to equipment sounding better, rather than worse, after break-in.

 

Since the dawn of communication, humans have had to speak in generalizations.  We all do it all the time.  Otherwise we'd never communicate a point because our conversations would soon get bogged down with an interminable stream of exceptions, provisos and caveats.  You know what I am saying, yet you are calling me to task based on a literalism.

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