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The Beyerdynamic DT250 Appreciation Thread - Page 3

post #31 of 679
Thread Starter 

I just did a sweep test comparing the dt250-250 to my hd600 and I realized that even a well burned in hd600 isn't perfectly matched from left to right, in fact there are more narrow band variations on the hd600 drivers vs my dt250. It just so happens that the dt250s was more noticeable because 100 to 250 hz is something that sticks out as more thickness in the sound of the left while on the hd600 the peaks are so narrow that it is hardly heard in most busy and fast music. Also since the differences seem like they are less than 2db vs around 5db when i first got them out of the box, I really think that burn in is doing its magic here.

 

I like these cans so much I think I'll also buy an 80 ohm version to complete the collection LOL

post #32 of 679
Thread Starter 

After hours of not playing any music on it and listening to the cans again now suddenly the balance problem is gone. Something happened to the ease of the flow of the sound too now these cans are just suddenly overall even more musical than my hd600s WTF! These are fast becoming my favorite cans ever regardless of the lack of pyrotechnics that higher end cans tend to have.

post #33 of 679

I have the 80 ohm version and I love them. They seem a bit dark in the highs at times but sometimes that can be a good thing. Im not sure if I like the DT250 or DT440 more. There my 2 favorite headphones regardless though,

post #34 of 679

The 250 Ohm version is in no way dark in the highs. They are crystal-clear to the extreme - much like the highs of the DT880. Actually, the DT250 seems even clearer due to the fact that the midrange is not recessed like in the DT880. 

 

In my opinion, the DT880 wins in terms of soundstage but the DT250 beats it in clarity/detail.

post #35 of 679

What are the weaknesses of the 250 Ohm version, besides smaller soundstage? These sound too good to be true. (I wish they were foldable...)
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jupitreas View Post

The 250 Ohm version is in no way dark in the highs. They are crystal-clear to the extreme - much like the highs of the DT880. Actually, the DT250 seems even clearer due to the fact that the midrange is not recessed like in the DT880. 

 

In my opinion, the DT880 wins in terms of soundstage but the DT250 beats it in clarity/detail.



 

post #36 of 679
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by imackler View Post

What are the weaknesses of the 250 Ohm version, besides smaller soundstage? These sound too good to be true. (I wish they were foldable...)
 



 



The weaknesses are that they are not expensive enough for people to take seriously LOL

 

Seriously though, weaknesses? Almost nothing except maybe that they don't have the nth degree of detail that high end open cans have. They've got it where it counts though. Its so hard to get a headphone with spot on tonality regardless of whether they are open or closed.

post #37 of 679

For some people as well, they are a bit bland sounding.  You get really clean, serious, balanced, excellent quality, but there's no sizzle or boom or pizazz.  Some will find that a benefit, others a drawback.

post #38 of 679

Technically, the drivers in the DT250 are on about the same level as those in the DT770, DT880 and DT990 (same size, very similar-looking, likely from the very same factory). Also, they cost as much as the DT770 PRO and the DT990 PRO - in other words, the DT250 represents the same level of sound as those models but they cost less because (in the premium editions) the materials used are likely more expensive. The DT250 is pretty much entirely plastic (there is just a thin layer of metal in the headband). 

 

As for its faults, IMO they are:

-as has been mentioned before, they can sound boring to some due to their obsessive focus on proper tonality and clarity

-they don't fold

-they are uncomfortable for some since their cups and pads are on the small side

-those not used to the Beyerdynamic emphasis on treble will probably find them piercing

-they are not really a thing of beauty, aesthetically speaking, although their functionality-first design does have a certain allure

-they use a proprietary cable plug and the only cable officially available for them is a rather bulky and uncomfortable coiled cable. It is not easy to find a straight cable for them.

-the 250 ohm version is pretty difficult to drive, most PMPs will probably not suffice (although Cowon devices do have enough power for them)

 

Most of these faults are really just little annoyances though, their traits far outweigh any faults they might have. They are just so amazingly uncolored and detailed, they give you that sensation of listening to something really high fidelity. I used to think that the Shure SRH940 was worth its price due to their fantastic detail, however, now I think they are a waste of money. The DT250 is just as detailed, if not moreso, while also having fantastic bass, which the SRH940 can't compete with at all.

 

I think that the reason why these cans are not very popular these days is because:

-they are an old design so the novelty has worn off

-they look like something from the 80s

-Beyerdynamic isnt promoting them much
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by imackler View Post

What are the weaknesses of the 250 Ohm version, besides smaller soundstage? These sound too good to be true. (I wish they were foldable...)
 



 



 

post #39 of 679


Really wish I could audition them again. I had the 80ohm version a couple of years ago and thought they were a bit boring...but that was coming from the great AKG mids....the 240DF and the 240S, which also beat the Beyer in sound stage being semi open. They were very neutral sounding though, and comparable to the DF in a lot of ways, with better bass and much less treble. The 250ohm version obviously fixes the treble problem. Sorry I never got to hear the 250ohm version.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jupitreas View Post

Technically, the drivers in the DT250 are on about the same level as those in the DT770, DT880 and DT990 (same size, very similar-looking, likely from the very same factory). Also, they cost as much as the DT770 PRO and the DT990 PRO - in other words, the DT250 represents the same level of sound as those models but they cost less because (in the premium editions) the materials used are likely more expensive. The DT250 is pretty much entirely plastic (there is just a thin layer of metal in the headband). 

 

As for its faults, IMO they are:

-as has been mentioned before, they can sound boring to some due to their obsessive focus on proper tonality and clarity

-they don't fold

-they are uncomfortable for some since their cups and pads are on the small side

-those not used to the Beyerdynamic emphasis on treble will probably find them piercing

-they are not really a thing of beauty, aesthetically speaking, although their functionality-first design does have a certain allure

-they use a proprietary cable plug and the only cable officially available for them is a rather bulky and uncomfortable coiled cable. It is not easy to find a straight cable for them.

-the 250 ohm version is pretty difficult to drive, most PMPs will probably not suffice (although Cowon devices do have enough power for them)

 

Most of these faults are really just little annoyances though, their traits far outweigh any faults they might have. They are just so amazingly uncolored and detailed, they give you that sensation of listening to something really high fidelity. I used to think that the Shure SRH940 was worth its price due to their fantastic detail, however, now I think they are a waste of money. The DT250 is just as detailed, if not moreso, while also having fantastic bass, which the SRH940 can't compete with at all.

 

I think that the reason why these cans are not very popular these days is because:

-they are an old design so the novelty has worn off

-they look like something from the 80s

-Beyerdynamic isnt promoting them much
 



 



 

post #40 of 679
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by joelpearce View Post

For some people as well, they are a bit bland sounding.  You get really clean, serious, balanced, excellent quality, but there's no sizzle or boom or pizazz.  Some will find that a benefit, others a drawback.



Well, that boom and pizazz will be the death of them. If they have that then they will just be like the others... ordinary :)

post #41 of 679

I've had my 80ohm for years, and they are great.  They are very balanced, and a fantastic all-around headphone, but they don't have anything like the resolution of the AKG 271, which is my preferred closed can under $200.

 

The thing with the 250s is that while they aren't a design classic, they are low profile so they don't attract attention and they fit under a hoodie well when taking walks.  They also aren't fatiguing when listening in bed, sound fine straight of an MP3 player, are super comfortable IMO, and they are damn durable (although my cable did fail once, requiring replacement - the coiled cable is good in some situations, but heavy as crap).  The pads also hold up well over time.

post #42 of 679
Thread Starter 

k271? aren't those a step down in sound vs the k240s in some ways?

post #43 of 679

The DT250 is flatter then they are anyway... The K271 has a dip in the upper midrange (probably done to tame their harshness) and the bass rolls off relatively early. The DT250 has no such dips anywhere on its frequency range and the bass extends all the way down to at least 20Hz. I auditioned the K271 MKII a few weeks ago and was not hugely impressed - they were a decent pair of monitors but nothing to write home about. IMO the DT250 (250 Ohm) has higher resolution than the K271 MKII. 

post #44 of 679

I haven't heard the k240, but since they are open I don't how useful a comparison it would be.

post #45 of 679

the dt250/80 is my favourite headphone - the one i'll never sell. the balance is perfect to my ears and it is a great long listening session phone as it never fatigues. i have owned the dt250/250 at one time and decided i just liked the more forward nature of the vocal on the 80 ohm version a lot more. i have owned the srh840 and chose the dt250 ahead of it due to its less bloated feeling and smoother treble. My search has always been for an open version of the dt250. I am using the hd650 which i have sold and rebought as i decided that it was a keeper. I have been through the hd600 but missed the bass response of the hd650 and dt250. i have flirted with grado and loved them but found the rs2 a little fatigueing and sold them too but i am getting some magnums this week so im hoping they give me the cross between grado and hd650 that i have read about and they may become my number 1. i had a listen to a friends sr80 non i with hd414 pads and really liked them so i am going to explore that sound to at some stage but im hoping the magnums will be the grado for me and i can sit still for the rest of the year - my autumn resolution (im an aussie). but back to the point the dt250 in either version is one of the most underrated cans on Head Fi and its great to see them getting their time in the sun

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