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Are CDs still a worthy investment? - Page 3

post #31 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottv50 View Post

I buy all of my new music on CD and then rip to AIFF files at full resolution, then store the CD's away as the masters and play from the ripped files.



Why not ALAC which makes smaller files?


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rroseperry View Post


Ok, this is a point of view I've seen in other audiophiles that I simply do not understand. I buy music because I like the music. That means that sometimes the only recording I can get of a performer or piece I like is poorly recorded. I'm not just talking about loudness wars CDs. There's a composition by Richard Strauss called Metamorphosen. The only recording of it I've been able to find was by the Berlin Symphony for (or off from the sound of it) the radio. The sound quality? Crap. The performance? Pretty amazing.
I think music lovers, as opposed to gear lovers, will put up with a poor recording of old and new music, if they love the music. And listen to it on more forgiving set ups.


This is why I will never call myself an audiophile.  It's also why I'll never own extremely revealing equipment.  I listened to a Norah Jones CD at a meet with an HD800 and it was unlistenable.  Like finger nails on a chalk board.

 

Where have you looked for Metamorphosen and not found it.  There are many versions on Amazon.  I have this version, although from a boxed set, and it sounds good.  http://www.amazon.com/Richard-Strauss--Eulenspiegel-Walzer-Metamorphosen/dp/B000S54NH8/ref=sr_1_4?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1330464574&sr=1-4

post #32 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by scompton View Post



Why not ALAC which makes smaller files?


 


This is why I will never call myself an audiophile.  It's also why I'll never own extremely revealing equipment.  I listened to a Norah Jones CD at a meet with an HD800 and it was unlistenable.  Like finger nails on a chalk board.

Where have you looked for Metamorphosen and not found it.  There are many versions on Amazon.  I have this version, although from a boxed set, and it sounds good.  http://www.amazon.com/Richard-Strauss--Eulenspiegel-Walzer-Metamorphosen/dp/B000S54NH8/ref=sr_1_4?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1330464574&sr=1-4

It was a number of years ago before that reissue it looks like, and I was going through local brick and mortar stores. Thanks for the tip. I'll pick that up.
(edited to add) the one I've got is Wilhelm Furtwängler's so, pretty amazing.
Edited by rroseperry - 2/28/12 at 1:48pm
post #33 of 77

Nope, this isn't Mastered for iTunes:

http://www.macrumors.com/2012/02/28/apple-reportedly-developing-high-definition-audio-format-with-adaptive-streaming/

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by xnor View Post

CDs are great. Rip them and compress them with a lossless codec like flac - enjoy them to all eternity.
Yay, remastered versions compressed with aac. -_- I'd rather throw my money out of the window.


 

post #34 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Somnambulist View Post

Funny timing: rumours circulating Apple are about to introduce higher quality audio to iTunes. Maybe my CD buying days will be numbered...


 Apple's enthusiasm for HQ content seems to have waned since Jobs demise. 

 

post #35 of 77

I think the 192KHz/24bit downloads or mastered from Apple might use ALAC. if so what would you do? If the price was competetive and it used full ALAC and either used their masters or had them made new versions? would you get it?

post #36 of 77

Quote:

Originally Posted by Somnambulist View Post

Nope, this isn't Mastered for iTunes

 

This adaptive format could actually yield worse results. But anyway, I would never buy lossy songs but that's just me. If they offer ALAC or even better FLAC then I'll take a look at iTunes again.
 

 

post #37 of 77

*double post*

post #38 of 77

If LP is still around then i don't think CD will die anytime soon, and yes i still like the artwork/notes/pictures/lossless that i get and supporting the band with a record sale even if they only get about $1 from it. If CDs were still $20 i'd say heck no! lol

post #39 of 77


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rroseperry View Post


Ok, this is a point of view I've seen in other audiophiles that I simply do not understand. I buy music because I like the music. That means that sometimes the only recording I can get of a performer or piece I like is poorly recorded. I'm not just talking about loudness wars CDs. There's a composition by Richard Strauss called Metamorphosen. The only recording of it I've been able to find was by the Berlin Symphony for (or off from the sound of it) the radio. The sound quality? Crap. The performance? Pretty amazing.
I think music lovers, as opposed to gear lovers, will put up with a poor recording of old and new music, if they love the music. And listen to it on more forgiving set ups

 

For the record, I'm not one of those music snobs who only listen to jazz and classical. Some of my favorite bands are on the louder and noisier side of the spectrum (looking at you RHCP). I'm always on the lookout for new music and I regularly subject myself to music which has AWFUL production for the sake of trying something new.

 

That being said, production does play a major factor into how much I will like an album/band. Once you've heard high quality recordings/masterings through nice playback equipment, the shortcomings of other music becomes glaringly obvious. So obvious in fact, that it is distracting to the listening experience. Sometimes I listen to something with a poor mastering and wonder how much better it could sound if I could back in time and slap some sense into the record execs. There's also a certain level of expectation baggage that I carry. Many bands (especially nowadays) put on the guise of "lo-fi" sound. I don't really mind that; it's what the artist is trying to create. However, some music is simply destroyed in the mastering process for no other purpose than making it "louder". I'm talking about clipping drums, recessed guitars, sloppy bass that make the music unlistenable from a sonical perspective. It might be great musically, but if it's unlistenable on good gear, then there's a good chance I won't be revisiting it.

post #40 of 77

For me...CD's as well as LP's are totally worth the money....

 

Why?

 

Because most can be had to about the same price as the digital files BUT the CD/LP contains better quality files. Moreover, there is a lot of music that has never been digitally released that you can easily find on CD/LP's. Also, and this might just be me, I enjoy holding the actual album while I listen to the music.

post #41 of 77

Yep, I feels the way. Digital files are too expensive for what they are. I won't get into the whole digital music download until they start offering lossless files.

post #42 of 77

I can get used CDs for a few bucks excluding shipping costs so they are worth it for me. I love to buy CDs because I can have the freedom to rip the music into .FLAC files and I can make copies of the CDs for my family and friends which I rarely do so. CDs are a good investment because they will continue to be new music released on the Compact Disc format for many years to come in the future and prices are usually low for new releases by major artists and bands.

post #43 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by OJNeg View Post


 

 

For the record, I'm not one of those music snobs who only listen to jazz and classical. Some of my favorite bands are on the louder and noisier side of the spectrum (looking at you RHCP). I'm always on the lookout for new music and I regularly subject myself to music which has AWFUL production for the sake of trying something new.

 

That being said, production does play a major factor into how much I will like an album/band. Once you've heard high quality recordings/masterings through nice playback equipment, the shortcomings of other music becomes glaringly obvious. So obvious in fact, that it is distracting to the listening experience. Sometimes I listen to something with a poor mastering and wonder how much better it could sound if I could back in time and slap some sense into the record execs. There's also a certain level of expectation baggage that I carry. Many bands (especially nowadays) put on the guise of "lo-fi" sound. I don't really mind that; it's what the artist is trying to create. However, some music is simply destroyed in the mastering process for no other purpose than making it "louder". I'm talking about clipping drums, recessed guitars, sloppy bass that make the music unlistenable from a sonical perspective. It might be great musically, but if it's unlistenable on good gear, then there's a good chance I won't be revisiting it.


You know, I understand that. There is music that is rendered horrible through mastering. But I think what listening to extremely good gear (Like n3rdling's Orpheus) has shown me is that I've got an upper limit to what I will ever buy (even if I had the $$$). Frankly, my music collection ranges from some extremely funky low res recordings, to lossless and vinyl. And some of the funkiest stuff isn't replaceable, being out of print, small releases, or oddities. And I always want to be able to listen to it.

That Orpheus is something amazing, though.
post #44 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by jenneth View Post

Yep, I feels the way. Digital files are too expensive for what they are. I won't get into the whole digital music download until they start offering lossless files.



If you are willing to look beyond iTunes & Amazon, there are several places where you can find those, and often at a lower price than the CD (which makes sense since there's no manufacturing and shipping involved). They are usually lossless & DRM-free, so you can enjoy them like any CD you ripped yourself.

 

Admittedly it's not the largest choice, but that can be a virtue. Rather than looking for something/someone specific and not finding them, it can be fun to peruse what's available, usually tracks are listenable or even free downloads, and I have come across some nice finds that I would have otherwise missed! Which is a large part of what makes listening to music enjoyable!

post #45 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by scompton View Post



Why not ALAC which makes smaller files?

 

Because I have the storage space and I don't want the overhead of having to decompress files on the fly. One day when I have the time I will do a side-by-side comparison of AIFF vs ALAC but for now I have more storage space than time! :)

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