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Are CDs still a worthy investment?

post #1 of 77
Thread Starter 

Do you guys think buying CDs is still worth it now in 2012? If you had a list of songs, how would you go about getting them? I reckon in the next few years CDs will become extinct as the masses continue to stream their tunes at 128kbps through cheapobuds, leaving those who want a physical/lossless collection in trouble.

 

What's the most future-proof way of obtaining my "list of music" right now, bearing in mind all the songs are post-1980, other than classical stuff. Buying the CDs for a couple of quid on Amazon, or just giving up on lossless as the labels seem to be doing?

 

Your thoughts are welcome

post #2 of 77

If you buy a CD, you'll always be able to use that CD and anything you rip from it. So I don't see why it could possibly be a bad investment.

 

Why are you making so many threads all of a sudden?

post #3 of 77
Aside from hype, there's no reason to think the format will be extinct anytime soon. The issue, IMO, is whether you want or need a high quality reproduction or not. If so, get he CDs. If not, get it however (legally) you can.

I guess I don't quite understand how this is a question.
post #4 of 77

Perplexed, I'm not sure that choosing any one medium is a way of trying to build a "future-proof" collection of music.  At the risk of seeming to be rooted firmly in the Middle Ages, I have to look at my own experience with collecting music.  I began in the late '50s (that's 1950s!) by piling up lots of 45 singles; then moved on to lots of 33 albums and reel-to-reel tapes; then fell hard for 8-track tapes & players; backed off and moved to cassette tapes; went through a phase with all of 'em mixed together; then "heard the future" - in the form of the CD - and put almost all my eggs in that basket.  Now, of course, Chicken Little is emerging for his annual spring song about "The Death of CDs," so I'm pestered by a few doubts about my past decisions and present choices.  But, given how rapidly the rates of technological innovation and modes of delivering audio performances are accelerating, I'm happy to just sort of tread water and try to stay happily afloat until I'm forced to swim toward some (now distant) shore because I can't locate any more CDs and/or any way to repair or replace my latest CD players.

 

I guess this is a long way of saying, "Worry less about having your 'music list' captured in a future-proof format - and spend more time, RIGHT NOW, listening to and enjoying the music on that list."  The only way to be absolutely "future-proof" is to be dead!  Thirty years from now, if I'm not dead, I might still be listening happily to my CDs . . . or I might be experiencing musical performances - with all my senses, as if I were there - streamed directly into my brain via a nano-chip implanted in my skull (in a nifty 1--minute outpatient procedure) for just $9.99 at the local clinic of WaltonWorld Enterprises, Inc. . . . or I might just be humming the melodies of my favorite songs, as best I can remember and render them, as I scrounge for firewood to boil some water and make my once-a-week meal of post-nuclear-holocaust squirrel!

 

Keep listening and keep smilin'!

Kev

post #5 of 77

I still buy them but the ones I buy are oop so they are used and expensive.

post #6 of 77
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Head Injury View Post

If you buy a CD, you'll always be able to use that CD and anything you rip from it. So I don't see why it could possibly be a bad investment.

 

Why are you making so many threads all of a sudden?


True. I think I'll just buy a load of used CDs off Amazon then, and when they start phasing out CDs I'll just rip and carry on.

 

Why am I making loads of threads? Why not? I'm just trying to come with a solution for my needs, and this seems like a good forum to help me.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SmilinKev View Post

Perplexed, I'm not sure that choosing any one medium is a way of trying to build a "future-proof" collection of music.  At the risk of seeming to be rooted firmly in the Middle Ages, I have to look at my own experience with collecting music.  I began in the late '50s (that's 1950s!) by piling up lots of 45 singles; then moved on to lots of 33 albums and reel-to-reel tapes; then fell hard for 8-track tapes & players; backed off and moved to cassette tapes; went through a phase with all of 'em mixed together; then "heard the future" - in the form of the CD - and put almost all my eggs in that basket.  Now, of course, Chicken Little is emerging for his annual spring song about "The Death of CDs," so I'm pestered by a few doubts about my past decisions and present choices.  But, given how rapidly the rates of technological innovation and modes of delivering audio performances are accelerating, I'm happy to just sort of tread water and try to stay happily afloat until I'm forced to swim toward some (now distant) shore because I can't locate any more CDs and/or any way to repair or replace my latest CD players.

 

I guess this is a long way of saying, "Worry less about having your 'music list' captured in a future-proof format - and spend more time, RIGHT NOW, listening to and enjoying the music on that list."  The only way to be absolutely "future-proof" is to be dead!  Thirty years from now, if I'm not dead, I might still be listening happily to my CDs . . . or I might be experiencing musical performances - with all my senses, as if I were there - streamed directly into my brain via a nano-chip implanted in my skull (in a nifty 1--minute outpatient procedure) for just $9.99 at the local clinic of WaltonWorld Enterprises, Inc. . . . or I might just be humming the melodies of my favorite songs, as best I can remember and render them, as I scrounge for firewood to boil some water and make my once-a-week meal of post-nuclear-holocaust squirrel!

 

Keep listening and keep smilin'!

Kev


Hmm. You make a good point, but I can't accept that I should just leave a collection behind as times change. I think the main reason for you having lost so much is the fact that stored music was only really just starting out; there were loads of different formats competing for dominance, and a lot of music got caught in the crossfire. I'd say things have cooled down a little now - there may be different formats, but you can convert between them fairly easily. Also, as we've pretty much hit the limit in terms of audio quality, there isn't really anywhere to go for the next for years.

 

</pointless thread unless anyone else has any views>

 

post #7 of 77

I buy a dozen or so new issues and a dozen or so other CDs every month.  I've bought a few downloads that are available as lossless, but in general I still buy my music as CDs and rip them.

post #8 of 77

In most cases, "leaving a collection behind" is a choice based on convenience, not a requirement of obselecence. I have thousands of LPs and 78s that are as easy to find equipment to play them on as ever. Admittedly, I would have a hard time locating a laserdisc player or 8 track deck, but for a format as firmly established as CDs, I'm willing to bet that it will always be possible to play them... At least in our lifetimes.

 

I have about 10,000 CDs and I prefer the format, because it isn't subject to going poof in a hard drive crash.

post #9 of 77
Thread Starter 

Hehe, the mass-buying of my CDs has officially begun.. *buys ten CDs on Amazon for 1p each*

post #10 of 77

Buying cds off of amazon is the best way to go with music I think.

post #11 of 77

I don't understand why anyone would buy a $10 256kbps download when you can get (for the most part) a used, full resolution CD from Amazon, etc. for under $5 much of the time.

post #12 of 77

there's new threads..or more as there's been an explosion in headphone buying lately. one thing we can thank Dr.Dre for and head fi comes up a lot

 

yes CD's are awesome. they may also contain part of the data that the original master contained but still much better than MP3's TECHNICALLY. most can't hear a difference. but many also do.  plus there are some gripes from me on teh algorythmn. for audiophiles. it takes some parts out that are audible..sometimes. not too often though

post #13 of 77

Still love CDs, but I can see a time when that changes. When eventually online music can be purchased and downloaded with ease in lossless format it will be harder to justify the CD. I also would worry about having my collection dissapear in a computer crash/theft etc so that would be a big issue for me.

post #14 of 77

Until the day that iTunes/Amazon etc offer music as lossless files, CDs are still worth buying. In terms of the risks of digital files being lost, I imagine it'll be like iTunes Match, where all your CDs are matched to their master copy of that song/album and given you have paid for it (in a sense) you'll always be able to retrieve it from the cloud rather than relying on a personal copy.

 

I will have no idea what to do with all my CDs at that point, but I imagine it shouldn't be hard to move them given the process of change isn't instantaneous and, like other older formats, they will be people who want CDs over digital files. I already rip every CD to ALAC and stick it on my home server, so I'm 50% of the way there, I'm just waiting for the next logical step to occur.

post #15 of 77

Will digital distribution take over? Arguably it already has. Will CDs and LPs ever die completely? Hell no.

 

I still prefer to own physical copies of my music whether it be on vinyl or CD. The internet and MP3s do have their advantages for discovering music and I understand why must audiophiles simply use their desktop as a transport. But for me, nothing beats having a shelf full of albums which I can pick through. Relaxing on a coach instead of in front of a keyboard is also a big plus.

 

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