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Why do you prefer passive speaker/monitors? - Page 6

post #76 of 96

To the best of my knowledge, the A5+ is a powered speaker. That is to say, it has an internal amp, but the x-over is a passive.

post #77 of 96

As the 3rd post said, its all about the control. The ability to pick your own amplifier and pair them up with your passive speaker can yield very "musical" results.

 

Less of an issue with larger active speakers, we also need to keep in mind that there are space constraints in speakers containing 6.5inch woofer and smaller (bookshelves/2-way). The engineering design needs to consider both cost and space available for power and filtering circuitry. So a discrete amplifier has the advantage in that it doesn't really have a space constraint and can have very clean output (KRK's rockits, Alesis m1 and low end models all have very audible noise when they are turned on). Having owned many active studio monitors myself, I do not believe heat is ever an issue though (The times they do overheat is when they are being overdriven, due to using the wrong tool for the job (i.e. small speaker for large room).


Edited by blazer78 - 12/31/12 at 4:07am
post #78 of 96

Active speakers have the advantage on better sound quality as the amp is built right in the cabinet of the speaker.   Old traditional passive system require extra connections, such as interconnects and speaker wires.  More wires, longer wires = degrade signal quality.  

 

And you can't carry around passive audio system around easily.  You would need to rent a U-Haul truck to transport them.  With active speakers all you need is a backpack.  Active wins.  Next.

post #79 of 96

Here you go,

an active speaker system using tubes and solid state amps!

 

http://www.aurumacoustics.com/integris_300B.html

 

Yummy.

post #80 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by goodolcheez View Post

 

And you can't carry around passive audio system around easily.  You would need to rent a U-Haul truck to transport them.  With active speakers all you need is a backpack.  Active wins.  Next.

 

or you could use headphones... instead of carrying a backpack... if you move around a lot, that is...tongue.gif

post #81 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by phototristan View Post

I haven't read through this entire thread yet but in general active speakers can be better in that the amp can be tuned specifically for the speaker, which can yield a more efficient, graceful and better sounding speaker design.

 

It's also better to get the power source (amp) close to the speaker rather than run power via speaker cables, especially for long runs.  I know that in the pro audio world, Meyer Sound prefers and specializes in active speakers.

 

In a stadium for example, they power the speakers in place are and are able to run a clean line level signal, separate from power, into the speakers.

 

I have the active Audioengine A5+ speakers and am a lot more impressed with their sound over what I heard from the passive P4 speakers and their separate N22 amp. 

 



So do you reckon the AE A2 will sound better with their D1 DAC compared to a O2/ODAC (or Schiit M/M) combo with a passive speaker like the Q Acoustics 2010i? I would really appreciate any feedback from more experienced head-fiers. Cheers.

post #82 of 96
I'm not familiar with the Q Acoustics 2010i. Don't hear much about them in the US.

But you need a regular amp, not a headphone amp, to power passive speakers. You would still need a DAC, but the O2 or the Schiit Magni are not gonna work to power speakers. For an inexpensive solution, look into the Lepai LP-2020A+ t-amp:

http://news.cnet.com/8301-13645_3-57439115-47/build-your-own-desktop-stereo-for-under-$70/
http://www.head-fi.org/t/627161/my-very-low-budget-nearfield-desktop-rig-lepai-amp-and-dayton-audio-speakers

Otherwise, if you have for it, a used audio/video or 2 channel receiver is a great way to get an amplifier for a good price.
post #83 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post

I'm not familiar with the Q Acoustics 2010i. Don't hear much about them in the US.

But you need a regular amp, not a headphone amp, to power passive speakers. You would still need a DAC, but the O2 or the Schiit Magni are not gonna work to power speakers. For an inexpensive solution, look into the Lepai LP-2020A+ t-amp:

http://news.cnet.com/8301-13645_3-57439115-47/build-your-own-desktop-stereo-for-under-$70/
http://www.head-fi.org/t/627161/my-very-low-budget-nearfield-desktop-rig-lepai-amp-and-dayton-audio-speakers

Otherwise, if you have for it, a used audio/video or 2 channel receiver is a great way to get an amplifier for a good price.

 



thanks a lot cel4145. do you know of any paired combos like the O2/ODAC or M/M but for speaker setups? I will look into some receivers. thanks again.

post #84 of 96
You don't need a paired setup. You either (a) buy an amp/receiver with a built in DAC or (b) by them separately. In the case of (b), vendors don't typically sell matching DACs and speaker amps. No need for that anyway. You can mix and match as you want.

A used audio/video receiver can be a great way to get a good deal. Most old ones will have optical inputs; newer ones will have HDMI inputs as well. If your computer has either or both of those, then that can work out pretty well. However, if you need USB connection to your computer, then you'll have to go the external DAC route.

Most full sized 2 channel receivers and integrated amps for speakers do NOT have a built in DAC. Still, they can be a great value, and then you can get an external DAC like the Modi.

I'm running the ODAC with an HK 3390 2 channel receiver. HK also makes the 3490 2 channel receiver that has a built in DAC. I think Onkyo has one, too.
post #85 of 96

You cleared it up for me so much! I need USB so I'll go the external DAC route. How do I know if an amp is suitable for speakers? sorry last question....
 

post #86 of 96
Questions are fine smily_headphones1.gif

First, stay away from 4 ohm rated speakers. They can be difficult to drive. Most passive speakers that require amplification are 6 or 8 ohm rated, so that should not be a problem, and any entry level receiver can handle them, but maybe not 4 ohm rated.

Don't over stress about wattage ratings. If you get a 50 watt per channel receiver (AVR or 2 channel), it will drive the speakers fine. It takes double the wattage to get 3db more volume sound output, and it takes a 10db increase for there to be a perceived doubling of volume by the listener. So the difference between a 50 watt and 100 watt per channel receiver is not that important in terms of max volume because it's only about a 30% increase in perceived volume.

Any name brand receiver, such as Denon, Onkyo, Yamaha, Harman Kardon, Marantz, and newer Pioneer models, can work just fine. Some Sony stuff is quite as good in SQ, so not the best choice. But then again, if you could find a used one for $25, what a great way to get started smily_headphones1.gif
post #87 of 96

Passive would be the choice but powered for convenience for sure.

post #88 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post

Questions are fine smily_headphones1.gif

First, stay away from 4 ohm rated speakers. They can be difficult to drive. ........
 

 

Normally, SS amps drive lower ohm speakers much more easily, i,e, more "W" amp power from lower Ohm speakers.

For tube amps, it is the reverse.

 

However, a lower ohms passive speaker can also be driven easily by Tube Amps.

It also depends on the impedance curve, the flatter (neutral) ones are more easily driven.

For e.g., my 4 Ohm rated Alesis Monitor 1 Mk2 passive speakers are easily driven by my 8W Tube Amp!

post #89 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord Soth View Post

Normally, SS amps drive lower ohm speakers much more easily, i,e, more "W" amp power from lower Ohm speakers.
For tube amps, it is the reverse.

However, a lower ohms passive speaker can also be driven easily by Tube Amps.
It also depends on the impedance curve, the flatter (neutral) ones are more easily driven.
For e.g., my 4 Ohm rated Alesis Monitor 1 Mk2 passive speakers are easily driven by my 8W Tube Amp!

Makes total sense.

But if someone is new to this, it can be difficult to figure out when a budget SS amp will be fine with 4 ohm speakers and when not. Since there are so many more 6 and 8ohm speakers, particularly in this kind of budget range, it's just the safer bet.
post #90 of 96

Only need to run one wire to each speaker. With active you always need to...power and line.

Each speaker is lighter in weight.

I use a powered mixer, so set-up is quick and easy.

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