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Why do CDs sound better than loss less audio files? - Page 3  

post #31 of 168
Make a 700MB zip archive with anything. Burn it to 100 different CD-Rs. Get some MD5/SHA1/whatever checksumming software. Compare checksums.

They will all be the same.


Now throw these CDs on the floor and walk over them. Compare checksums of copies which will be still fully readable.

They will all be the same.
Edited by mich41 - 3/10/13 at 2:56pm
post #32 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by omegalau View Post

 

Theoritically you're right about the audio quality CD-R is like 01001111001011, but it really difference ALOT with different quality of CD-R brunt. before you brunt the CD-R, use Nero DiseSpeed under Diseinfo to verify the manufacture from Verbatim, mitsubishi, sony rather then CMC , Ritek and etc (FYI, buying an verbatim dosen't mean you get verbatim, you might get CMC and the quality is bad.... ) , from my experience, those greenish reflection CD-R is bad.. the bluyish CD-R provide better result. So far my best result is Mistubishi Record Design CD-R Phono - Rex CD-R. Try both CD-Rs in home theather system, Hi - fi system or car audio, and sure you'll notice the difference with another cheap CMC or Ritek CD-R. By the way the better your sound system, the more obvious the difference you able to notice.

 

From what you're telling... you're telling the recording quality on Japan made expensive CD-R is the same with cheap china made CD-R? sure there's difference... you try to brunt two CD-Rs, like I mentioned above, one with good quality CD-R and the other one with bad quality. Test those CD-Rs brunt quality using Nero DiseSpeed for error C1 and C2, you'll see the bad quality CD-R results significantly with very obvious higher errors, peak or average errors. Bare in mind that although with alot of errors, the bad quality CD-R still playing smoothly in CD player or audio system.

 

In order to hear it as a "SKIP" in CD, you need alots of errors in a string, not a few of pits and landing. I have a very good quality original CD album, you can see very abvious cracked line even see things through the CD, however, it still play perfectly in my CD player. No skipping at all.

 

Back to your question about how to improve CD-R quality, I am not a CD-R manufacturer engineer, i won't know how to improve the quality. However, I do know that business man will cut down their cost as much as possible and produce a CD-R just enough for you to burn and read, this is china made CD-R. However there's still business man who wants provide premium quality product, trying to make every CD-R provide the quality of burning as closer to error free as possible, that's japan made CD-R

Yeah, only when there is a lot of stuff missing you'll hear skips. For a single pit or landing to be misread I wouldn't think it would be at all noticeable. 

 

What you wouldn't hear is an overall sound quality loss. It doesn't make any sense for certain elements to shine on a higher quality CD-R, it just means less artifacts. It doesn't know what the data is, if some is skipped it will be a totally random element of it. If you were talking about hearing artifacts with poor quality CD-R's I might buy into that. But not if you're talking about stuff like "warmth".

post #33 of 168

What you should do is play the CD's direct from how you are playing FLAC, like through your laptop, and use the same player too. Does it sound the same?

If so, its the sound player/DAC/sound card you are using for the FLAC playback, and not the fact that FLAC sounds any different.

If it is perfect, and ripped from your CD's, and from the same mix, etc, then it should be EXACTLY the same as CD.

 

The only difference will be in the way it is being put to the speakers.

post #34 of 168

It dosen't make sense, but in deed its happening. I can't fill in the fact with a theory in it. That's why I am asking here. and sure its not a mind thing, since it happen on my friends audio system too. They wonder why too....

post #35 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by musical-kage View Post

What you should do is play the CD's direct from how you are playing FLAC, like through your laptop, and use the same player too. Does it sound the same?

If so, its the sound player/DAC/sound card you are using for the FLAC playback, and not the fact that FLAC sounds any different.

If it is perfect, and ripped from your CD's, and from the same mix, etc, then it should be EXACTLY the same as CD.

 

The only difference will be in the way it is being put to the speakers.

 

No, it sound different, CD always better. that's why it puzzles me. The CD is brunt from the FLAC, and it always sound better then playing direct by FLAC.

post #36 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by omegalau View Post

and sure its not a mind thing, since it happen on my friends audio system too. They wonder why too....

That doesn't mean it's not a "mind thing". Look up: argumentum ad populum.

 

It makes no sense that playing audio from a CD drive in a computer sounds better than playing a FLAC file on the same computer. Either way, there are several error checking mechanisms that ensure the same bits are being sent to the sound card and also several buffers that prevent any audio drop-outs or similar glitches.


Edited by xnor - 3/12/13 at 7:33am
post #37 of 168

Do an ABX check. Without that, you will have no proof of this.

If you do one of them, and prove to us that you can tell a difference, we will believe you.

post #38 of 168

Read some site today where a guy was recommending to sand the inside edge and outside edge of your cd's to reduce light reflections.  He went further to color the edges black and drawn 6 lines edge to edge across the top and de-magnetized his discs.  Seems he was very pleased with his results and does this to all of his CD's.  Heh.  I almost exclusively buy used CD's but would throw up all over myself if I bought one of these.

post #39 of 168

I thought you need a green marker for the edges. bigsmile_face.gif

post #40 of 168

No way, black marker is where it's at!

post #41 of 168

I think green sounds more natural, maybe black makes the notes decay quicker??? biggrin.gif

post #42 of 168

Yes, green is it, but you have to use the official "CD Pen", and don't let the fact that it was a re-branded green Sharpie fool you.  They drained the original ink and refilled it with ink made from the essence of rare Jade Vine plant, processed during the second full moon of February, and bottled by Himalayan monks while standing on their left foot, linking arms and with their right middle finger up the nose of the monk to their left.  That's why the normally $1.98 Sharpie cost $15 once passed through that involved process.  

 

And yes, there was an actual CD pen.  I kept mine right between my audio brick and Tice clock.

post #43 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by musical-kage View Post

Do an ABX check. Without that, you will have no proof of this.

If you do one of them, and prove to us that you can tell a difference, we will believe you.

I am here to look for answers, not to prove anything to anyone. Even you guys believe in me so what? I still didn't get the answer. By the way what's your theory behind ABX check and how will it help, please clarify


Edited by omegalau - 3/13/13 at 12:40am
post #44 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by chewy4 View Post

 

I doubt your computer's CD player has a DAC on it. The sound should be processed from your sound card/audio chipset, just coming from your CD player rather than hard drive.

 

Today i check something over the back of some CD drives.... it turns out that it play the CD and output in analog itself thru Analog connector (RGDL) labelled in rear, perhaps my friend is correct.

post #45 of 168

There are too many variables. If you want to find out what's going on you need to provide details:

- which CD drive

- is digital/analog out used for CD audio playback or just a normal audio player application

- what application was used to play the CD/files

- how were the ape files created, why not use FLAC

- how did you compare CD/files

....

 

What I find ridiculous is when you claim different CD-R brands sound different. But that's just another variable so I suggest to use the original pressed CD for the comparison.

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