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Fostex TH900 Impressions & Discussion Thread - Page 20

post #286 of 7947


Thanks MuppetFace. Can't wait for your comparisons!

Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post

Well, I'd say they're not colored in a relative sense. They're less so than the W3000ANV and D7000 for instance, but compared to something like the SR-007 or SR-009, they do have an obvious coloration.

 

I'm going to be writing up some impressions of the TH900 compared to the W3000ANV and D7000 soon (along with pictures of the three together).



 

post #287 of 7947
Thread Starter 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/595683/fostex-th900-impressions-discussion-thread#post_8141968

 

Updated the first post with some facts quoted straight out of the included owner's manual. It gives some nice details about the headphone's construction and specifications, for those curious.

post #288 of 7947
Thread Starter 

While inspecting the headphones, I noticed one side seemed to have a metal-looking strip, where the earcup is slightly raised from the baffle. Like, almost unfinished looking. I was a little worried it was a QC issue. Looking in the owner's manual however, it specifically says:

 

"A silver ring is attached to the arrowed section (it points to the area I described on a diagram) indicating the right side housing. No ring is attached to the left side housing"

 

So it's purposeful, which strikes me as a bit odd. It's not used as a channel designator since the L and R indicators are on the adjustment sliders. Hmm. Curious.

post #289 of 7947
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post

While inspecting the headphones, I noticed one side seemed to have a metal-looking strip, where the earcup is slightly raised from the baffle. Like, almost unfinished looking. I was a little worried it was a QC issue. Looking in the owner's manual however, it specifically says:

 

"A silver ring is attached to the arrowed section (it points to the area I described on a diagram) indicating the right side housing. No ring is attached to the left side housing"

 

So it's purposeful, which strikes me as a bit odd. It's not used as a channel designator since the L and R indicators are on the adjustment sliders. Hmm. Curious.


Possibly meant to enable you to feel what's left and right (if you can feel the ring with your finger) without having to look?

 

post #290 of 7947
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kees View Post


Possibly meant to enable you to feel what's left and right (if you can feel the ring with your finger) without having to look?

 



Nope, the silver ring is too far recessed and the gap is too small--- there's no way you could feel it. It's not even that noticeable unless you're inspecting it up close. It's going to bug me now that I know of its existence but have no clue as to why it's there haha.

post #291 of 7947
I didn't notice that piece when I tried them at RMAF. Interesting.
post #292 of 7947
Thread Starter 

Yeah, it's something I only noticed today after inspecting them closely. It's one of two enigmas of the TH900. The other is this:

 

The hinges that allow the earcups to swivel on the horizontal plane differ on each side. The right side will allow the cup to swivel frontward more but less further backward relative to the left side, which will allow the cup to swivel backward more but not frontward as much relative to the right. The effect causes the TH900 to skew to the left when you set them down. It's like having two left feet or something.

 

Very, very odd!


Edited by MuppetFace - 4/6/12 at 3:32pm
post #293 of 7947

 

->Overall sound characteristic: Damped with a firm low frequency reproduction instead of a bore core bass. Transparent and very clean midrange frequency.

 



i wonder what they mean by "bore core bass".  is that a mechanical/technical term or are they saying it's not boring with overdone bass?

 
post #294 of 7947


Hi Muppetface,

It seems like you have a ton of experience with top-tier full-sized headphones, so I thought I'd see if I could get some input from you smile.gif.

I know a lot more about IEMs than full-size headphones.  I have two custom IEMs, the Heir Audio 8.A and Future Sonics mg6pro, both of which I love.  

So, now I'm looking into getting a full-size headphone that might be considered the full-size analogue of either of those two IEMs [in sound signature and quality].  I'm willing to spend quite a bit, but not as much as the Stax 009 + amp.  Not much more than $2,000.

Thanks!

Peter

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post

Does it have to be sealed? I ask because the TakeT H2+ has a similar level of detail, clarity, and balance as the Omega II with the exception of a tremendous bass presence. Its bass is the closest I've heard come to fullsized speakers in a headphone. I also find it outclasses the Omega II in terms of its sense of presence. I've never heard another headphone render music with quite so much a sense of physicality.



 

 
post #295 of 7947
Oh, i forgot to mention that i do have a Stax Lambda Signature + SRM-T1 [i got it in the early 1990s].  I like the ethereal quality [as you've noted with the Lambda series] but find it to be too thin sounding and lacking in weight, especially in the bass.  One of the headphones I've been reading about on Head-Fi is the omega II mk2.  Are you able to compare the two?  thanks!
post #296 of 7947
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fusionramjet View Post


Hi Muppetface,

It seems like you have a ton of experience with top-tier full-sized headphones, so I thought I'd see if I could get some input from you smile.gif.

I know a lot more about IEMs than full-size headphones.  I have two custom IEMs, the Heir Audio 8.A and Future Sonics mg6pro, both of which I love.  

So, now I'm looking into getting a full-size headphone that might be considered the full-size analogue of either of those two IEMs [in sound signature and quality].  I'm willing to spend quite a bit, but not as much as the Stax 009 + amp.  Not much more than $2,000.

Thanks!

Peter

 



 

 


I haven't heard the 8.A yet, but others have commented that its presentation and balance remind them of the LCD-2 somewhat. May want to look into that further. Haven't heard the MG 6 Pro either unfortunately.

 

Seems like you're looking for a slight bass emphasis? Aside from the LCD-2, the D7000 may also be worth a consideration. Also the Signature Pro.

post #297 of 7947
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post


I haven't heard the 8.A yet, but others have commented that its presentation and balance remind them of the LCD-2 somewhat. May want to look into that further. Haven't heard the MG 6 Pro either unfortunately.

 

Seems like you're looking for a slight bass emphasis? Aside from the LCD-2, the D7000 may also be worth a consideration. Also the Signature Pro.



Thank you for reply!

I think what I'm looking for is a combination of largest soundstage possible + a solid bass foundation to support great mids and highs + the speed and resolution to not get muddied up with lots of different instruments playing at the same time.  

I listen mostly to large-scale symphonic music [epic movie trailer music].

So, I'd like it to sound as grand, large, and powerful as possible, so I feel as close as possible to being in a large concert hall. [i know no headphone comes very close, but still]

From what I've read, it seems that the headphones usually recommended for classical music don't necessarily have strong bass, as if the thought is that classical doesn't need strong bass.  But, the music I listen to requires a strong bass presence (i think classical also needs strong bass, actually strong everything).  I don't want an artificial bass boost, i just want it to really kick out the bass [high quality] when the recording calls for it.

Also, from what I've gathered, it seems that there is typically a trade-off between size of soundstage and strength of bass response, based on if it's open or closed.

There are two headphones I've read about that seem to offer a good combination of both:

JVC DX1000 [is its soundstage as big as the best open phones?]

Beyerdynamic DT990 [do you have any thoughts about the soundstage on these?]

Regarding the Denon D7000, I've read mixed things about the size of its soundstage.  A lot of positive impressions, but some that say it's rather small [maybe just compared to an open phone].

Regarding the LCD-2, from what I've read, it sounds totally like what I'm looking for, except I've read that it has a very small soundstage, most appropriate for intimate/small room music.  So, i presume it wouldn't work great for large-scale concert hall symphonic works?

Is the Ultrasone Signature Pro closed?  If so, does the S-Logic help with the size of the soundstage?

Thanks again!

Peter

 

 

 
post #298 of 7947
Quote:
Originally Posted by fusionramjet View Post



Thank you for reply!

I think what I'm looking for is a combination of largest soundstage possible + a solid bass foundation to support great mids and highs + the speed and resolution to not get muddied up with lots of different instruments playing at the same time.  

I listen mostly to large-scale symphonic music [epic movie trailer music].

So, I'd like it to sound as grand, large, and powerful as possible, so I feel as close as possible to being in a large concert hall. [i know no headphone comes very close, but still]

From what I've read, it seems that the headphones usually recommended for classical music don't necessarily have strong bass, as if the thought is that classical doesn't need strong bass.  But, the music I listen to requires a strong bass presence (i think classical also needs strong bass, actually strong everything).  I don't want an artificial bass boost, i just want it to really kick out the bass [high quality] when the recording calls for it.

Also, from what I've gathered, it seems that there is typically a trade-off between size of soundstage and strength of bass response, based on if it's open or closed.

There are two headphones I've read about that seem to offer a good combination of both:

JVC DX1000 [is its soundstage as big as the best open phones?]

Beyerdynamic DT990 [do you have any thoughts about the soundstage on these?]

Regarding the Denon D7000, I've read mixed things about the size of its soundstage.  A lot of positive impressions, but some that say it's rather small [maybe just compared to an open phone].

Regarding the LCD-2, from what I've read, it sounds totally like what I'm looking for, except I've read that it has a very small soundstage, most appropriate for intimate/small room music.  So, i presume it wouldn't work great for large-scale concert hall symphonic works?

Is the Ultrasone Signature Pro closed?  If so, does the S-Logic help with the size of the soundstage?

Thanks again!

Peter

 

 

 


From what you're describing this reminds me of a Qualia 010, but it's discontinued, expensive, and rare. This is most challenging to obtain, but it would ideally be the best one to get that fits your description: biggest soundstage with solid bass.

 

"Large concert hall soundstage" would be HD800. Several head-fiers complain about the lean bass, but I personally think that for the neutral sounding HD800, there's plenty, especially for classical and movie trailer music. I purchased this headphone over LCD-2 because I want a biggest soundstage headphone possible.

 

I am using my roommate's DT880's. In the past, I've listened to DT770's, maybe DT990's, and T1's. Typically, Beyerdynamic's sound signature is its realistic soundstage. It may not have a huge soundstage like the HD800, but for those who are on budget (can't afford LCD-2, T1, and other high-end headphones), DT880's and DT990's are great alternative neutral-like (it sounds neutral to my ears) headphones with an extra oomph in bass.

 

I tried Ultrasone Edition 8 on a few occasions, but I prefer D7000 when it comes to competing for biggest soundstage in a closed headphone.

 

Many people prefer DX1000 over D7000. I didn't get a chance to listen to DX1000, so I can't comment on the comparison. But from what I've heard D7000 is a much more durable headphone than DX1000. With that said, I made no regrets purchasing the D7000.

 

Lastly, if you are up for a challenge, and if you like colored sound over neutral sound, I suggest looking for a Sony MDR-CD3000. It's also discontinued, but it's on sale every now and then. It's very old-school, but for closed soundstage headphone, the CD3000's soundstage is huge, even huger than D7000. The soundstage in CD3000 is arguably on par with the R10.


Edited by gzone3lement - 4/8/12 at 4:30pm
post #299 of 7947
Quote:
Originally Posted by gzone3lement View Post

 

I tried Ultrasone Edition 8 on a few occasions, but I prefer D7000 when it comes to competing for biggest soundstage in a closed headphone.

 


+1 (haven't tried ed 8, but I have the signature pro, and used to have the pro900/2900; the D7000s still have the most expansive soundstage - looking forward to trying the HD800 as soundstage is the second most important thing to me after bass).

 

post #300 of 7947

I think my last post is getting off topic, so I'll get back on subject. If the Fostex TH-900 is a sound upgrade from Sony MDR-CD3000, that would be awesome!

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