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Original vs. Remastered Albums? - Page 10

post #136 of 153
Oh, you're right. Please, continue discussing this very important subject. My bad.
post #137 of 153

He was disputing also that the re-remastering was any better in quality than the earlier original mastering . But in the intervening time as I found in the previous post the US got different versions of the box sets I did not know this.Under the Capitol label there was issued {the Beatles] Volume 1 and volume 2-2004 and 2006.as well I take that to mean these were in addition to the main re remastering? According to posts on another website also was talk about how the US actually got better re-remastering than the UK issue. This seemingly applied to the early recordings which were done in a more faithful version than the UKs but the later Beatles recordings were very good[in his opinion] . So there seems to be some mystery over this . The poster I think gave 4+ a half stars to the latest re remastering marked down because of the earlier re recordings. Although the US version got better marks for the earlier     re recordings . Maybe some body can figure this out . Its getting complicated and the recording field isn't my strong point. --Maybe I should point out to save confusion we are talking about all the re recordings on the one box set  and by earlier recordings I mean --Please Please  me and the next several original LP recordings into CDs  in  the same box set. 


Edited by duncan1 - 8/25/13 at 8:25am
post #138 of 153
I keep saying it, but there are only two remasterings of Beatles material. The original flat transfers done for individual CD release in the late 80s, and the recent Stereo Box set. Of those, most audiophiles prefer the flat transfer because the Stereo Box is slightly compressed.
post #139 of 153

I read the Beatles Wiki by James N Periman who seems to go along with what you said as to the remasterings although he quotes other pressings from Japan. But he also says  listening on Naim Amps and Quad electrostatics that some of the vinyl  LP early pressings are better than the some of the CDs that wont go down well in objectives cafe. So that would make any comment from him suspect including his agreement with you? I looked at the mono scope graphs  and they looked better than the stereo versions of two songs with more detail showing. So I have to agree with the scope display.  

post #140 of 153
The MFSL LPs were well mastered and pressed on high grade vinyl. Those would probably come the closest. But if you take the original CD release and do a little bit of judicious equalization, you can make them sound just as good or better than the MFSL LPs.

In the recent remasterings, the mono box was much better than the stereo box.
post #141 of 153
This is a really old thread, and I'm sorry for bringing it back, but duncan1 is a hell of a trip
post #142 of 153

I've heard it said in this thread that CD's & DVD's are a wonderful medium for audio.  There isn't any audio on them - just ones and zeros, and they sound like it!

post #143 of 153

There isn't sound on LPs either, just tiny little wiggly scratches in the plastic. And there isn't music on musical scores, just funny little ink blots on lines.

post #144 of 153

bought the box set of beatles stereo remastered . i think it came out in 2009, anyway, it sounded MUCH clearer and crisper than original, 

post #145 of 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by boblt29 View Post
 

bought the box set of beatles stereo remastered . i think it came out in 2009, anyway, it sounded MUCH clearer and crisper than original, 

 

That's because it's louder and slightly compressed. ;)

post #146 of 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by LFF View Post

That's because it's louder and slightly compressed. wink.gif
Really? I'm not like stubborn so im up for learning things, do you have proof? Not to sound offensive but I'd like to see the difference
post #147 of 153

He's right. The first CD release was a straight transfer off the original master with no alteration. The newer stereo box supposedly has some tiny edits to remove little clicks and bumps (but I'll be darned if I can notice any of those fixes.) The bigger difference is that the dynamic range is more compressed in the stereo box than the original release. It isn't a lot of compression. There is no reason to buy the other mastering if you have one of them already.

post #148 of 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by boblt29 View Post


Really? I'm not like stubborn so im up for learning things, do you have proof? Not to sound offensive but I'd like to see the difference

Maybe this will help:

 

http://dr.loudness-war.info/album/list/dr?artist=beatles

post #149 of 153

There is no option to delete this post of

mine. Admins/Moderators can you

please?


Edited by TheSonicTruth - 4/12/16 at 10:38am
post #150 of 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

He's right. The first CD release was a straight transfer off the original master with no alteration. The newer stereo box supposedly has some tiny edits to remove little clicks and bumps (but I'll be darned if I can notice any of those fixes.) The bigger difference is that the dynamic range is more compressed in the stereo box than the original release. It isn't a lot of compression. There is no reason to buy the other mastering if you have one of them already.

 

Greetings:

 

 

I have uncovered some information suggesting that at least some of

the 1987 Beatle transfers to CD might not have been as "flat" as we

were led to believe.

 

Following is a link to DR Database analysis of a needle-drop of

the 1969 English vinyl LP release of Abbey Road:

 

http://dr.loudness-war.info/album/view/107500

 

 

And next is a link to DR Database analysis of CDP 7 46446 2, the

1987 CD release of Abbey Road:

 

http://dr.loudness-war.info/album/view/35470

 

 

As can be seen, there is more than just one dB difference

between the total & track dynamic ranges of the 1987 CD

and those of the aforementioned 1969 vinyl LP. 

 

I verified the stats for the 1987 CD myself in Foobar2000,

which likely was used for the analysis of that CD in the

DR Database, and probably for the early vinyl LP.

 

This would suggest that some processing(dynamics, EQ)

was applied during the transfer to the highly anticipated

CD collection of the Beatles in 1987.  Again, differences of

1 dB or less between the CD and the LP can be disregarded.

But the difference in this Abbey Road case(DR10 for the CD

vs DR13 for the English vinyl) is cause for alarm -

and disappointment.  It means that what is on the 1987 CD

does not sound exactly like what was released on LP 18

years prior.

 

Happily this was not the case with the first release on CD

of "Sgt. Pepper's":  A couple tracks on that CD score

slightly more dynamic than the original vinyl, again, by

1dB DR value, so it is probably insignificant, and positively

indicative of a truly *flat* transfer* of that album to CD.


Edited by TheSonicTruth - 4/12/16 at 10:40am
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