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Alan Parsons (Dark Side of the Moon) Rips Audiophiles - Page 2

post #16 of 27

No rip I seen on audiophile. He saying pretty much what many do agree about vinyl The resurgence in vinyl is a ridiculous small number and a blip in the total record sales in the industry. Early CD was very bad. i remember when Sony said perfect sound forever and released the first batch iof pure garbage  but now CD has evolved and is closer to vinyl than ever but IMO Vinyl is a tough act to follow for  musicality and may never be duplicated by any other format but Parson is right somewhere down the road it will be all download and a bunch of new crap to deal with till its perfected. For now I am happy there will still be CD's and when its gone there will be zillions to buy used

post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank I View Post

Early CD was very bad. i remember when Sony said perfect sound forever and released the first batch iof pure garbage  but now CD has evolved and is closer to vinyl than ever but IMO Vinyl is a tough act to follow for  musicality and may never be duplicated by any other format but Parson is right somewhere down the road it will be all download and a bunch of new crap to deal with till its perfected. For now I am happy there will still be CD's and when its gone there will be zillions to buy used


I have several cds in my collection from the eighties.They sound perfectly good. Cd was lightyears ahead of vinyl from day one. If they really were closer to vinyl, I for one would not be buying them ;) Try this: make a cd copy of the sound coming from the vinyl player. All the wonderful qualities of vinyl will be on that copy.

 

 

Regards,

 

L.
 

 

post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

No they aren't. In fact quite a few songs on his albums have that late 70s thump thump disco bass line.



 

The Raven.

post #19 of 27

The only thing I saw of marginal contention is the dig on mp3s, which is something of an overgeneralization or maybe just an outdated notion.  I think a lot of people are still turned off due to the early proliferation of 128 kbps encodes using relatively primitive encoders that are much worse than say modern LAME (even at equivalent bitrates).  There's really not much lost with modern high bitrate lossy encoding, in terms of what humans can actually hear and distinguish.

post #20 of 27


Quote:

Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

Read it and weep...

 

http://www.cepro.com/story/alanparsons.html

 

Vinyl isn't superior to CDs. He's reasonably happy with the CD format.

 

Most audiophiles pay too much attention to equipment and brand names and not enough to room acoustics.

 

Good sounding systems can be bought at Walmart and Costco.

 

Ha!

 

Vinyl isn't superior to CD's today. Not with digital recording.

 

Now, I would still rather listen to my vinyl copy of DSOTM, rather than one of the new re-masters on CD that sound like loose asswater.
 

post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

What? Vocals and rhythm and no bass? You must be thinking of someone else.This is the guy who created the sound of Dark Side of the Moon, Year of the Cat and dozens of other high production value albums. He was all about engineering for top quality sound. He knows what he's talking about.

 

  • Turn of a Friendly Card
  • Ammonia Avenue
  • I, Robot
  • Eye in the Sky
  • Gaudi

 

These are good in musical composition and art. However, they are bass-light. It's mood music.  And room acoustics are not significant, IMO.

 

post #22 of 27
I don't find either Turn of a Friendly Card or I Robot to be bass-lite by any means.
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by fubar3 View Post

And room acoustics are not significant, IMO.

What are you basing that assertion on? In my experience, room acoustics are very important in a full sized system. Without addressing room acoustics, sound quality has a relatively low ceiling, no matter how great the system is.

* * * * *

Sitting here listening to I Robot, I don't find it bass light, but the bass certainly isn't overemphasized like it is in some contemporary genres.
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by fubar3 View Post

  • Turn of a Friendly Card
  • Ammonia Avenue
  • I, Robot
  • Eye in the Sky
  • Gaudi

These are good in musical composition and art. However, they are bass-light. It's mood music.  And room acoustics are not significant, IMO.

Inclined to agree that APP is bass light, and that suites it like you mentioned.
Strongly disagree with your view on room acoustics. When bass frequencies can extend 20dB+ in an untreated room, controlling that is quite significant.
post #25 of 27
Thread Starter 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Leporello View Post


I have several cds in my collection from the eighties.They sound perfectly good. Cd was lightyears ahead of vinyl from day one. 


That is totally true. I remember hearing David Bowie on CD early on and being astounded at how much better than the RCA dynaflex LPs it sounded. Parsons mentions Dave Gruson who recorded some experimental albums for JVC to demonstrate the abilities of digital sound. The sounded fantastic and they still do.

post #26 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fubar3 View Post

 

These are good in musical composition and art. However, they are bass-light. It's mood music.  And room acoustics are not significant, IMO.

 


Good job! Every sentence there is wrong.

 

Parsons music is and always was canned. The musicians were just sessions guys there to make sound for the engineering effects. Today, the music sounds pretentious, overworked and dated... But remarkably well engineered.

 

As for bass, I would bet if you paid attention to your own room acoustics, you'd be able to hear it.

post #27 of 27

>>As for bass, I would bet if you paid attention to your own room acoustics, you'd be able to hear it.

 

Sure there is some bass, but it sounds compressed and less crisp than I usually hear. These are old albums which I have heard in many places with varying equipment and found no difference in the sound.

 

Parsons only listens to music in the studio where it is a job and not necessarily a pleasure. So I don't get the fuss about room acoustics.

 

I bet any enthusiast who cares about music reproduction in the home is more sophisticated than Parson's in this particular topic. But hey, I like some of his project albums.

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