Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Headphones (full-size) › Denon AH-D2000's worth it?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Denon AH-D2000's worth it? - Page 8

post #106 of 111
Getting back to the discussion about how the D2000 sounds with and without an amp - would a decent home theater receiver power these OK? I have a pair of Sennheiser HD570s at 64 ohms impedance and a sensitivity of 102 dB. My iPod doesn't drive them well, but my Yamaha home theater receiver does a fine job with them. I would think if my receiver can power the Senns OK, it would do fine with the D2000, since its impedance is 25 ohms with a sensitivity of 106 dB. Thoughts?
post #107 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by GiacomoHoldini View Post

Getting back to the discussion about how the D2000 sounds with and without an amp - would a decent home theater receiver power these OK? I have a pair of Sennheiser HD570s at 64 ohms impedance and a sensitivity of 102 dB. My iPod doesn't drive them well, but my Yamaha home theater receiver does a fine job with them. I would think if my receiver can power the Senns OK, it would do fine with the D2000, since its impedance is 25 ohms with a sensitivity of 106 dB. Thoughts?


 

They are fine without an amp from a portable player like many others have already said. But if you do decide to get an amp, avoid the Fiio E7. It doesn't do jack with my denons. I believe the amped and unamped denons would probably sound pretty similar anyways, the impedance is very low and it doesn't need much power to drive the magnets.

post #108 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by catsup View Post

I believe the amped and unamped denons would probably sound pretty similar anyways, the impedance is very low and it doesn't need much power to drive the magnets.

That was my thinking. Even if amping will help, I'm trying to imagine what a dedicated amp could do that my receiver couldn't already do, given the impedance and sensitivity. We're not talking about a 300 or 600 ohm, ultra high-end set of cans, after all.
post #109 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by GiacomoHoldini View Post

That was my thinking. Even if amping will help, I'm trying to imagine what a dedicated amp could do that my receiver couldn't already do, given the impedance and sensitivity. We're not talking about a 300 or 600 ohm, ultra high-end set of cans, after all.

Yeah, a decent receiver will drive them easily. Just about anything will. They do sound better with better gear, but it isn't an Earth-shattering change.
post #110 of 111

 

Ok let's settle the debate about this as to whether the D2000s are worth it. Yes. 

 

A little while ago I picked up the D2000s on sale for about $210 new. At first, the highs were piercing, and at times sibilant, then it became a little dull, and eventually they burned in fully and left the final sound, which is very good. 

 

Comfort: I can't really elaborate much on this but they are definitely great to wear. One of the big concerns that is reiterated on this forum is that they are too loose. These statements are way overblowned if not entirely misleading. I am not sure what kind of clamping force they are used to but if they find the D2000s lacking then they must be used to getting their skulls crushed. Perhaps they are referring to the fact that the D2000s are not really portable. While you could get away with it, it's just stupid to try to use the D2000s while you are moving around, exercising, or anything other than being relatively stationary. There is a long cord so yes you can move around in the house, but again, this long cord is part of what makes the D2000s not very portable. This cord is way too long for my liking, I do not know why people need or want a cord that is probably something like 6 feet long. I don't know where to put it when I am listening out of my laptop. Besides this, it's a comfortable headphone, and my ears do not get hot - in fact the XB700 made my ears a lot hotter. It's good enough, if you complain about this headphone, you're just being picky. 

 

Durability: If you have not heard about the frequent problem with screws falling out then you haven't researched the D2000 well enough. They aren’t exactly the most durable headphones but I wouldn’t really expect the screw to fall out of this thing. The cord is extremely well built and almost requires wire cutters to destroy. One good feature is that the part of the cord that connects to the source is reinforced, in prior headphones this part would break apart or warp badly. The headphone is made of good materials, and the size adjustment works superb – it clicks right into place and doesn’t shift.

 

Lows: Better than the M50 because it’s more natural and not just pumped up so you can get more bass [quantity]. Impact is lacking but it seems audiophiles prefer even bass rather than a boom. I can agree with that, I don’t want impact, I want subbass.

 

Mids: This is a bassy headphone relative to Sennheisers and AKG and whatnot, but the mids are above average. It’s what most bassheads strive for – bass that you can hear, but without drowning out the rest of the spectrum like the mids.  The D2000 strikes a good equilibrium between the different parts of the sound spectrum such that it can be described as an audiophile-quality headphone.

 

Highs: At first, it was bright, and sibilant, but it tamed down after burn in. They are a bit more pronounced than what would be ideal, as they tend to intrude where they shouldn’t. The highs are a big reason why the mids seem recessed to some. It would be a better headphone if the highs were reduced a bit.

 

Value: This is why you get the D2000s. It can play any type of music well or at least decently. Lower tier headphones such as the XB500/700/M50/CAL/HARX simply cannot. No other headphone at $200 can do what this headphone does, and to get a decent upgrade from this headphone you might have to go to the $260-ish HD 650. After that, there isn’t really a headphone worth it until the D5000/D7000, or better yet the Audeze LCD-2. I have tried the Pro 900 and if you want an accurate reproduction of music as the artist intended then you would avoid that headphone. Based on the headphones I have tried, the best upgrade path for someone who wants somewhat accurate music but with bass presence is to go (1) If you’re broke, cheap IEMs i.e. Koss or Sennheiser CX300 at $30 (2) Don’t go for any of the garbage in between like the XB series or M50, save up and get the D2000s, it’s a better value and investment at $200 (3) When you can afford it (I cannot which is why I’m stuck with the D2000), the Audeze LCD-2 at $700+. The D5000/7000 is preferred by some but I don’t see enough of a change from the D2000s to justify the price increase. 

post #111 of 111

Hi guys, I'm new to the site and this my first post. I have recently purchased a set of AKG K550 but I really can't get on with the fit they are very loose on my head and the pads are Huge to say the least. Can I ask those who may have had a pair of K550 or at least tried them on will the Denons fit better? I tried to find a pair to try on but they are like gold dust around here.

 

Any views will be greatly appreciated 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Headphones (full-size)
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Headphones (full-size) › Denon AH-D2000's worth it?