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Android phones and USB DACs - Page 193

post #2881 of 5966
Quote:
Originally Posted by jared basshead View Post

E6 supports otg, so curious too. Do report when you find out. I think it may not work with E07, but might as well try rather stay in dark...

She hasn't called back yet :-(

Would it work with a FiiO E17?

post #2882 of 5966
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanBa View Post

 

As USB is a master-slave communication bus [master = computer = USB host, slave = peripheral = USB peripheral], the USB OTG feature allows a native peripheral like Android phone to switch to USB host mode so that it can interact with a USB peripheral like USB DAC.
 
Appropriate software program of the host is needed to drive the peripheral.
 
USB Device Class Definition for Audio Devices specification details the common operation of standard USB DAC peripherals so that a "USB Device Class Definition for Audio Devices"-compliant or USB Audio-compliant software program, like USB Audio Recorder PRO at the user space or USB Audio Driver for ALSA at the kernel space, can drive USB Device Class Definition for Audio Devices or standard USB DACs without special drivers.
 
 

 

that doesn't really answer my question. So do u still need an app like USB audio recorder pro for it to work?

 

i'll use the nexus 4 as a example, it has USB OTG via modding. But to get usb dacs to work, you need usb audio recorder pro. With the Nuforce Icon dac, do you still need USB audio recorder pro for the nexus 4? 

post #2883 of 5966
Yes.
 
USB Audio Recorder PRO is needed on a USB host-enabled Android device to drive a USB DAC (i.e. "But to get usb dacs to work, you need usb audio recorder pro").
 
As a USB OTG modding allows Nexus 4 operating as USB host, and as a NuForce Icon DAC is a USB DAC, USB Audio Recorder PRO is needed on a USB host-enabled Nexus 4 to drive a NuForce Icon DAC.
post #2884 of 5966
Quote:
Originally Posted by drSeehas View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by jared basshead View Post

E6 supports otg, so curious too. Do report when you find out. I think it may not work with E07, but might as well try rather stay in dark...

She hasn't called back yet :-(

Would it work with a FiiO E17?

Oh I doubt that but who knows, might as well try. I really dont understand this, you need usb audio drivers and heck I searched everywhere on symbian belle and no word about usb audio or usb dacs. Fascinating

Sent from my C5302 using Tapatalk 4 Beta
post #2885 of 5966

Cable mess but it worked first time:

Nexus 7 (AOKP ROM, Franco USB host kernel) > E-DAC > O2

 

post #2886 of 5966

Galaxy Note 2 & Nova tiny-M:

http://nova-audio.myshopify.com/products/nova-tiny-m-portable-dac-pc-mac-android

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.151468016614.129415.151453156614&type=3

 

Galaxy Note 2 > digital USB audio out >> Nova tiny-M >> IEM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Edited by DanBa - 8/15/13 at 1:08am
post #2887 of 5966

where do i get one of those tiny m's in australia??

post #2888 of 5966

<warning>this post is influenced by my finding a website selling USB cables for up to several hundred dollars.... seriously, some copper wire and various dielectric materials... several hundred dollars.  This isn't a laboratory grade multi-gigiahertz RF cable here.  I am shocked that such a company is able to stay in business selling cables like this, i mean shocked that they have a customer base to support themselves.</warning>

 

SV_huMMer

You are absolutely correct about not hearing the digital cables.  Any who claims to hear the difference between USB cables (which are compliant to the specification) just doesn't understand how these digital communication systems work.  And before anyone says... oh but you can hear the jitter, guess what... the serial signal is buffered, converted to parallel, and clocked out with a different clock.  So no you won't hear varying levels of spec compliant jitter on the serial signal.  And you won't hear any noise on the digital signal (unless it causes bit errors, but that sort of noise isn't going to be the fault of a spec compliant cable).  So as long as you purchase a cable which is verified to comply with the USB specification (and that cable is not defective), the received signal is not going to have any bit errors, and bit errors are the only thing you could possibly hear.

 

I would even say that you will not hear RF interference from either the cellular signal or the WiFi signal, or the bluetooth, or any other RF communication signal (think about those frequencies and the limits of human hearing... Sure there could be mixing and downconversion, but the devices processing the audio signal aren't going to be efficient enough at RF frequencies to yield audible signal levels form mixing).  Now what you might hear is switching noise from the power consumption as those devices turn on and off attempting to save power (they would probably switch off at rates varying from uS to longer durations, and 20kHz is a 50uS period).  So while it might help audio quality to put your device in airplane mode, it isn't because of RF interference.  And if it were you would hear those effects all the time everywhere in the world (you would be surprised at the RF noise that laptop power supplies can emit, not to mention your microwave oven running at those same frequencies, and countless other ubiquitous sources).

 

Just my $0.02, but I do design analog and digital communications systems for a living

post #2889 of 5966
Quote:
Originally Posted by getek View Post

this post is influenced by my finding a website selling USB cables for up to several hundred dollars.... seriously, some copper wire and various dielectric materials... several hundred dollars.  This isn't a laboratory grade multi-gigiahertz RF cable here.  I am shocked that such a company is able to stay in business selling cables like this, i mean shocked that they have a customer base to support themselves.

SV_huMMer
You are absolutely correct about not hearing the digital cables.  Any who claims to hear the difference between USB cables (which are compliant to the specification) just doesn't understand how these digital communication systems work.  And before anyone says... oh but you can hear the jitter, guess what... the serial signal is buffered, converted to parallel, and clocked out with a different clock.  So no you won't hear varying levels of spec compliant jitter on the serial signal.  And you won't hear any noise on the digital signal (unless it causes bit errors, but that sort of noise isn't going to be the fault of a spec compliant cable).  So as long as you purchase a cable which is verified to comply with the USB specification (and that cable is not defective), the received signal is not going to have any bit errors, and bit errors are the only thing you could possibly hear.

I would even say that you will not hear RF interference from either the cellular signal or the WiFi signal, or the bluetooth, or any other RF communication signal (think about those frequencies and the limits of human hearing... Sure there could be mixing and downconversion, but the devices processing the audio signal aren't going to be efficient enough at RF frequencies to yield audible signal levels form mixing).  Now what you might hear is switching noise from the power consumption as those devices turn on and off attempting to save power (they would probably switch off at rates varying from uS to longer durations, and 20kHz is a 50uS period).  So while it might help audio quality to put your device in airplane mode, it isn't because of RF interference.  And if it were you would hear those effects all the time everywhere in the world (you would be surprised at the RF noise that laptop power supplies can emit, not to mention your microwave oven running at those same frequencies, and countless other ubiquitous sources).

Just my $0.02, but I do design analog and digital communications systems for a living

I wish more people on this site would possess an understanding like this rather than espousing all these stupid myths.

I think they should consider changing the motto to, "Welcome to headfi, sorry about your iq."
post #2890 of 5966
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanBa View Post

Galaxy Note 2 & Nova tiny-M:

http://nova-audio.myshopify.com/products/nova-tiny-m-portable-dac-pc-mac-android

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.151468016614.129415.151453156614&type=3

 

Galaxy Note 2 > digital USB audio out >> Nova tiny-M >> IEM

 

How does it sound? I am wondering if it's plug-and-play with a Galaxy S4?

post #2891 of 5966
So what would I need to hook up to the new fiio e18? A simple otg cable or do I need one that has the pins shortened like what was mentioned?

Lastly, is it easier to just connect via usb out of my computer and into a DAC? Is there a special cable required for that? Man this is confusing.....lol
post #2892 of 5966
Ok, so I know I have this right.........I need a simple USB micro otg to USB 2.0 like on amazon if I want to connect via 5 pin usb to either a computer or DAC that supports USB. If I want to go direct into a fiio e17 etc, I then need a special USB micro to USB mini cable with the pins shortened to get it to work......
Is this right?
post #2893 of 5966
USB is a master-slave communication bus: the master or computer is a USB host, the slave or peripheral is a USB peripheral.
The Galaxy S4 is a dual-role USB device, sometimes a USB host, sometimes a USB peripheral.
In order to interact with a USB peripheral like the FiiO E17, the Galaxy S4 should be switched to USB host mode.
It’s the case when a functional Micro-A USB plug (i.e. pin 4 connected to pin 5) is inserted into the Micro USB receptacle of the Galaxy S4. 
 
Such a Micro USB plug is one of the two ends of a so-called USB OTG cable adapter (i.e. functional Micro-A USB plug to Standard-A receptacle cable adapter).
Galaxy S4 > digital USB audio out >> USB OTG cable adapter + regular USB cable provided by FiiO >> FiiO E17 >> headphones
 
Such a Micro USB plug is one of the two ends of a so-called USB OTG cable provided by USB cable makers.
Galaxy S4 > digital USB audio out >> Micro USB plug to Mini USB plug USB OTG cable >> FiiO E17 >> headphones
post #2894 of 5966
Quote:
Originally Posted by darinf View Post

How does it sound? 

 

Sorry, I don't know. I have just reported the info.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by darinf View Post

I am wondering if it's plug-and-play with a Galaxy S4?

 

Plug and play, if everything is compliant with the USB specification.
 
The designers of the Galaxy S3 / Note2 and the Nova tiny-M have the same understanding of the USB specification: Galaxy S3 / Note2 and Nova tiny-M can interwork.

Edited by DanBa - 8/15/13 at 5:26pm
post #2895 of 5966

Another tiny DAC with a MicroUSB plug like the Nova tiny-M: HiFimeDIY Sabre Android DAC

http://hifimediy.com/index.php?route=product/product&path=62&product_id=124

 

" This Sabre Android Dac has a MicroUSB cable instead of a usb cable and works with some Android phones without any drivers or tweaks.

 
Current tested confirmed models include:
Samsung Galaxy Note 2 running newest software update
Samsung Galaxy Mega running Android 4.2.2
Samsung Galaxy S3 with newest software
Samsung Galaxy S4 with Android 4.2.2
LG Optimus G Pro 4.1.2+
Possibly works with most Android phones running Android 4.2.2
Does not seem to work with Cyanogenmod software
 
Please let us know if you have tested it with other phones, and we'll update the list.
 
No settings needs to be changed on Samsung phones. Volume up/down keys controls volume in the same way as for the regular output.

The Android Dac is the same DAC as the "Tiny" model. It uses a PCM2706 USB receiver chip and the Sabre ES9023 dac chip."

 

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